Oculus Quest 2

GreenOrbs

Gawd
Joined
Jun 7, 2017
Messages
585
Using the dual band 5Ghz antenna on my PC worked perfectly fine - I could pick a dedicated 40Mhz band and max everything. It doesn't make sense why this would be worse than a dedicated router, unless you don't know what you're doing to set it up, or the onboard Wifi is bad.

Just FYI, the developer of Virtual Desktop has been saying on reddit that VD doesn't work well with hotspots as compared with dedicated routers. I can't find the original post which was more detailed if I remember correctly but here's a more recent one saying don't do it. For some reason its higher latency and could explain the 50-100 ms delay you are experiencing. Godin recommends routers from TP-Link and Asus as working especially well with Virtual Desktop.

https://www.reddit.com/r/OculusQues...v?utm_source=share&utm_medium=web2x&context=3
 

reaper12

2[H]4U
Joined
Oct 21, 2006
Messages
2,556
My IPD is 69mm so right at the edge of the quest2 comfort zone (which is really optimized for ~63mm).

Using the dual band 5Ghz antenna on my PC worked perfectly fine - I could pick a dedicated 40Mhz band and max everything. It doesn't make sense why this would be worse than a dedicated router, unless you don't know what you're doing to set it up, or the onboard Wifi is bad. I haven't actually tried it now in 6 months so maybe things are better, especially on the Quest2. It was still a good experience (I played Alyx mostly this way), but I found the latency noticeable. I don't think any high level beat saber player would use Virtual Desktop, for example - and I'd say that is the golden bar for a low latency experience. It's what Carmack uses to latency check the Oculus headsets himself.

That's what I am saying. I think there was something wrong with your Virtual desktop settings. You might notice latency on the higher levels of Beat Saber with Virtual desktop, but you shouldn't notice any lag on games like Half Life Alyx. And even if you do notice it on Beat Saber, it shouldn't be terrible, you should still be able to complete levels even on Expert plus. Had you the VR bitrate set too high? Just you said you maxed everything. Anything over 100Mbs and you are going really increase your Latency by a lot.

Also, I can't argue with you about Pcie card vs Dedicated router, If I hadn't tried both, I wouldn't believe it either. It's what the Virtual desktop developer recommends and I am sure he has his reasons. He is a very active on Reddit and has his own discord channel. He can probably explain the in and outs of why he recommends a dedicated router.
 
Joined
Nov 13, 2006
Messages
3,042
<snip>

Lastly, getting sick in VR. You have to stop playing once you start feeling sick, and not just stop playing the game, you have to take off the headset and go do something else until the nausea has completely passed away. Long time users are the worst at this. They think they should have their VR legs and they try to keep fighting through the sick feeling. It's the wrong thing to do. The second you start to feel nauseous, take off the headset.
This. As a long time VR player, this is where beginners and even those that have played a bit of VR often mess up and spiral into a nice 2+ hour bout of general misery. When you start to feel ill, stop completely, get up and leave the PC - do something else for a while till it completely passes. I've found that over time, you really do build up and develop VR legs so that you can avoid getting sick... but trying to "power through it" is a sure fire way of just becoming miserable for a few hours.
 

Hakaba

Gawd
Joined
Jul 22, 2013
Messages
875
This. As a long time VR player, this is where beginners and even those that have played a bit of VR often mess up and spiral into a nice 2+ hour bout of general misery. When you start to feel ill, stop completely, get up and leave the PC - do something else for a while till it completely passes. I've found that over time, you really do build up and develop VR legs so that you can avoid getting sick... but trying to "power through it" is a sure fire way of just becoming miserable for a few hours.
That cost me a Rift S sale. I loaned it to a co-worker for 2 weeks (he loves Assetto Corsa). The first week he didn't actually turn on the VR mode, and it looked like a giant monitor to him. Telling him which options to turn on finally got him into the seat of the car. For the second week, he tried to power through motion sickness/nausea. Which led him to dislike VR.
 

///AMG

2[H]4U
Joined
Sep 19, 2012
Messages
3,534
You can actually turn on performance metrics and see what your latency is like.

My Quest 1 with UniFi FlexHDs is between 35-40, I’ve heard the Quest 2 should be between 30-35 with the same equipment. If not, I’ll pickup a dedicated router for it.

Not saying it is perfect, but I can still compete in some expert+ songs online on beat saber. Could also just be getting used to it and adjusting for the delay... Meh.
I'm at 29-35ms with my NanoHD's and Quest 2. I have a Unifi 6 LR on order so I will see if WiFi 6 makes any difference.
 

reaper12

2[H]4U
Joined
Oct 21, 2006
Messages
2,556
I'm at 29-35ms with my NanoHD's and Quest 2. I have a Unifi 6 LR on order so I will see if WiFi 6 makes any difference.

Is that in games or just on the desktop? If it's in game, then that's pretty good (depending on the game of course)
 

SPARTAN VI

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Jun 12, 2004
Messages
7,880
Just tried the virtual desktop streaming and couldn't get rid of the jittery head movement. Tried buffering on/off, tried more latency mode, tried different codecs, tried turning off virtual audio, higher bitrate, lower bitrate, higher resolution, lower resolution, higher framerate, lower framerate, etc. I'm barely 6 feet from my Ubiquiti AmpliFi Alien router on a dedicated 5GHz band. It's barely what I'd consider playable only because the jitter makes me nauseated pretty quickly.
 

reaper12

2[H]4U
Joined
Oct 21, 2006
Messages
2,556
Just tried the virtual desktop streaming and couldn't get rid of the jittery head movement. Tried buffering on/off, tried more latency mode, tried different codecs, tried turning off virtual audio, higher bitrate, lower bitrate, higher resolution, lower resolution, higher framerate, lower framerate, etc. I'm barely 6 feet from my Ubiquiti AmpliFi Alien router on a dedicated 5GHz band. It's barely what I'd consider playable only because the jitter makes me nauseated pretty quickly.

There is a setting in Virtual Desktop called performance Overlay. It shows the latency and framerate. Enable it and check to see where the problems are.

Also when you start Virtual desktop what is it showing for the connection mbs at the top of the window.
 

SPARTAN VI

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Jun 12, 2004
Messages
7,880
There is a setting in Virtual Desktop called performance Overlay. It shows the latency and framerate. Enable it and check to see where the problems are.

Also when you start Virtual desktop what is it showing for the connection mbs at the top of the window.
Yep, saw that it's over 5GHz since I setup a dedicated 5GHz SSID for the Quest 2. Bandwidth is about 800Mbps. I did enable the overlay and saw latency between 40-60ms at worst. About 10-20ms of that alone was from network latency. I can't really say it's a latency issue though, it's really only the head tracking that seemed jittery to me. Turning my head side to side seemed okay, but physically strafing/tilting it would cause nauseating jitter.
 
Last edited:

TwistedMetalGear

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Jun 19, 2005
Messages
1,856
Virtual Desktop has noticeable input delay. Not sure if anyone has measured it or not. Wireless freedom is a great thing, but it must be adding at least 50-100ms.
It's nowhere near 50-100 if you are configured properly and have good hardware. It's more in the 20s - 30s. I was surprised at just how good it is. I sometimes peak out of the nose recess just to see how far my VR hands trail behind my arms as I swing them and yeah there's a very slight lag but it's barely even noticeable. I'd say Virtual Desktop is perfect for a vast majority of gamers out there. It's only those top 1% who dedicate their lives to things like beat saber expert + that should look elsewhere.

https://www.overclockers.co.uk/forums/threads/quest-2-virtual-desktop-performance-thread.18902756/
 
  • Like
Reactions: hhkb
like this

MaZa

2[H]4U
Joined
Sep 21, 2008
Messages
3,198
Yep, saw that it's over 5GHz since I setup a dedicated 5GHz SSID for the Quest 2. Bandwidth is about 800Mbps. I did enable the overlay and saw latency between 40-60ms at worst. About 10-20ms of that alone was from network latency. I can't really say it's a latency issue though, it's really only the head tracking that seemed jittery to me. Turning my head side to side seemed okay, but physically strafing/tilting it would cause nauseating jitter.

Wait, is the problem when you move your character with the controller and your hands that get stuttery, or is is the headtracking meaning when you are looking around yourself? 🤔
 

reaper12

2[H]4U
Joined
Oct 21, 2006
Messages
2,556
Yep, saw that it's over 5GHz since I setup a dedicated 5GHz SSID for the Quest 2. Bandwidth is about 800Mbps. I did enable the overlay and saw latency between 40-60ms at worst. About 10-20ms of that alone was from network latency. I can't really say it's a latency issue though, it's really only the head tracking that seemed jittery to me. Turning my head side to side seemed okay, but physically strafing/tilting it would cause nauseating jitter.

It shouldn't be like that though. There shouldn't be any jitter. What's your GPU? What game did you try? When you say you have a dedicated 5Ghz SSID for the quest 2, do you another 5Ghz SSID for other devices?
 

SPARTAN VI

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Jun 12, 2004
Messages
7,880
Wait, is the problem when you move your character with the controller and your hands that get stuttery, or is is the headtracking meaning when you are looking around yourself? 🤔
Headtracking, as in when I move my physical head/body.

It shouldn't be like that though. There shouldn't be any jitter. What's your GPU? What game did you try? When you say you have a dedicated 5Ghz SSID for the quest 2, do you another 5Ghz SSID for other devices?
Using a RTX 3070 Founders. And yes, we have another 5GHz band for anything else. Both were set to channel 36 and 80MHz bandwidth. There's no congestion on 5GHz in my area, I'm the only one on channel 36 when checking WiFi Analyzer / inSSIDer. I'm considering setting them up to 40MHz each then move them to separate channels, but it doesn't look like the AmpliFi software allows me to configure them individually like that.
 
Last edited:

MaZa

2[H]4U
Joined
Sep 21, 2008
Messages
3,198
Headtracking, as in when I move my physical head/body.

That is odd. No idea what could be causing that. How are the latencies? And I do not mean the overall latencies, VD overlay should so individual latencies for game, network etc...
 

TwistedMetalGear

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Jun 19, 2005
Messages
1,856
Yep, saw that it's over 5GHz since I setup a dedicated 5GHz SSID for the Quest 2. Bandwidth is about 800Mbps. I did enable the overlay and saw latency between 40-60ms at worst. About 10-20ms of that alone was from network latency. I can't really say it's a latency issue though, it's really only the head tracking that seemed jittery to me. Turning my head side to side seemed okay, but physically strafing/tilting it would cause nauseating jitter.
I actually get this too. Have you confirmed that it's only a problem on Virtual Desktop? I don't have a link cable, so I can't compare the two.
 

SPARTAN VI

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Jun 12, 2004
Messages
7,880
I actually get this too. Have you confirmed that it's only a problem on Virtual Desktop? I don't have a link cable, so I can't compare the two.
I have a link cable too, which works perfectly fine. No jitter.

That is odd. No idea what could be causing that. How are the latencies? And I do not mean the overall latencies, VD overlay should so individual latencies for game, network etc...
I'll have to check it again, but the network latency was 10-20ms in the VD overlay.
 

///AMG

2[H]4U
Joined
Sep 19, 2012
Messages
3,534
Network latency for me is 9-10ms for my NanoHD in game. H.264 is slightly better on latency than HEVC the quest 2 takes 5ms~ more to decode HEVC than h.264, my 3080 encode latency goes down maybe 1-2ms as well. Overall latency is 19ms in desktop, 25-35 in game with h.264. My NanoHD's are on the ceiling in every room I played with it in.
 

reaper12

2[H]4U
Joined
Oct 21, 2006
Messages
2,556
Headtracking, as in when I move my physical head/body.


Using a RTX 3070 Founders. And yes, we have another 5GHz band for anything else. Both were set to channel 36 and 80MHz bandwidth. There's no congestion on 5GHz in my area, I'm the only one on channel 36 when checking WiFi Analyzer / inSSIDer. I'm considering setting them up to 40MHz each then move them to separate channels, but it doesn't look like the AmpliFi software allows me to configure them individually like that.

Sorry for late reply.

Does it make any difference if you play Steam Games or Oculus Games?
In the Virtual Streamer have you made sure "Automatically Adjust Bitrate" is unticked?

In Virtual desktop try the following settings. With your GPU there should work well for you.

Use H.264 codec.
VR Bitrate - 90Mbs.
VR Graphic High
Frame rate - 90fps.
Sliced encoding - on.

You can adjust these later if you want. It's just for the troubleshooting.

If you are still getting Jitter after this, then it's your Network setup.

What I would do is kick every 5Ghz device off the network, remove the other 5ghz SSIDs and just have one band and one SSID and only connect your Quest 2 to it. Then check your games.
 

SPARTAN VI

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Jun 12, 2004
Messages
7,880
Sorry for late reply.

Does it make any difference if you play Steam Games or Oculus Games?
In the Virtual Streamer have you made sure "Automatically Adjust Bitrate" is unticked?

In Virtual desktop try the following settings. With your GPU there should work well for you.

Use H.264 codec.
VR Bitrate - 90Mbs.
VR Graphic High
Frame rate - 90fps.
Sliced encoding - on.

You can adjust these later if you want. It's just for the troubleshooting.

If you are still getting Jitter after this, then it's your Network setup.

What I would do is kick every 5Ghz device off the network, remove the other 5ghz SSIDs and just have one band and one SSID and only connect your Quest 2 to it. Then check your games.
NP, thanks for trying to help but I'm thinking it's going to come down to Oculus themselves releasing something like this that's turn key and officially supported. Yep, got jitter with both Oculus games (First Contact) and SteamVR games (VR Home and Phasmophobia). Tried the above settings too. When I was first attempting this, I originally had a single 5GHz band. I opened up a dedicated 5GHz band later to see if that would help. I'm just going to refund Virtual Desktop because I'm satisfied with how the Oculus Link cable is working, although it would be neat to have this working in the bedroom too (where the 2nd AmpliFi router is).
 

LGabrielPhoto

2[H]4U
Joined
Jan 5, 2006
Messages
3,099
For those who do, what do you use for earsbuds/headphones? Ideally something that's purpose built for VR so there's no wire management. The on-strap speakers are okay, especially if I throw a hoodie on over my head, but sometimes I want to play at night without making a bunch of noise.

I saw Logitech has a G333 VR-ready earbud set, but $50 is quite pricey for what's essentially a set of earbuds with a shortened cable. Also found these cheapo $14 buds, but IME you get what you pay for too.
For headphones by far my favorite is the Skullcandy Crusher EVO as i can adjust the bass when i want that visceral impact that complements the immersion levels of VR perfectly.
Feeling the rattle of shots in Roborecall for exame is epic
Now i just need to order my bHaptics to be complete.
 

TwistedMetalGear

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Jun 19, 2005
Messages
1,856
This might be more of a general VR question, but how is it that turning my head IRL translates to extremely smooth turning in game whereas turning with the thumbstick reveals a lower frame rate? I mean I'm sure the frame rate is the same regardless of turning method used, but how is it that physically turning my head looks so smooth as compared to the thumbstick?
 

GreenOrbs

Gawd
Joined
Jun 7, 2017
Messages
585
This might be more of a general VR question, but how is it that turning my head IRL translates to extremely smooth turning in game whereas turning with the thumbstick reveals a lower frame rate? I mean I'm sure the frame rate is the same regardless of turning method used, but how is it that physically turning my head looks so smooth as compared to the thumbstick?
I'm just speculating here but some games use snap turning when using the thumbsticks to try to reduce nausea. This involves instantly turning a set angle repeatedly rather than a smooth scroll. Sometimes you can change the settings. Wouldn't expect a significant impact on frame rate between the two. If you have it set on smooth rather than snap turning on the thumbstick, I have no idea what's causing it.
 
Last edited:

Chief Blur Buster

Owner of BlurBusters
Joined
Aug 18, 2017
Messages
94
This might be more of a general VR question, but how is it that turning my head IRL translates to extremely smooth turning in game whereas turning with the thumbstick reveals a lower frame rate? I mean I'm sure the frame rate is the same regardless of turning method used, but how is it that physically turning my head looks so smooth as compared to the thumbstick?
1. Turning head IRL is smooth
2. Turning head in VR is smooth

But if you use your thumbstick with smooth-turn, it's equivalent to using a thumbstick to control a dizzy rotating IRL platform under your feet (Smooth-turning the environment without turning your head). That's why thumbstick smooth-turn is disabled by default in most games.

Pretend you built a spinning platform under your feet IRL. Controlled by a thumbstick to control the rotation of the platform under you. You WILL get dizzy if you are not used to it! That's what smooth-turn feels like to many people including me.

Similar dizzy problem in VR, except without the G-forces of spinning (but you still get dizzy in VR because of vertigo sync issue).

So that's why they intentionally by default "lower the frame rate" of turning in VR in instant-rotation steps to solve the dizzy-problem. Nausea-wise, this is WHY it is often better to use real headturning in VR instead of thumbstick-controlled head turning. However, some people learn to get used to this (getting their "VR legs").

Personally, I am now tolerant of smooth locomotion, but I get instantly dizzy with smooth turns.

So I turn on smooth locomotion, but I always keep low frame rate snap-turn (VR games do this as intentional dizzy-proofing)

Everybody is different when it comes to VR. Also, some people can't tolerate ANY kind of thumbstick turning, Instead, such people can set up a roomscale and simply use their head/body to turn instead, never using thumbstick to turn. Keeping perfect 1:1 vertigo sync to stay comfortable.
 
Last edited:

Chief Blur Buster

Owner of BlurBusters
Joined
Aug 18, 2017
Messages
94
It doesn't make sense why this would be worse than a dedicated router

<Advanced Technical Explanation>

A dedicated router is good. WiFi drivers running in the background of a computer, can be bogged down by a busy system (busy CPU). Plus the WiFi chips themselves can have less speedy processing.

Gigabit ethernet ports usually have lower Windows driver processing overhead requirements than WiFi ports. With your CPU cycles busy on the game, means fewer cycles for flawless network processing. Also, even without the CPU, the WiFi processing on motherboards are cheaper than the WiFi processing in high-end gaming routers.

Modern WiFi packets use extremely advanced processor-intensive error correction called low density parity checks (LDPC) -- not to mention WPA2/WPA3 encryption -- the combination of which used to require a supercomputer just thirty years ago!! The WiFi LDPC decoding latency adds multiple milliseconds on many cheap low-power WiFi chips!

There's many research papers about using GPUs to accelerate LDPC decoding. Imagine how much work a WiFi chip is doing!! So, outsource WiFi processing to an expensive gaming router, one of those powerful multigigahertz multicore MIMO 8-antenna gaming routers with what essentially has an almost-overclocked WiFi-processing chipset (doing nothing, no Netflix, no downloads, just only one connection to VR headset), and your wireless PC VR streaming experience skyrockets in reliability/consistency/quality.

For example, decoding one 11ac or 11ax WiFi packet requires many orders more computing power (for just that packet alone) than the Apollo 11 Moon Mission combined (several days from from launch to landing)!

Now it's just a bunch of few square millimeters on a WiFi chip. But that processing takes a finite amount of time. Cheaper and lower-power WiFi chips might take 5ms longer than the best high-end higher-clockrate dedicated WiFi chips built into a dedicated gaming router. Motherboard doesn't have $300 worth of WiFi processing power.

You're simply outsourcing 100% of your WiFi-related processing to be 100% independent of your computer load. With the powerful gigahertz-scale multicore processors of a dedicated router, you can have less latency AND less network jitter AND fewer VR stutters. I've been able to play with a decicated WiFi router with zero stutter (not a single frame drop) for relatively long periods of gameplay, provided the router was in the same room and not shared by other bandwidth and no interference was occuring. I was able to get below 30ms lag with a $300 gaming router not being used for anything else.

Also, the MU-MIMO 8-antennas (beam forming) are like a basic phased array that steers its beam in real time to your exact location of your Quest 2 headset in the room, so as you turn, move, gyrate, swing, jump, the stutters don't occur like it might otherwise occur with those latency-impacting bitrate change (switching between 432 Mbps and 864 Mbps has a tiny latency pause that can create stutter) or those random signal fluctuations as your headset gets blocked by your head as you turn away from router, etc. You want it perpetually 864 Mbps, and perpetually using less than 10% of the bandwidth, for zero-millisecond WiFi jitter too. And no contention with any devices (nobody using Netflix or Internet on the same WiFi router).

It's brute overkill, but extra millisecond of WiFi driver processing latency can create extra lag or extra stutter in some cases.

That said, good onboard WiFi can do just fine -- it's not too shabby. Some are very good indeed. But what this means is what you deem "good" may still be 5ms laggier than a dedicated WiFi router, even if there's zero stutter. LDPC/encryption decoding latency being outsourced, yadda, yadda.

Some people find it worthwhile to spend extra money to save 10ms-20ms WiFi latency through a combination of dedicated router + GPU upgrade + bitrate adjustment. Lag savings can all add up quite a bit. 10ms less lag can mean the difference between being tired after 1 hour, versus no nausea after 3 hours in playing Half Life: Alyx.

Your VR nausea onset is slower if one can afford to invest more money in getting the lowest possible wireless latency.

Just putting priorities in perspective. If you're a GTX 1060 user who just barely can afford a Quest 2 64GB, then onboard WiFi is fine. But for other people who happily paid scalper-overpriced RTX 3090 for a pimped-out Quest 2 256GB with the comfort strap, why settle for onboard motherboard WiFi? Those other people are literally metaphorically putting used $50 tires on their Ferrari. Milliseconds matters for nausea here. Pamper it properly with dedicated supercomputer WiFi separate of your main Internet router.

What's being done inside an 11ac/ax WiFi modem chip is nothing short of jawdropping.

</Advanced Technical Explanation>
 
Last edited:

TwistedMetalGear

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Jun 19, 2005
Messages
1,856
Sorry I don't think I was clear. Let me rephrase. Suppose I'm running a graphically intense game (FS2020 for example). Actual frame rate is in the 30s. When I rotate my head IRL, my surroundings "flow" into the headset super smooth. I don't perceive any skipping of frames despite the game running at 30 fps. It feels like a full 90 fps when I rotate my head. On the other hand, all other motion that isn't a head rotation (panning, strafing, walking around, thumbstick rotations, objects passing in front of my face, etc...) reveal the true 30 fps.
 

MaZa

2[H]4U
Joined
Sep 21, 2008
Messages
3,198
Sorry I don't think I was clear. Let me rephrase. Suppose I'm running a graphically intense game (FS2020 for example). Actual frame rate is in the 30s. When I rotate my head IRL, my surroundings "flow" into the headset super smooth. I don't perceive any skipping of frames despite the game running at 30 fps. It feels like a full 90 fps when I rotate my head. On the other hand, all other motion that isn't a head rotation (panning, strafing, walking around, thumbstick rotations, objects passing in front of my face, etc...) reveal the true 30 fps.

I do not know the technical details, but somehow the headtracking is separated from the game framerate. Even if your game is a stuttery mess the headtracking is still smooth. No idea how it is done but this is how it is designed to work to avoid player projectile vomiting.
 

GreenOrbs

Gawd
Joined
Jun 7, 2017
Messages
585
Sorry I don't think I was clear. Let me rephrase. Suppose I'm running a graphically intense game (FS2020 for example). Actual frame rate is in the 30s. When I rotate my head IRL, my surroundings "flow" into the headset super smooth. I don't perceive any skipping of frames despite the game running at 30 fps. It feels like a full 90 fps when I rotate my head. On the other hand, all other motion that isn't a head rotation (panning, strafing, walking around, thumbstick rotations, objects passing in front of my face, etc...) reveal the true 30 fps.
https://developer.oculus.com/documentation/native/android/mobile-timewarp-overview/ If your real FPS is really low like you are mentioning... Oculus does frame smoothing based on the head tracking data. They make one or more fake frames per real frame. Its most effective when you are just making rotational changes from a fixed perspective. Panning, strafing, walking around etc require perspective and geometric changes that are less easy to process. ASW does apply to those but not as well.
 

Chief Blur Buster

Owner of BlurBusters
Joined
Aug 18, 2017
Messages
94
Sorry I don't think I was clear. Let me rephrase. Suppose I'm running a graphically intense game (FS2020 for example). Actual frame rate is in the 30s. When I rotate my head IRL, my surroundings "flow" into the headset super smooth. I don't perceive any skipping of frames despite the game running at 30 fps. It feels like a full 90 fps when I rotate my head. On the other hand, all other motion that isn't a head rotation (panning, strafing, walking around, thumbstick rotations, objects passing in front of my face, etc...) reveal the true 30 fps.
I do not know the technical details, but somehow the headtracking is separated from the game framerate. Even if your game is a stuttery mess the headtracking is still smooth. No idea how it is done but this is how it is designed to work to avoid player projectile vomiting.

Oh! That.

VR games are often capable of multiple frame rates concurrently; high frame rates for head turning versus low frame rates for the 3D objects themselves.

This is because of warping or reprojection technology (some of us call it "Frame Rate Amplification Technologies"; google that) such as Oculus ASW 2.0, or the HTC/Valve equivalents. It's a low-lag descendant of old-fashioned interpolation.

This keeps head turning frame rate higher than the underlying frame rate, reducing nausea.

Eventually, over the long term, frame rate amplification technologies will be used in more gaming/VR software to decouple effective frame rate from underlying full GPU-render frame rate, in a perceptually lossless manner. I also want to see more of this VR technology to arrive on desktop gaming, especially 100fps framerate-amplified to 1000fps for future 1000Hz monitors -- and apply to everything (physics, objects, turning, etc) so that the underlying real frame rate is not revealed. Perhaps a future DLSS 3.0 or DLSS 4.0 or the AMD equivalent.

Metaphorically, the decoupling of multiple frame rates is hierarchically sort of like how MPEG2 / H.264 works -- much how Netflix is only 1 frame per second of a full non-interpolated non-estimated frames (P-Frames), with the rest of 23 frames per second interpolated (I-Frames, B-Frames). But we can't tell apart the real frames from the estimated/predicted frames (some say "fake frames"). It is a hallmark of modern video compression, and some of the motion vector technology is slowly being added to 3D rendering -- you're witnessing this with head turning in VR. Basically head turning data feeds the warping/reprojection engine to allow creating new frames that aren't full 3D renders.

This is not your grandpa's Motionflow TV interpolation; it's some pretty neat stuff going on in VR.
 
Last edited:

LGabrielPhoto

2[H]4U
Joined
Jan 5, 2006
Messages
3,099
Hey guys,
Just wondering what kind of performance you guys get when running Aircar via PCLink and via Virtual Desktop?
 

Hakaba

Gawd
Joined
Jul 22, 2013
Messages
875
A8580F16-3DE0-462C-8115-55A13B37AFB9.jpeg

Waiting on VR Cover to get here. The UniFi FlexHD get me into the 20s for several games and low 30s for others.

Manufacture date 12/20, haven’t seen any issues so far.
 
Joined
Apr 14, 2006
Messages
534
Hey all! I was just wondering do i get the 64gig or the 256gig? All i plan to use this on is iracing an MSFS2000. Thank you for all the input!
 

MaZa

2[H]4U
Joined
Sep 21, 2008
Messages
3,198
Hey all! I was just wondering do i get the 64gig or the 256gig? All i plan to use this on is iracing an MSFS2000. Thank you for all the input!

64 then. 256 is relevant only if you plan on filling it with standalone games, movies and whatever and have them in hand all the time without redownloading.
 
Joined
Apr 14, 2006
Messages
534
Can someone recommend a link cable from amazon that is known to work. Is there any other add-ons you would recommend i get i will be useing the strictly for Iracing an MSFS2020. Thanks all!
 

MaZa

2[H]4U
Joined
Sep 21, 2008
Messages
3,198
Can someone recommend a link cable from amazon that is known to work. Is there any other add-ons you would recommend i get i will be useing the strictly for Iracing an MSFS2020. Thanks all!

Cable Matters active cable for Quest works fine here.
 

equinox654

Limp Gawd
Joined
Apr 7, 2005
Messages
402
Just a heads up... HEVC is working better for me than h.264 on the quest 2 with a 3080.
Seems to be the consensus on the virtual desktop discord as well.

HEVC doesn't need as high of a bit rate to get the same quality. 70mbit with hevc looks as good as 150mbit h.264 to me. Noticed slightly lower latency since the bit rate was lower. Encode and decode went up like 1ms but the network latency dropped and seemed more consistent. Reducing most of the stutters that I would get. (which weren't alot)
 

Tengis

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Jun 11, 2003
Messages
5,146
The novelty of VR in my family wore off inside of a month. The games/content are too expensive to try everything and see what is the most fun.

I need to play Half Life Alyx and see what all the fuss is about.
 

Kardonxt

2[H]4U
Joined
Apr 13, 2009
Messages
3,369
You definitely need to find the right games. We started with Beat Saber because that's what all of our friends were into and quickly became bored of it. I picked up Robo Recall and the headset gets way more use now. I setup Virtual Desktop but haven't actually messed with it yet. I need to get out my racing wheel to try some racing sims but that seems like too much work.

Half Life Alyx will be next after that.
 

workshop35

Gawd
Joined
Nov 24, 2013
Messages
657
The novelty of VR in my family wore off inside of a month. The games/content are too expensive to try everything and see what is the most fun.

I need to play Half Life Alyx and see what all the fuss is about.
Alyx is hands down the best VR game made imo. You won't be disappointed
 

sharknice

2[H]4U
Joined
Nov 12, 2012
Messages
2,318
If you're into competitive multiplayer there are plenty of good games including free ones. You're not going to get bored.

If you're only into the flavor of the week multiplayer games or single player games you're going to be spending a lot of money and there isn't as much content yet as there are for flat games.
 
Top