Best quiet 140mm case fans?

Kwaz

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I have Noctua, Cougar and Corsair fans mostly. I'd rate them exactly in that order.

Noctua is second to none. Supposedly EKWB fans are good, but they've had too many recalls for my taste - fan recalls, AIO recalls, issues with plating and relational recalls. No thanks. Be Quiet is supposedly a decent fan. Though I'd place Cougar over them. On the cheap end Corsair and NZXT fans are supposed to be alright.

There are some other boutique brands out there, but they aren't quite the as good as noctua in some way whether it be cooling performance, warranty, service or build quality.
 

doyll

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And you have data to back that up? None of the cases I've bought in the last 5 years have restrictive grills. Exhaust fans don't even have filters. A fan that works well on a radiator or heatsink generally have higher static pressure. I haven't seen a single shred of data that higher static pressure fans yield better thermals for components in a case when use as case fans at a given noise level.
I don't need data to prove it is true. You are the one basically saying it's not true, so;
Do you have any data to back up your assumption it is not?
I know you do not or I would not even ask if I did. You would have posted it to prove me wrong. :D
The only way for them to not be restrictive is if there are no grills. For example a hexagonal (honeycomb) pattern grill with 4.5mm hex and 5mm pattern (0.5mm hex frame pieces) punched metal grill only has 81% of it's area open .. that is 19% of it's open area blocked.
Round hole punched metal grills are much more restrictive. A round hole grill with 4.8mm holes in a 6.4mm offset pattern only as 49% of it's area open .. that is 51% of it's open area blocked.

Do you know what the defintion of 'static pressure' is?
"Static Pressure" is the pressure level when fan stops flowing air.
In free air a fan rated at 80cfm and 0.60mm H2O will flow 80cfm of air.
But if there is 0.60mm H2O of resistance it will flow no air. That is the level of resistance at which it stops flowing air .. by definition of what static pressure rating is.

In free air a fan rated at 80cfm and 1.60mm H2O will flow 80cmf of air.
But if there is 0.60mm H2O of resistance on this fan it will still be flowing about 50-55cfm .. because it can overcome another 1.0mm H2O of resistance before it stops flowing air.

Often higher pressure fans make a little more noise at same rpm, but the fact that our use of fans always has some resistance involved means they can deliver as much air than lower resistance fans and do it at lower rpm levles .. and delivering more air with less noise it what is important, not how much noise they make at a given rpm.

Go to Thermaltech website and look at the noise to rpm and airflow to rpm graphs for different fans. Then compare the airflow to noise graph to these. I think you will see why I posted airlfow to noise graphs of fans on radiator instead of rpm graph. ;)
 
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rat

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I have Noctua, Cougar and Corsair fans mostly. I'd rate them exactly in that order.

Noctua is second to none.
They really are. I have 92mm Noctua fans that move more air and are quieter than pretty fuckin' pricey 120mm fans. They're fantastic. I don't even mind the silly color of their trademark fans anymore, they're just THAT good.

So that brings up a question - do you guys usually pull in from the top and blow out the side? Pulling cool air in onto the GPU seems like the best option and then exhausting out the top (heat rising and all), but it seems like intake from the side panel isn't great for a quiet setup.
It really depends on a couple of things, the biggest factor being case size, IMHO. Larger cases will need more or larger fans to generate as much flow.

I have a side window mounted fan that blows directly at the GPU and a fan at the top of the case blowing down directly into the CPU sink. So I do the exact thing you're trying to avoid. I did the front 140mm fan thing with my case and the temps SUCKED. Had better luck blowing directly at the GPU instead.

Due to the substantial heat reduction due to switching from a GTX 580 OC to a GTX 970 OC ITX, I was able to remove the two 80mm slim fans without any temp increase. (They're still installed in the pics)

Imgur: The most awesome images on the Internet

The 140mm intake was centered between the GPU and CPU with the CPU fans pointed towards the top of the case. It just didn't seem to cool as well as the way I have it now despite being in-front out-top.

Experimented with a side intake fan setup and it was much better. IMHO it's because of the shorter distance before the fan hits an object to cool.

I find more often than not... most cases with the standard placement of fan mounts... aren't always the best places to put fans. Too many cases have large areas where there's too long of a distance to throw air. Putting fans closer to components and blowing directly at them just seems to work better. Sometimes that means a slight bit more noise because it's on the side panel instead of in the front.
 
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doyll

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I have Noctua, Cougar and Corsair fans mostly. I'd rate them exactly in that order.

Noctua is second to none. Supposedly EKWB fans are good, but they've had too many recalls for my taste - fan recalls, AIO recalls, issues with plating and relational recalls. No thanks. Be Quiet is supposedly a decent fan. Though I'd place Cougar over them. On the cheap end Corsair and NZXT fans are supposed to be alright.

There are some other boutique brands out there, but they aren't quite the as good as noctua in some way whether it be cooling performance, warranty, service or build quality.
While Noc fans are generally good, the are also quite expensive. Check out Thermalright TY-14x series and Phanteks fans. They are very similar to Nocs in preformance and noise levels and generally cost about 25-40% less money.
 

Kwaz

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While Noc fans are generally good, the are also quite expensive. Check out Thermalright TY-14x series and Phanteks fans. They are very similar to Nocs in preformance and noise levels and generally cost about 25-40% less money.
Yeah, the Noctua fans are expensive. I forgot about Phanteks - I don't think they're very focused on fan development though. Thermalright is pretty new. I don't know much about them.

I have a few of the 140mm iPPC IP67 versions. They will definitely take a bite into your pocket book. In the long run I suppose they'll pay off. It's serious overkill here and now, but in the long run perhaps they will pay for themselves.
 

Zarathustra[H]

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Yeah, the Noctua fans are expensive. I forgot about Phanteks - I don't think they're very focused on fan development though. Thermalright is pretty new. I don't know much about them.

I have a few of the 140mm iPPC IP67 versions. They will definitely take a bite into your pocket book. In the long run I suppose they'll pay off. It's serious overkill here and now, but in the long run perhaps they will pay for themselves.

I'm curious. Why did you go with the IP67 over the IP52 versions? Do you require water resistance?

My thought process is if I ever have enough water in my case to require IP67 (or even IP52) fans, I have MUCH bigger problems to worry about.
 

doyll

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Yeah, the Noctua fans are expensive. I forgot about Phanteks - I don't think they're very focused on fan development though. Thermalright is pretty new. I don't know much about them.

I have a few of the 140mm iPPC IP67 versions. They will definitely take a bite into your pocket book. In the long run I suppose they'll pay off. It's serious overkill here and now, but in the long run perhaps they will pay for themselves.
Phanteks is rather new to the industry with first release being the PH-TC14PE coole.
Thermalright has been around for a long time, like turn of the century. :D Their TY-14x series fan are known to perform the same as nocs of same blade design .. same design as A15 and your IPPC fans. But they only recently started making square versions in 300-1300rpm and 550-2500rpm models. You can look on Thermalbench and see how they compare to your IPPC fans.

Thermalright TY-143 SQ 140 mm fan

And they are not near as expensive. Here they are about 16.00 euro compared to IPPCs about being about 27.00 euro.
 

Stereodude

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I don't need data to prove it is true. You are the one basically saying it's not true, so;
Do you have any data to back up your assumption it is not?
I know you do not or I would not even ask if I did. You would have posted it to prove me wrong. :D
So you make a claim that a certain type of fan is better even when being used as a case fan (not the intended application). I ask you for the data to back up that claim. Of course tou don't have any. But say instead I have to come up with data to prove you wrong? I don't think so. That's not how logic works. You make the claim, you back it up.

Edit: If what you're saying is universally true and accepted like you want to pretend why are companies selling fans optimized for case fan duty with lower static pressures instead of only selling their heatsink and radiator models with higher static pressure since those are so much better as case fans?
 
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Zarathustra[H]

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So that brings up a question - do you guys usually pull in from the top and blow out the side? Pulling cool air in onto the GPU seems like the best option and then exhausting out the top (heat rising and all), but it seems like intake from the side panel isn't great for a quiet setup.
People say pulling in through radiators is the way to do it, and that this results in lower temps, but I just can't make myself do it.

The thought of forcing hot air that naturally by convection wants to go upwards, down through my top radiator just feels too wrong to me.

My fan setup is thus an unusual one.

I have a triple 140mm rad up top with three Noctual Industrial 2000rpm pwm fans pushing out through the top of the case

I also have an extra thick (Alphacool Monsta) dual 140mm radiator up front with four 140mm Noctua Industrial 2000rpm PWM fans in push-pull Since I don't want the hot air from this radiator escaping through the radiator up top, I have reversed the direction from the normal flow direction, and blow these out of the case as well.

Because of this, I have reversed the rear 140mm exhaust (also the same noctua) fan, to instead blow air into the case and put a smaller 120mm industrial pwm Noctua as an intake in one of the two bottom slots (the big front radiator blocks the other one) to help compbat the negative pressure I see in the case as a result of my radiator fan orientations.


Most water coolers will tell you this is WRONG, but I'm not so sure.

There are two main reasons for the "push air in, not out" philosophy.

Firstly, it was recommended by all the AIO water coolers for best performance, as you want cold outside air flowing through your radiator, rather than warm inside air. But with a custom water loop, and fans blowing heat out, most of what produces heat is already being exhausted, so I don't think in my case this makes a big difference, as inside the case temps, are going to be pretty damned close to outside the case temps.

Secondly, it has to do with dust. If you only have enough intake fans to create a positive pressure in the case, air will only come in through your fan spots, and just vent out wherever it can, so you can put dust filters on your fans, and greatly reduce the amount of dust that winds up in your case.

Thing is, I've been running negative pressure for a long time now, and I don't have a case dust problem. Maybe me office is just clean?

Anyway, so long story short, not everyone is pulling air in through radiators.

I probably would if my case orientation were different, and I wasn't using a top radiator, but since I am, this is what works for me, and I get good temps this way.

Could I get better temps by switching them around? Maybe. But as it stands, I have my fans pwm adjusted based on the water temp. If it hits 32, they go up to 100%, but that never happens.

The water temps usually hover at or just below 30C, even at load, without sending the fans into jet engine mode. I usually wind up getting about a 5.7C delta T (ambient to water) without it getting too noisy, unless the ambient temp in the office goes way up.
 

Kwaz

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I'm curious. Why did you go with the IP67 over the IP52 versions? Do you require water resistance?

My thought process is if I ever have enough water in my case to require IP67 (or even IP52) fans, I have MUCH bigger problems to worry about.
It wasn't that much more for IP67 and I figured if it's sealed for water and better sealed for dust it'll be better off long term.

The first number of an IP rating is the dust resistance. The second number is the water resistance.

For the IP67 you get

  • Solids - Level 6 dust protection where "No ingress of dust; complete protection against contact." vs IP52 with Level 5 dust protection where "Ingress of dust is not entirely prevented, but it must not enter in sufficient quantity to interfere with the satisfactory operation of the equipment; complete protection against contact."
  • Liquids - Level 7 protection where "Ingress of water in harmful quantity shall not be possible when the enclosure is immersed in water under defined conditions of pressure and time (up to 1 m of submersion)." vs IP52 with Level 2 protection where "Vertically dripping water shall have no harmful effect when the enclosure is tilted at an angle up to 15° from its normal position."
It's really the complete dust protection which sells it. Definitely don't have any plans on taking this rig for a swim anytime soon.

Phanteks is rather new to the industry with first release being the PH-TC14PE coole.
Thermalright has been around for a long time, like turn of the century. :D Their TY-14x series fan are known to perform the same as nocs of same blade design .. same design as A15 and your IPPC fans. But they only recently started making square versions in 300-1300rpm and 550-2500rpm models. You can look on Thermalbench and see how they compare to your IPPC fans.

Thermalright TY-143 SQ 140 mm fan

And they are not near as expensive. Here they are about 16.00 euro compared to IPPCs about being about 27.00 euro.
There are certainly fans that offer equal performance. But lifespan, warranty / service, and degradation also come into play. The Noctua Industrial PPC fans cost more because they offer more in other areas while being equal, very close to, or better than competition performance wise.

One thing that I've noticed is that Noctua is one of the few companies to pay a lot of attention to noise profile and the tone of the noise not just dB (how loud it is).
 

doyll

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So you make a claim that a certain type of fan is better even when being used as a case fan (not the intended application). I ask you for the data to back up that claim. Of course tou don't have any. But say instead I have to come up with data to prove you wrong? I don't think so. That's not how logic works. You make the claim, you back it up.

Edit: If what you're saying is universally true and accepted like you want to pretend why are companies selling fans optimized for case fan duty with lower static pressures instead of only selling their heatsink and radiator models with higher static pressure since those are so much better as case fans?
I said fans with more static pressure will move more air through grills and fitlters. They have more ability to overcome resistance, and that is a fact. The data verifying what I said is readily avialable from any number of testing and review sites, including Thermalbench which I have posted graphs from in this thread.

Look at fans that come on coolers, then look at same fans selling individually on websites. They are called "cooler fans" when sold wiht cooler and called "case fans" when sold individually. Companies sell to make money. It's "buyer beware" because few of them care if what you are buying is the product that is best for your application.

You replied saying
Stereodude said:
And you have data to back that up? None of the cases I've bought in the last 5 years have restrictive grills. Exhaust fans don't even have filters. A fan that works well on a radiator or heatsink generally have higher static pressure. I haven't seen a single shred of data that higher static pressure fans yield better thermals for components in a case when use as case fans at a given noise level. [/QUOTE

You said your case grills have no resistance. But when I pointed out that all grills create resistance and explained the how and why, you don't even acknowlege my reply, but instead attack me for not posting more info proving you wrong about fans and their static pressure ratings. I'm more than willing to help, but I'm not very helpful when someone posts up like you have in your last two posts.
 

Zarathustra[H]

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There are certainly fans that offer equal performance. But lifespan, warranty / service, and degradation also come into play. The Noctua Industrial PPC fans cost more because they offer more in other areas while being equal, very close to, or better than competition performance wise.

One thing that I've noticed is that Noctua is one of the few companies to pay a lot of attention to noise profile and the tone of the noise not just dB (how loud it is).
Longevity is definitely one of the reasons I have heard for going with Noctua Industrial fans. I haven't had mine for long enough (~14 months now?) to be able to leave a personal testimonial to this effect, but I can definitely say I've had Corsair fans that came with their coolers die on me after surprisingly short usage periods in the past.
 

Kwaz

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Longevity is definitely one of the reasons I have heard for going with Noctua Industrial fans. I haven't had mine for long enough (~14 months now?) to be able to leave a personal testimonial to this effect, but I can definitely say I've had Corsair fans that came with their coolers die on me after surprisingly short usage periods in the past.
Yeah I've had both Corsair and Cougar fans be bad from the get go. And A LOT of Antec fans back in the day :D

I have so many Corsair fans from cases. It's ridiculous.

I honestly think that I'm winding down on high performance computers. That or I'd like to focus more on SFF builds. This 750D needs to go :(
 

doyll

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It wasn't that much more for IP67 and I figured if it's sealed for water and better sealed for dust it'll be better off long term.

The first number of an IP rating is the dust resistance. The second number is the water resistance.

For the IP67 you get

  • Solids - Level 6 dust protection where "No ingress of dust; complete protection against contact." vs IP52 with Level 5 dust protection where "Ingress of dust is not entirely prevented, but it must not enter in sufficient quantity to interfere with the satisfactory operation of the equipment; complete protection against contact."
  • Liquids - Level 7 protection where "Ingress of water in harmful quantity shall not be possible when the enclosure is immersed in water under defined conditions of pressure and time (up to 1 m of submersion)." vs IP52 with Level 2 protection where "Vertically dripping water shall have no harmful effect when the enclosure is tilted at an angle up to 15° from its normal position."
It's really the complete dust protection which sells it. Definitely don't have any plans on taking this rig for a swim anytime soon.



There are certainly fans that offer equal performance. But lifespan, warranty / service, and degradation also come into play. The Noctua Industrial PPC fans cost more because they offer more in other areas while being equal, very close to, or better than competition performance wise.

One thing that I've noticed is that Noctua is one of the few companies to pay a lot of attention to noise profile and the tone of the noise not just dB (how loud it is).
Fair points.

But most of our fan problems do not involve dust or liquids getting into them, so paying more for those feature is pretty much a moot issue. Like you say, we don't take them swimming. :D

As for lifespan, I have TY140 fans in both vertical and horizontal applications that have been in 24/7 use for 5 years now with no problems. They only cost 5 euro new when similar Nocs wer costing 14 euro.

Warranty and support are certainly worth considering, and the more a product cost the more important they are. But if a fan has a proven record of dependability it is not an issue to me, especially when these fans are 30-50% lower priced.

Noc noise profiles are generally some of the best, but the TY-14x sereis fans have every bit as good a sound profile.
Here are photoshopped inages of Noctua, Thermalright fans


And here is data comparing their performance.


I hope that is helpful.

There are reviews of TY-147A, TY-147A SQ and TY-143 SQ on Thermalbench with comparisons to other fans.
 

Zarathustra[H]

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Yeah I've had both Corsair and Cougar fans be bad from the get go. And A LOT of Antec fans back in the day :D

I have so many Corsair fans from cases. It's ridiculous.

I honestly think that I'm winding down on high performance computers. That or I'd like to focus more on SFF builds. This 750D needs to go :(

I'm going in the opposite direction. I tried SFF years ago, with those expensive Shuttle custom SFF barebones systems. I wasn't a super early adopter, but I definitely beat the trend on SFF. I liked it at first, but I quickly became more and more frustrated at the lack of expansion. I felt really limited by the small form factor.

Eventually my frustration boiled over, and I picked up a Silverstone Raven RV03 mid tower, which I used until last year when I upgraded to a Corsair 750D, and now I'm wishing I had gotten a 900D or something larger instead.

The space it takes doesn't bother me at all. The case hides under (and to the side of) my desk anyway. In a way, I'd be using MORE space with an SFF case, because now it would have to go on my desk. And when on my desk, fans would be closer to my ears, so noise would be more troublesome to combat, etc. With a larger case you also have more flexibility in parts, and if you want to, MicroATX boards are certainly much cheaper than Mini-ITX ones

So I guess, I feel like I tried SFF, and found it had several drawbacks, and no real benefits. I still use mini-ITX cases for my HTPC's (All Antek ISK 300's) but that's the only place for SFF for me now.
 

doyll

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Just out of curiosity did either of you look at the Phanteks Enthoo Primo? I'm quite impressed with their cases as well as their fans. ;)
 

Kwaz

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Just out of curiosity did either of you look at the Phanteks Enthoo Primo? I'm quite impressed with their cases as well as their fans. ;)
I did. I ended up getting a 600Q thinking it'd be quieter than the 750D and better in line with what I was looking for than the Phanteks Enthoo line. It wasn't so the 600Q now sits in a box. I was particularly looking at an EVOLV. I'm not a fan of windowed cases and per Phanteks the sides aren't interchangeable.

I'm going in the opposite direction. I tried SFF years ago, with those expensive Shuttle custom SFF barebones systems. I wasn't a super early adopter, but I definitely beat the trend on SFF. I liked it at first, but I quickly became more and more frustrated at the lack of expansion. I felt really limited by the small form factor.

Eventually my frustration boiled over, and I picked up a Silverstone Raven RV03 mid tower, which I used until last year when I upgraded to a Corsair 750D, and now I'm wishing I had gotten a 900D or something larger instead.

The space it takes doesn't bother me at all. The case hides under (and to the side of) my desk anyway. In a way, I'd be using MORE space with an SFF case, because now it would have to go on my desk. And when on my desk, fans would be closer to my ears, so noise would be more troublesome to combat, etc. With a larger case you also have more flexibility in parts, and if you want to, MicroATX boards are certainly much cheaper than Mini-ITX ones

So I guess, I feel like I tried SFF, and found it had several drawbacks, and no real benefits. I still use mini-ITX cases for my HTPC's (All Antek ISK 300's) but that's the only place for SFF for me now.
Yes, that's my hindrance as well. I had this system in a 350D for a while. What I liked about it is that airflow was a bit more direct. I've been thinking about swapping it back. The 750D is flippin' heavy. And I reeeeally don't need all the expansion bays. But since I'm running AIO coolers, I'm not sure where all of the tubing would go.
 

Zarathustra[H]

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The 750D is flippin' heavy. And I reeeeally don't need all the expansion bays. But since I'm running AIO coolers, I'm not sure where all of the tubing would go.
Lol. How often do you do case gymnastics that the weight really bothers you? :p

With big radiators and 2L of water in mine, it could definitely be much worse :p

 
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Zarathustra[H]

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I try not to. Spinal injury.

Ah, that stinks. Still though. The only time I move mine is during upgrade time. Lately that's been once or twice a year. I try to make all my upgrades coincide.

Because of this, things like weight and trouble moving it, don't bother me much. I can see where if you had an injury that could be a bit of an issue though.
 

Kwaz

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Ah, that stinks. Still though. The only time I move mine is during upgrade time. Lately that's been once or twice a year. I try to make all my upgrades coincide.

Because of this, things like weight and trouble moving it, don't bother me much. I can see where if you had an injury that could be a bit of an issue though.
Yeah. I've been trying to fix a couple of issues with my 980 Ti. The sheathing of the tubes was coming off and upon taking off the cooler I discovered that part of the die wasn't pasted correctly. Things are better since.

It would be nice to have something smaller! Maybe one of those Corsair cubes. Maybe give the 600Q another go now that the reason for graphics card being above nominal is was found.

Micro ATX is as small as I'd want to go. My hands are WAY too big for an ITX system.
 

kalston

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Yeah, I always wind up with cuts, scratches and hand pain whenever I built an ITX system.
I get that with ATX too lol. I don't have big hands at all but I do have huge heatsinks and fans (since I only do air but want the best, quietest air cooling possible). But yea I did try a small factor case once and when looking at my hands afterwards had a little shock :D

Personally I like Noctua fans in general (have 120 and 140mm ones) although I've found other brands that perform on par with them (for example Noiseblocker is also top notch in my experience). In fact I think I prefer the sound signature of the Noiseblocker ones (subtle difference). Comparing Apples to Apples (same size & RPM). Both of those are EU brands though (Austrian and German), I wouldn't expect them to be very competitive price wise for most of you guys.
 
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Araxie

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So you make a claim that a certain type of fan is better even when being used as a case fan (not the intended application). I ask you for the data to back up that claim. Of course tou don't have any. But say instead I have to come up with data to prove you wrong? I don't think so. That's not how logic works. You make the claim, you back it up.

Edit: If what you're saying is universally true and accepted like you want to pretend why are companies selling fans optimized for case fan duty with lower static pressures instead of only selling their heatsink and radiator models with higher static pressure since those are so much better as case fans?
Man, doyll gave you a very good answer in post #42 he doesn't need any better explanation to his claims which are totally true, and that without mention that most people tend to use dust filters, if you go to the site of the best case filters, Demciflex they recommend for every single filter the usage of High static pressure fans even in their less restrictive filters, doyll explained with a very good why higher static pressure fan works better in any type of case grills there's no reason to provide another proof beyond the physics and how things really works as most people are really confused or fell under marketing specs..

Depending on the case and case fan location, the usage of fans can vary a lot, some cases have a lot of space between the fan intake and the grill, some cases have little to no space making grills even honeycomb style very restrictive and noisy, most fans marketed as "case fans" are pure marketing gimmick as they are only reviewed and tested in no restrictive open air scenarios, of course they can show a high airflow and low noise but as soon as you put in a case all the magic disappear, some fans even high quality ones marketed as case fan product a horrible "Hummmm" sound when used very close to a case grill, or provide little airflow when used with filtered cases, requiring very high speed to have good cooling.. I can be certainly sure that most of case fans are just that, marketing as when used in real world everything just tend to be different for each user usage.

The usage in coolers is even more complicated and Im not go into it right now, as it have complete dependence on what kind and type of cooler is the user using, high density or low density fins air or water cooling require the usage of specific type of fans.. but overall High static pressure fans works better in each scenario at lower RPMs which as he stated is what most of us look in a good build, high cooling performance at the lower possible noise..

doyll is quite versed in the cooling department, I had some serious conversations which him in the past regarding cooling and still I would trust him more than 90% of the guys in [H] about cooling, he doesn't invent anything, everything is well based with multiple sources and everything what he said in this thread is true, which adding a little of anecdotes is the main reason why I use High static pressure fan in all of my cases which are quite large amount, all with good dust filters, most even with DEMciflex filters..
 

Kwaz

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Thermalright has been around for a long time, like turn of the century.
Yeah since 2001 it looks like. It's interesting to me that the Noctua and Thermalright fans are so similar.
 

MavericK

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Some nice advice in this thread...I've been happy with my Noctuas so far (so quiet!) and the Cougar seems pretty good as well.

Switching it up a bit...I think i want to replace the 120mm fans on my H100i and probably the H75 in my SO's machine as well. Looking at the Corsair ML120s...are they any good for static pressure / noise, or no? They are certainly cheaper than many other options.
 

pek

prairie dog
Joined
Nov 7, 2005
Messages
1,264
In my NZXT Phantom 630I use the Noctua NFA-14 pwm (noctua's case fan), 2 in front blowing in with an a/c bulk air filter, an nfa-14 in the bottom blowing in, with the 630 filter, I have the water cooler for my r9 295x2 sandwiched by 2 120 mm noctuas blowing in, another nfa-14 top back blowing out with kind of a tunnel to my noctua cpu cooler, kind of isolating the cpu, and since noctua doesn't make a 200 mm, yet (hint, hint noctua) I use a pair of the nzxt 200's top of case, blowing out. I run with positive pressure, helping to push the heat of the gpu out the back. The 200's are just idling to suck out any heat that that manages to rise to the top of the case. I have enough air moving the I can't hear it less than 3 feet away just below ear height. I use Argus monitor to control the noctua case fans, the two 200's are controlled by the fan control built into the 630 and the gpu controls the water cooler fans. Ambient is about 27c, my cpu never goes over 55c, the gpu will hit 70c running one of the burn in programs, but in doom, fo4 or civ 5 the gpu never goes above 60c, so cool and silent. I may have gone a little overboard with the fans and case, but I do have a lot of filters on it and the inside of the case is also pretty dust free. I like it anyway. ymmv. And it is a very big case, I had to build a re-enforced shelf off the side of my desk to hold it about a foot off the floor and away from most of the dust. As an old friend of mine said, "if it's worth engineering, it's worth over-engineering".
 
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