Windows 95 is 25 Years Old Today!!!

stinger608

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Yeppers, today, August 24th 2020 marks the 25th anniversary of the release of Windows 95.

Wow, just doesn't seem that long ago. I remember having just purchased an amazing Packard Bell system that had a Pentium chip running 8 megs of ram......8 megs not 8 gigs. LOL

Was rocking some of the new games out and could run Quake 2 without any issues :ROFLMAO:

Happen to catch an article on The Verge that reminded me of this big milestone.

Here's a video of the Microsoft Windows 95 launch.


This was the start of the Windows Start Menu and look how far it has came since the launch of Windows 95, 25 years ago today!!!!!

Couldn't have been a better song for the launch in the day. :p
 

Zarathustra[H]

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1598317489548.png
 

Axman

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Musk should install it on a Tesla since it's old enough to rent a car.
 

DogsofJune

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Good luck. I watched a video of a guy trying to install it on new hardware .. like maybe a few years old. No bueno. Had to jump through hoops and in the end it never worked.
Meh, Win 10 works fine, just a pre-emotive erm ma gawd, win 10 is the devil post
 

5150Joker

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Win 95 was great for it's time. Windows 10 is also great (minus the telemetry) and one of the most convenient OS's to date.
 

mashie

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I remember doing a Win95 install using floppy disks once, it was painful shuffling 100+ disks.

On my own computers I never used Win95, I did NT and then jumped straight to Win98.
 

Nside

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I remember doing a Win95 install using floppy disks once, it was painful shuffling 100+ disks.

On my own computers I never used Win95, I did NT and then jumped straight to Win98.
It was 15, but it felt like 100.
I bought the floppy version even though I had a CDrom. Thinking I could reinstall it easier even if my CDrom took a crap. I didn't think to look at the box to see how many disks it was.
0fx9cmqy5pp01.jpg

But if you were installing Office as well... that was another 22 disks...
s-l1600.jpg
*not my images
 

THRESHIN

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It was 15, but it felt like 100.
I bought the floppy version even though I had a CDrom. Thinking I could reinstall it easier even if my CDrom took a crap. I didn't think to look at the box to see how many disks it was.
View attachment 272944

But if you were installing Office as well... that was another 22 disks...
View attachment 272945
*not my images

Oh god thanks for bringing back that memory. We had the floppy version of 95 and it was a painful all day job to install it.

I remember my dad reinstalling the floppy version. He stuck me with babysitting the installation to swap the disks so he could go do something useful with his time. Thanks dad. My dad was an ass.
 

T4rd

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I was 10 or 11 when we got our first NEC PC with Win95 on it. It came pre-loaded with some tutorial software based on a live-captured Wizard with some stereotypical wizard name (probably Merlin) that would pop out from your desktop as if it was a curtain and then walk around the UI to show you how to do certain tasks. I thought it was pretty cool at the time and that wizard pretty much taught my whole family how to use the PC pretty effectively.

That PC came with some answering machine software that worked great and much better than any dedicated answering machine at the time since you could easily navigate, save, and playback messages from any point in time.

I mostly used the computer to play Tomb Raider 2 though and go to a site called Nude raider to see Lara Croft naked, then eventually got the idea to print those off and sell porn at school until I got caught mid-transaction by Ms. Hammond, my social studies teacher. Good times..
 

Format _C:

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Win 95 was great for it's time. Windows 10 is also great (minus the telemetry) and one of the most convenient OS's to date.
Yes even when Windows 7 was still supported I always hated to reinstalls way too many updates and the Windows 7 updates took hours upon hours just for me to come back to have that process fail and have to do that over

10 easy to install and updates are pretty quick

It was 15, but it felt like 100.
I bought the floppy version even though I had a CDrom. Thinking I could reinstall it easier even if my CDrom took a crap. I didn't think to look at the box to see how many disks it was.
View attachment 272944

But if you were installing Office as well... that was another 22 disks...
View attachment 272945
*not my images

Wow one bad disk and you are FU*KED That never did happen to me though I always got the CD-Rom versions (through the local friendly geek in my school for $10) I remember when CD Writers came to market I was the first kid that was 'in' with the others to get one of them. I made so much $ in high school making audio cds and boot-leg software those were the 'good' times man I am old now
 
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Oh god thanks for bringing back that memory. We had the floppy version of 95 and it was a painful all day job to install it.

I remember my dad reinstalling the floppy version. He stuck me with babysitting the installation to swap the disks so he could go do something useful with his time. Thanks dad. My dad was an ass.

Builds character and appreciation :ROFLMAO:
 

HeadRusch

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So was Windows 3.1 a big deal as well?

Windows 3.1 was a big deal if you did work, if you were a kid you didn't care......Windows 3.1 was for people who used WordPerfect, and Lotus-1-2-3.... you could copy your Excel to your Word document and all in the same environment, copy-and-paste and drag with a mouse...that was the real "Windows 3.1!" achievement, before that most of us were more comfortable with command lines. Games still launched from DOS and didn't support windows until they required "Direct X'......Windows 3.14 (network integration) changed most workplaces over from Dumb Terminal/Mainframes to networked desktop PC's....and then slowly but surely you wanted your home computer to use the same disks (literally) that you used at work........over time didn't happen overnight but that's how we got to where we are today. I did a co-op in college in the mid 90's where I spent most of my time teaching middle-aged people how to use these new-fangled "desktop PC's with Windows" as opposed to the amber-screened mainframe terminals they had used since the mid 80's....
 
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HockeyJon

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Man, 25 years. I still remember making the switch from Windows 3.1 and DOS over the Windows 95. I absolutely hated it initially, probably due to my familiarity with DOS and with 3.1, as well as compatibility issues with some of the games I was playing at the time. I eventually came around though, especially as all software began to migrate.

I will say, I do have fond memories of a time when your own computer and operating system wasn’t spying on everything you did and sending it back to the mothership. I still remember when US Congress was going to break Microsoft up over antitrust related to Netscape Navigator of all things, and now they’re literally mining your data with Windows 10, which is unavoidable for most users since the vast majority of software is designed to run on it, and it’s all good! That concept never crossed anyone’s mind in the Windows 95 days.
 

HockeyJon

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Windows 3.1 was a big deal if you did work, if you were a kid you didn't care......Windows 3.1 was for people who used WordPerfect, Microsoft Word was for Windows and you could copy and paste to Excel, so you had this huge pull from WordPerfect and....err....the spreadsheet app I forget now.....remember Microsoft didn't own the Productivity App suite, I think IBM did. Games still launched from DOS and didn't support windows until they required "Direct X'......Windows 3.14 (network integration) changed most workplaces over from Dumb Terminal/Mainframes to networked desktop PC's.......over time didn't happen overnight but that's how we got to where we are today. I did a co-op in college in the early 90's where I spent most of my team teaching people who were my age today how to use these new-fangled "desktop PC's with Windows" as opposed to the amber-screened mainframe terminals they had used since the mid 80's....

Are you thinking of Lotus 1-2-3 or Quattro?
 

HockeyJon

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It was 15, but it felt like 100.
I bought the floppy version even though I had a CDrom. Thinking I could reinstall it easier even if my CDrom took a crap. I didn't think to look at the box to see how many disks it was.
View attachment 272944

But if you were installing Office as well... that was another 22 disks...
View attachment 272945
*not my images

While we’re on the topic of inhuman amounts of floppy disks, does anyone else remember iOmega ZIP disks? I still have my old internal drive. 100MB on a single floppy disk, homie! Too bad CD burners became cool shortly after, making the ZIP drive a bad investment in retrospect.
 

mashie

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Messages
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It was 15, but it felt like 100.
I bought the floppy version even though I had a CDrom. Thinking I could reinstall it easier even if my CDrom took a crap. I didn't think to look at the box to see how many disks it was.
View attachment 272944

But if you were installing Office as well... that was another 22 disks...
View attachment 272945
*not my images
Thinking about it, it was probably a Swedish version of Windows 98SE I found on floppies when I was doing a summer job at an IT company clearing out one of their cupboards. Shame I didn't keep it, it seems to have become quite a collectable now.
 

mashie

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So was Windows 3.1 a big deal as well?
3.1 was a nice upgrade from 3.0 as the interface got the 3D look applied to all the buttons and window frames. 3.11 was an even bigger upgrade as that was when you really could start doing LAN connectivity out of the box.
 

DejaWiz

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I remember using it for the very first time: College AC/DC circuitry class back in late 1995.

Absolutely ground-breaking, especially for the era.

I had a co-worker and friend that installed a massive 128MB of RAM in his P-II 300 computer running a fresh install of Win95C (OSR 2.5) and it wow'ed all of us, since we were still in the 16-48MB range back then.
 
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