What air cooler to get for 3950x? I don't want water cooling.

RavinDJ

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What cooler would you recommend for the 3950x? I don't want water cooling... I'm not going to do crazy rendering or anything that will keep CPU usage at 100% for long periods of time. So, looking for something good but reasonable.
 

Linden

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I just built a Ryzen 3900X - X570 system with one of these. I am very pleased. I don't think you could hear it unless it were outside of the computer case.
 

Azrak

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I don't recommend air cooling for the 3950X. AMD doesn't either.
Why? Have your tests shown it to not keep the CPU cool enough? Mega6's video above shows it being adequate to me.
 

Dan_D

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Why? Have your tests shown it to not keep the CPU cool enough? Mega6's video above shows it being adequate to me.
I haven't run Gooseberry on the newer versions of Blender. I'm running 2.79b on Windows. 2.80 I think it is was considerably faster when I tested it. That's also on Linux, so I'm not sure they are directly comparable. However, I have run it before and the time in that video seems slow to me. I'd have to run the newer test to confirm. I'm seeing temperatures of around 80-85 degrees on full custom water cooling in Blender on a simple 4.3GHz overclock. On air, your going to see either higher temps or throttling of clock speeds to keep the temperatures lower. The way boost clocks work, the warmer your CPU is, the worse it performs. It may be adequate to air cool it with good air coolers but that's hardly ideal. Your leaving performance on the table by sticking with air cooling. When you've spent a decent amount on a motherboard and $750 on a processor, that doesn't make sense to me.

And then there is this:

upload_2020-1-3_10-50-20.png


AMD doesn't include an air cooler because they realize that the cooler packaged with the 3900X wasn't up to the task. So, why does AMD state this? Well, companies like AMD and Intel are usually conservative with their recommendations. Meaning, top tier air cooling is probably fine (though I'd still argue it isn't ideal). However, they can't count on the general public choosing good air cooling. The statement is made probably because air flow, ambient temperatures and other factors in average builds may be problematic for achieving boost clock targets. Recommending something that's better on the cooling front ensures that users get the advertised performance and results that are in line with reviews and user data on forums and so on.

Boost clocking is determined by a number of factors. CPU temperature being one of the key factors that determines how often boost clocks can be achieved. Dissipating 250w of heat is not an easy task for an air cooler. There is "getting by" and doing it well.
 

Mega6

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In the video I posted, keeping an eye on the clocks - they will dip into the 3900MHz range. We have no idea on ambient temps (that I saw). It would appear that even excellent air cooling leaves a lot on the table. If you are just doing gaming and light workloads, the 3950x probably isn't for you. I would suggest a 3900x on air with the NH-D15.

If you can bite the bullet and go aio - there are some great options out there for the 3950x. Kraken x72, Thermaltake Floe DX 360mm, corsair H150i Pro Hydro. I think the H150i is the quietest of the bunch.
 
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GSDragoon

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Air coolers really need to catch up with these new CPUs. Most were designed for quad cores, max.
I blame Intel and AIO RGB crap.
 
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Mega6

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Air coolers really need to catch up with these new CPUs. Most were designed for quad cores, max.
I blame Intel and AIO RGB crap.
Air will never catch up to water, it's physics. Air coolers need a lot of surface area to dissipate heat. They are simply becoming too large to handle the watts required for multicore chips and chiplets. Water with a radiator and fans is just so much more efficient than air.
 
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Dan_D

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In the video I posted, keeping an eye on the clocks - they will dip into the 3900MHz range. We have no idea on ambient temps (that I saw). It would appear that even excellent air cooling leaves a lot on the table. If you are just doing gaming and light workloads, the 3950x probably isn't for you. I would suggest a 3900x on air with the NH-D15.

If you can bite the bullet and go aio - there are some great options out there for the 3950x. Kraken x72, Thermaltake Floe DX 360mm, corsair H150i Pro Hydro. I think the H150i is the quietest of the bunch.
I get 4.1GHz all core running Blender with the Gooseberry test file. So, water cooling is giving me at least a 200MHz advantage. Mind you, the block isn't ideal (it's an older block) and the radiator is just a 360mm. I got about 4.15GHz on the 3900X under the same configuration. I think it's clear you leave performance on the table by reducing clocks. Clocks are important. It doesn't seem like much, but it does matter. Going up to 4.3GHz all core yields pretty decent gains. Just as single core boosting to 4.6GHz+ impacts games and other applications.
 

kamikazi

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My 3900x hovers around 4 GHZ in CB20 multi with a Corsair H100i SE Platinum (240 mm AIO) in push pull with Corsair LL120s pushing and Noctua A12x25s pulling with the pump set to extreme and fans ramped pretty aggressively. I can't see any air cooling keeping up with that and I'm not getting the greatest clocks as is. I wouldn't go air at all.
 

somebrains

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My 3900x hovers around 4 GHZ in CB20 multi with a Corsair H100i SE Platinum (240 mm AIO) in push pull with Corsair LL120s pushing and Noctua A12x25s pulling with the pump set to extreme and fans ramped pretty aggressively. I can't see any air cooling keeping up with that and I'm not getting the greatest clocks as is. I wouldn't go air at all.
People will run systems that are delivering less performance for their own reasons.
I'm starting to think of them like vegans or low carb beer drinkers.

There were ample 2700x owners that benchmarked their builds with stock cooling, and aftermarket, noting throttling with the stock cooler.
Doubling cores you'd think would push people to open loops, with an aio as a start point for data.

It's like having 750hp on the side of your car, but it's only driven around town in traffic.
 

RavinDJ

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Thanks for all the input guys! I know AMD recommends water cooling but it's not a "requirement." Like you said, it's better to have water cooling and the CPU is probably overkill if I don't maximize the usage, but it's a much-needed upgrade ad water cooling is just not an option.
 

tangoseal

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I don't recommend air cooling for the 3950X. AMD doesn't either.
Even AIO is an Air cooler though Dan.

I'd just say use a Noctua and never look back. It will do the job. Hes not gonna thermal throttle. Might not get the highest of highs on boost clocks but it will be stable and run well.
 

kirbyrj

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Even AIO is an Air cooler though Dan.

I'd just say use a Noctua and never look back. It will do the job. Hes not gonna thermal throttle. Might not get the highest of highs on boost clocks but it will be stable and run well.
Yes, but that's not what AMD means by air cooler even if you are technically correct.
 

Dan_D

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Even AIO is an Air cooler though Dan.

I'd just say use a Noctua and never look back. It will do the job. Hes not gonna thermal throttle. Might not get the highest of highs on boost clocks but it will be stable and run well.
I never said anything in this thread about an AIO.
 

RavinDJ

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Now you guys got me thinking... say I did go with water-cooling, it would be my first water cooled CPU. What case would I get (I know this isn't the case forum) that can hold the radiator? Also, it may sound dumb, but... do I just put water in the radiator? I'm assuming decent instructions come with a water cooler on what type of liquid and how much of the liquid to put inside.
 

theonedub

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There are literally a metric ton of guides to view online for first time water coolers. Read through a couple then see what your comfort level looks like.
 

Mega6

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Now you guys got me thinking... say I did go with water-cooling, it would be my first water cooled CPU. What case would I get (I know this isn't the case forum) that can hold the radiator? Also, it may sound dumb, but... do I just put water in the radiator? I'm assuming decent instructions come with a water cooler on what type of liquid and how much of the liquid to put inside.
AIO is easy,plug and play - just make sure you have a case setup for it. No filling, just put it in.
 

somebrains

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Now you guys got me thinking... say I did go with water-cooling, it would be my first water cooled CPU. What case would I get (I know this isn't the case forum) that can hold the radiator? Also, it may sound dumb, but... do I just put water in the radiator? I'm assuming decent instructions come with a water cooler on what type of liquid and how much of the liquid to put inside.
You bought the highest sku AMD consumer part.
Treat it like a BMW M3/M5/etc where it'll require diff fluids and service than normal BMWs.

Find out what size rad the case will support.
Hit you local stocking retailer that has a return policy like bestbuy and try it.

I like to run pump at 100%, fans on a curve set by me off Mobo fan headers.
Avoid aio cooler software issues.

Decide if you need more cooling from there and adjust accordingly.

If you come back here and state that open loop is required for your changed set of requirements based on real world 14 days of aio use we can help you with a further plan of attack.
 

tangoseal

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Yes, but that's not what AMD means by air cooler even if you are technically correct.
Yeah I know what you mean. I just wished AIO was called hybrid coolers or something. The term water cooling and AIO has really misled people in the true technical differences and the dollar amount!
I never said anything in this thread about an AIO.
You sort of did when you mentioned " I dont recommend air cooling for the 3950x. AMD doesnt either." So I mentioned that AIO is also an air cooler in comparison to a true loop.

Reading between the lines you couldnt have possibly been recommending that he go out and spend $700 in parts on a custom loop when he said he not interested in water cooling. So that means by logic you were possibly thinking AIO. But I cant put words in your mouth. It was just an assumption based on a logical interpretation. Sometimes that's all we have to go on in somewhat ambiguous replies. For all I know maybe you were suggesting a full custom loop.
 
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Dan_D

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If you do go AIO, make it a 360 and a good one. If you go custom, we can certainly help. I've done several of them lately. It isn't cheap, but once you've got it, you'll be set for years. At worst, you drain your loop and change the waterblock for a different CPU. Or change the blocks mounting hardware.

I'd go with soft tubing for your first build. Stick with parts from Bitspower, EKWB, Heatkiller, and Corsair.

A good case for first timers is the Lian-Li PC-O11 Dynamic.
 

Dan_D

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Yeah I know what you mean. I just wished AIO was called hybrid coolers or something. The term water cooling and AIO has really misled people in the true technical differences and the dollar amount!


You sort of did when you mentioned " I dont recommend air cooling for the 3950x. AMD doesnt either."

Reading between the lines you couldnt have possibly been recommending that he go out and spend $700 in parts on a custom loop when he said he not interested in water cooling. So that means by logic you were possibly thinking AIO. But I cant put words in your mouth. It was just an assumption based on a logical interpretation. Sometimes that's all we have to go on in somewhat ambiguous replies.
In truth, I meant either a really good 360 AIO or a custom water cooling solution. I recommend the latter, but understand budget constraints on that.
 

tangoseal

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In truth, I meant either a really good 360 AIO or a custom water cooling solution. I recommend the latter, but understand budget constraints on that.
Yeah I would agree with that. A big ass AIO that is well made should be as good as a mid range custom loop or a high end loop with less good airflow.

I guess I was trying to suggest that a cheap $70 microcenter special AIO is NOT gonna even come close to a water cooler.
 

Dan_D

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My Thermaltake Floe Riing 360 Premium Edition AIO is a beast. It's not as good as a custom loop, but it does work very well. It can pretty easily handle a 9900K @ 5.0GHz, a Threadripper 2950X @ 4.2GHz all core and so on. It couldn't really handle a Threadripper 2990WX though. Temps are better on my custom loop, which obviously has greater heat dissipation capacity but it gets the job done for a variety of high end CPU's.
 

Furious_Styles

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Now you guys got me thinking... say I did go with water-cooling, it would be my first water cooled CPU. What case would I get (I know this isn't the case forum) that can hold the radiator? Also, it may sound dumb, but... do I just put water in the radiator? I'm assuming decent instructions come with a water cooler on what type of liquid and how much of the liquid to put inside.
Just go D15 man, no new case and sounds like it's perfect for your use-case.
 

kamikazi

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My Thermaltake Floe Riing 360 Premium Edition AIO is a beast. It's not as good as a custom loop, but it does work very well. It can pretty easily handle a 9900K @ 5.0GHz, a Threadripper 2950X @ 4.2GHz all core and so on. It couldn't really handle a Threadripper 2990WX though. Temps are better on my custom loop, which obviously has greater heat dissipation capacity but it gets the job done for a variety of high end CPU's.
I'm thinking of upgrading my H100i SE Platinum for a 360 mm AIO for my incoming 3950x. In your personal opinion, what is the best? Your TT Floe Premium (is that the DX version?), Corsair H150 pro, NZXT Kraken X72? In some reviews, my H100i achieves just as good cooling as a 360, but it's louder of course.
 

Sodapopjones

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Are you kidding me? Noctua d15 is about as Enthusiast as you can get on an air cooler.

Not enthusiast
View attachment 213073

Pretty freaking enthusiast
View attachment 213074

When has a true water loop defined the term enthusiast and only enthusiast?

Even Dan's AIO is enthusiast

Lmao
I would rather have a good air cooler, than a middle of the road AIO for the same price... No risk of leaks/failure just blow the dust out of the giant row of fins, plus they're usually within a few degrees of one another.

If you're going to play with water, just go with a custom loop and fork out the extra money imo.
 

n370zed

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I would rather have a good air cooler, than a middle of the road AIO for the same price... No risk of leaks/failure just blow the dust out of the giant row of fins, plus they're usually within a few degrees of one another.

If you're going to play with water, just go with a custom loop and fork out the extra money imo.
My Corsair H100i RGB Platinum ran me $120 on sale. I couldve gotten a D15 for $90. Whats the average cost to go full "run of the mill" water setup? Just curious. And with no experience too..whats it cost to pay someone to do it?
 

Dan_D

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Well.....

EKWB CPU waterblock - $110
EkWB 480mm radiator - $100
Corsair 420mm radiator - $80
EKWB RGB res - $80
EKWB Quantum Aorus GPU block w/backplate - $236
Thermaltake Riing Plus 120mm fans (x4) - $130
Thermaltake Riing Plus 140mm fans (x5) - $150
Miscellaneous fittings - $130
PETG tubing - $40-60 (I messed this up here and there.)

It can be done for less of course. But it can get expensive. It will nickel and dime you if not carefully planned.
 

primetime

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i would just get that case and aio dan suggested....super easy and done
 
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