Switch From Windows to Linux

Lakados

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Maybe for the average user that is just going to turn on their PC and open Chrome, sure. But then wouldn't they just buy a Chromebook? My problem for decades now with Linux is kind of the contrary to how most Distros and Open Source software works, it's so fragmented that nothing seems "done". Yeah, I can find an app that does what I want but it's half ass complete because the developers parted ways / differing opinions / can't agree on color of the sky, so each of them fork the product into different directions that gets forked by some a-hole that wants the background to be orange and now we have 5 applications that are all the same only slightly different and none are finished. The Open Source movement was supposed to bring collaboration together and foster creative thinking. Instead it's just turned into a fragmented mess of opinions. Even a distro can't get it's shit together. The basis of the operating system. "Well I don't like that it doesn't run KDE, so fuck you guys I'm making another distro using the same core but with KDE and the shit I want on it". Good for you.

Just make something feel complete, for the love of all things holy.
Yeah the open source movement is it’s own biggest enemy.
 

ManofGod

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TwiceOver said:
Maybe for the average user that is just going to turn on their PC and open Chrome, sure. But then wouldn't they just buy a Chromebook? My problem for decades now with Linux is kind of the contrary to how most Distros and Open Source software works, it's so fragmented that nothing seems "done". Yeah, I can find an app that does what I want but it's half ass complete because the developers parted ways / differing opinions / can't agree on color of the sky, so each of them fork the product into different directions that gets forked by some a-hole that wants the background to be orange and now we have 5 applications that are all the same only slightly different and none are finished. The Open Source movement was supposed to bring collaboration together and foster creative thinking. Instead it's just turned into a fragmented mess of opinions. Even a distro can't get it's shit together. The basis of the operating system. "Well I don't like that it doesn't run KDE, so fuck you guys I'm making another distro using the same core but with KDE and the shit I want on it". Good for you.

Just make something feel complete, for the love of all things holy.

Yeah the open source movement is it’s own biggest enemy.
Yeah, there are exceptions, such as Level1techs and Christitus but, they are very specific in what they are doing and enjoying it.
 

KarsusTG

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Very few have overall, in the big scheme of things. In fact, I would hazard a guess to say it is in the single digit percentages overall. I have yet to see FOSS operating systems in any major industry I have worked in.
You need to get out more man. The simple truth is the more servers a company has the more likely those servers are going to be Linux. I would say windows servers are very close to single digit, and that makes sense if you think about it. You primarily find windows servers for small to medium sized companies. I have worked for most of the large US airlines and they all ran primarily Linux or UNIX. Heck, I think last I looked, Microsoft only has around 4ish % of the webservers globally and honestly, I feel that is being generous. Last I read, Microsoft servers have less than 10% of the cloud market. I know most of the US government and military back end is now running red hat stuff. I know for a fact Sony is running Linux servers for their playstation infrastructure.

Not to beat on Microsoft too much because when you have hundreds to thousands of desktop users, AD is a beautiful thing. It's just a sea of Linux if you go any deeper.
 

Mazzspeed

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Yeah the open source movement is it’s own biggest enemy.
Having someone tag in and fork a project when the original developer is too exhausted to carry on or financial concerns become too much of a challenge, as opposed to proprietary solutions simply vanishing overnight with no hope of forking is somehow a bad thing?
 

4saken

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Having someone tag in and fork a project when the original developer is too exhausted to carry on or financial concerns become too much of a challenge, as opposed to proprietary solutions simply vanishing overnight with no hope of forking is somehow a bad thing?
Not at all. But the SJW crowd has infiltrated, infighting on large OSS projects, disagreements on direction has pretty much caused a lot of decisions to go crazy.
 

Lakados

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Having someone tag in and fork a project when the original developer is too exhausted to carry on or financial concerns become too much of a challenge, as opposed to proprietary solutions simply vanishing overnight with no hope of forking is somehow a bad thing?
That is the one and only time forking is a good thing. 99% of the time the people working on it have a minor disagreement on something mundane and go their separate ways and split their resources 3 different ways making the same projects with extremely minor flavour differences. For them to ultimately burn out for somebody else to come along and repeat the process.
 

Mazzspeed

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That is the one and only time forking is a good thing. 99% of the time the people working on it have a minor disagreement on something mundane and go their separate ways and split their resources 3 different ways making the same projects with extremely minor flavour differences. For them to ultimately burn out for somebody else to come along and repeat the process.
And these differences are worse than no software at all in the case of proprietary software?

I use Clementine Music player, it's been forked to Strawberry music player because 'FLAC purests', but I find Clementine better and FLAC still sounds awesome. I overcame the issue by continuing to use Clementine.
 

Dajinn

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You need to get out more man. The simple truth is the more servers a company has the more likely those servers are going to be Linux. I would say windows servers are very close to single digit, and that makes sense if you think about it. You primarily find windows servers for small to medium sized companies. I have worked for most of the large US airlines and they all ran primarily Linux or UNIX. Heck, I think last I looked, Microsoft only has around 4ish % of the webservers globally and honestly, I feel that is being generous. Last I read, Microsoft servers have less than 10% of the cloud market. I know most of the US government and military back end is now running red hat stuff. I know for a fact Sony is running Linux servers for their playstation infrastructure.

Not to beat on Microsoft too much because when you have hundreds to thousands of desktop users, AD is a beautiful thing. It's just a sea of Linux if you go any deeper.
What do the back ends look like, are they highly scaled out VMware implementations which then have hundreds or more of RHEL et al VMs running?
 

ChadD

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What do the back ends look like, are they highly scaled out VMware implementations which then have hundreds or more of RHEL et al VMs running?
Cloud servers lean heavy toward Linux and one big advantage of the cloud in general is being able to scale things up or down. I was talking with a cousin of mine who was in for the holidays, he is a AI egg head who is paid very well developing AI. Side note its funny how the public sector is employing the AI wiz kids like they are in academia.. he comes and goes as he pleases and tells me he will sometimes spend a week working on things he knows are crazy. I guess there is plenty of investment bucks around to throw at the long shot AI stuff. To the point... the company he works for they always have a few Linux cloud servers going, when they have a heavy training load to work on they just spin up as many as they need. Its orders of magnitude cheaper then having local stuff, hiring the support staff for that, and then always having more server hardware then needed or worse not enough. Right now when they come up to where they now they need to train 100 thousand pictures of sneakers they just spin up as many servers as required to burn through them.

Perhaps that type of stuff does bump the Linux numbers a bit as that type of custom work where a company may need 100 servers for a few weeks tend to favor Linux environments. Custom stuff is always going to favor Linux.
 

Nebell

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For most people there's absolutely no point in switching to Linux. I tried one of the easiest, most popular Linux a couple of years ago. Complete trash compared to Windows, and I love trying new stuff.
 

SmokeRngs

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For most people there's absolutely no point in switching to Linux. I tried one of the easiest, most popular Linux a couple of years ago. Complete trash compared to Windows, and I love trying new stuff.
So what happens when Microsoft drops out of the OS business? Are you going to hold on desperately to the deprecated Win10 install forever? Give up computing?

The vast majority of complaints boil down to two things. The first is the fact that any OS isn't Windows and people expect it to be. With that type of mindset people are going into something expecting it to fail and will find ways to fail. But at the same time even with a massive UI change people will gripe about different versions of Windows and learn where all the stuff moved to and say it's perfect.

The other reason is a lack of known software. What do you think will happen when Microsoft goes to abandon the OS market? All of a sudden you're going to see the very same software you can basically only find on Windows on Linux instead.
 

Pantalaimon

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So what happens when Microsoft drops out of the OS business? Are you going to hold on desperately to the deprecated Win10 install forever? Give up computing?

The vast majority of complaints boil down to two things. The first is the fact that any OS isn't Windows and people expect it to be. With that type of mindset people are going into something expecting it to fail and will find ways to fail. But at the same time even with a massive UI change people will gripe about different versions of Windows and learn where all the stuff moved to and say it's perfect.

The other reason is a lack of known software. What do you think will happen when Microsoft goes to abandon the OS market? All of a sudden you're going to see the very same software you can basically only find on Windows on Linux instead.
It's not just the normal home users, but also business users, and at this point I don't think the switch will ever happen there unless Microsoft makes a Linux version of MS Office, which is 100% compatible with the Windows versions. I know some people will mention the free alternatives on Linux, but none of hem are 100% compatible as far as I know.
 

Dajinn

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Cloud servers lean heavy toward Linux and one big advantage of the cloud in general is being able to scale things up or down. I was talking with a cousin of mine who was in for the holidays, he is a AI egg head who is paid very well developing AI. Side note its funny how the public sector is employing the AI wiz kids like they are in academia.. he comes and goes as he pleases and tells me he will sometimes spend a week working on things he knows are crazy. I guess there is plenty of investment bucks around to throw at the long shot AI stuff. To the point... the company he works for they always have a few Linux cloud servers going, when they have a heavy training load to work on they just spin up as many as they need. Its orders of magnitude cheaper then having local stuff, hiring the support staff for that, and then always having more server hardware then needed or worse not enough. Right now when they come up to where they now they need to train 100 thousand pictures of sneakers they just spin up as many servers as required to burn through them.

Perhaps that type of stuff does bump the Linux numbers a bit as that type of custom work where a company may need 100 servers for a few weeks tend to favor Linux environments. Custom stuff is always going to favor Linux.
To me that sounds like something highly distributed such as openstack I guess? In MS world seems like it would be Azure.
 

Mazzspeed

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For most people there's absolutely no point in switching to Linux. I tried one of the easiest, most popular Linux a couple of years ago. Complete trash compared to Windows, and I love trying new stuff.
Subjective opinions are always the best.

Lol. :ROFLMAO:
 

Mazzspeed

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It's not just the normal home users, but also business users, and at this point I don't think the switch will ever happen there unless Microsoft makes a Linux version of MS Office, which is 100% compatible with the Windows versions. I know some people will mention the free alternatives on Linux, but none of hem are 100% compatible as far as I know.
Actually, MS Office is the worlds least compatible with ISO standards office suite marketed as the most compatible. When you can open a docx file just fine between Libre Office and WPS Office but have issues under MS Office - That's an issue with MS Office.

I've got a few clients that work in legal that still use Wordperfect.

I deal with many companies switching to alternate solutions such as Gsuite, they love it and the freedom it presents. Furthermore, their businesses seem to be running just fine. If you can't adapt from MS Office and learn new things, in the business world that's called baggage and it's time for you to move on - People don't like paying out the proverbial to accommodate people that aren't willing to adapt.

Having said that, I use Libre Office 100% for the running of my business and have yet to encounter a compatibility issue. People that encounter compatibility issues under Excel, are usually using Excel for purposes it was never intended or should be switching to cloud based accounting solutions in the case of number crunching.
 
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Jagger100

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I like how many people formed an opinion of Linux from 15 years ago and think it hasn't changed.

There's a threshold of adequacy that any developing OS will hit eventually. If it's not there, it will be in the next 5 years for Linux. Gaming of course is monopolized between Microsoft DirectX and videocards. But if Grandma just needs e-mail and a browser, Linux is perfectly acceptable.

The only development to Windows in the past 20 years that mattered to me, as a user, is 1) USB 3 support 2) True 64-bit. Anything else is for the corporate or administrative utility. WIndows was good enough for me as a program launcher with Windows 95. The network was adequate for home by Win98/ME. The rest has been updates for hardware advances.

Right now I'd say Linux is comparably at the Win95 level.
 

Pantalaimon

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Actually, MS Office is the worlds least compatible with ISO standards office suite marketed as the most compatible. When you can open a docx file just fine between Libre Office and WPS Office but have issues under MS Office - That's an issue with MS Office.

I've got a few clients that work in legal that still use Wordperfect.

I deal with many companies switching to alternate solutions such as Gsuite, they love it and the freedom it presents. Furthermore, their businesses seem to be running just fine. If you can't adapt from MS Office and learn new things, in the business world that's called baggage and it's time for you to move on - People don't like paying out the proverbial to accommodate people that aren't willing to adapt.

Having said that, I use Libre Office 100% for the running of my business and have yet to encounter a compatibility issue. People that encounter compatibility issues under Excel, are usually using Excel for purposes it was never intended or should be switching to cloud based accounting solutions in the case of number crunching.
It's not about whether MS Office is compatible with ISO standards or not. It's about whether an MS Office document is compatible with other office suites. It's also not about learning new things, but the certainty that you can collaborate with others out side your organization on the same document(s) without fear of formatting and other compatibility issues.
 
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Decisions in the Linux kernel are made based on performance and efficiency; although granted, this is slowly changing with the influx of non-technical "woke developers" - re: Linus and RMS "cancel"-attempts.

Decisions in the Windows kernel seem to be mostly based on eroding user freedoms in the name of "business" and money-grubbing. Performance and efficiency are an afterthought (if a thought at all).

Servers, supercomputers, and mainframes tend to run Linux or some Unix-flavor:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Usage_share_of_operating_systems#Market_share_by_category
 

ChadD

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To me that sounds like something highly distributed such as openstack I guess? In MS world seems like it would be Azure.
Well they use Amazon, but ya they could use any cloud provider giving them a good deal I imagine. Azure as per MS is now majority Linux installs as well.
 

ManofGod

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Decisions in the Windows kernel seem to be mostly based on eroding user freedoms in the name of "business" and money-grubbing. Performance and efficiency are an afterthought (if a thought at all).
That makes no sense at all, since we are speaking about the kernel itself here. The fact that you cannot compile or modify the Windows kernel at all has always been the case. It is a kernel, not the desktop interface.
 

cybereality

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I've been dual booting for 2 years, and switched to Ubuntu full-time 3 months ago.

It's actually been really nice. Granted lots of Windows software is not available (e.g. Photoshop) but the FOSS alternatives are capable.

I find that Linux does require more setup and configuration compared to Win 10, but I like messing with computers and it's fun when you get something to work.

Love all the customization you can do, you can really make the look and feel your own, and the amount of themes and extensions dwarfs Window by a huge amount.

With Steam Play (Proton) and Lutris, there are a good deal of Windows games that are playable out-of-box, or with a few simple config changes. Things on the Linux gaming front have improved 10x in the last year.

People seem to like to complain about Microsoft and Windows 10 Spyware Edition, but don't give Linux the chance it deserves. Really, just try it out seriously and see it's not too bad at all.

I would recommend Kubuntu, since the look and effects are really nice out-of-box. Manjaro KDE is also a good choice (I've been using Ubuntu for a bit now, so I'm sticking with it since I've gotten comfortable, but decide for yourself).

It seems more likely to me that Microsoft will embrace Linux, they are already doing a good amount with WSL, Azure, VS Code, and open-source license for certain things they are working on. Windows 11 will be a Linux distro.
 
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Mazzspeed

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It's not about whether MS Office is compatible with ISO standards or not. It's about whether an MS Office document is compatible with other office suites. It's also not about learning new things, but the certainty that you can collaborate with others out side your organization on the same document(s) without fear of formatting and other compatibility issues.
The problem is Microsoft have delibrately manipulated ISO standards and produced obscure documentation making cross compatibility (a situation ISO standards are intended to overcome) difficult. Having said that, the open source community has done a stellar job with compatibility and I encounter no issues running Libre Office.

The organizations running Gsuite aren't complaining either..
 

Mazzspeed

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I've been dual booting for 2 years, and switched to Ubuntu full-time 3 months ago.

It's actually been really nice. Granted lots of Windows software is not available (e.g. Photoshop) but the FOSS alternatives are capable.

I find the Linux does require more setup and configuration compared to Win 10, but I like messing with computers and it's fun when you get something to work.

Love all the customization you can do, you can really make the look and feel your own, and the amount of themes and extensions dwarfs Window by a huge amount.

With Steam Play (Proton) and Lutris, there are a good deal of Windows games that are playable out-of-box, or with a few simple config changes. Things on the Linux gaming front have improved 10x in the last year.

People seem to like to complain about Microsoft and Windows 10 Spyware Edition, but don't give Linux the chance it deserves. Really, just try it out seriously and see it's not too bad at all.

I would recommend Kubuntu, since the look and effects are really nice out-of-box. Manjaro KDE is also a good choice (I've been using Ubuntu for a bit now, so I'm sticking with it since I've gotten comfortable, but decide for yourself).

It seems more likely to me that Microsoft will embrace Linux, they are already doing a good amount with WSL, Azure, VS Code, and open-source license for certain things they are working on. Windows 11 will be a Linux distro.
I use KDE Neon, totally recommended for transitioning Windows users. Personally I find KDE to be one of the most polished DE's out there with very enthusiastic devs constantly pushing improvements - There's even talk of mixed fractional scaling between monitors under Xorg. Their fractional scaling works amazingly as it is at 4k, mixed scaling would be the icing on the cake.
 

Mazzspeed

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Right now I'd say Linux is comparably at the Win95 level.
Oh c'mon! It's way, way, way past Win95 level! Linux is different to Windows, but it's on par with Windows tech wise if not exceeding Windows considering the aging NT kernel and NTFS file system.

Considering NTFS, Windows is actually the OS that's lagging. ;)
 

PhaseNoise

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I use KDE Neon, totally recommended for transitioning Windows users. Personally I find KDE to be one of the most polished DE's out there with very enthusiastic devs constantly pushing improvements - There's even talk of mixed fractional scaling between monitors under Xorg. Their fractional scaling works amazingly as it is at 4k, mixed scaling would be the icing on the cake.
Been using KDE since pre 1.0, and would agree. Flexible, looks great, and generally can do as little or as much as you want without fuss. It doesn't push as hard to be different as some others, but I view that as a positive. Most people expect a few certain normal operations to work the same, and they do.

Ubuntu and Gnome in particular like play "guess where X is now!" and I ain't got time for that. The entire point of having my linux boxes is to just do work and not fight me.
 

Mazzspeed

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Been using KDE since pre 1.0, and would agree. Flexible, looks great, and generally can do as little or as much as you want without fuss. It doesn't push as hard to be different as some others, but I view that as a positive. Most people expect a few certain normal operations to work the same, and they do.

Ubuntu and Gnome in particular like play "guess where X is now!" and I ain't got time for that. The entire point of having my linux boxes is to just do work and not fight me.
I'm not a fan of Gnome or their devs...
 

Pantalaimon

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The problem is Microsoft have delibrately manipulated ISO standards and produced obscure documentation making cross compatibility (a situation ISO standards are intended to overcome) difficult. Having said that, the open source community has done a stellar job with compatibility and I encounter no issues running Libre Office.

The organizations running Gsuite aren't complaining either..
You surely don't think that every little incident of incompatibility issues gets reported to the communities?

I work for a company implementing print solutions. We usually start with one of the free alternatives to MS Office on the print server to handle the conversion of office documents for when users emails in their office documents for visitor / mobile printing. In my personal experience, about 6 out of 10 cases the client will switch to putting MS Office on the print server after users start complaining about how the printouts don't look ok. Maybe 2 out 10 will restrict visitor / mobile printing to PDF files only eliminating the formatting compatibility issues. The remaining 2 don't have issues. Not exactly a ringing endorsement in this use case from the users' perspective

In none of these incidents will anyone investigate further or report the incompatibility issues in further details. Our technical guys certainly don't, since it's not our responsibility to investigate why LibreOffice / OpenOffice is not compatible with some exotic formatting created on MSOffice. Our Client's IT certainly don't either since it's also not their responsibility. Besides, why waste time and efforts, when the easy fix is to use MSOffice on the print server instead. So, the end result is that all people involved get the impression, that there's still compatibility issues with those free MSOffice alternatives, and it's still safer to use the MSOffice suite.
 

Mazzspeed

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You surely don't think that every little incident of incompatibility issues gets reported to the communities?

I work for a company implementing print solutions. We usually start with one of the free alternatives to MS Office on the print server to handle the conversion of office documents for when users emails in their office documents for visitor / mobile printing. In my personal experience, about 6 out of 10 cases the client will switch to putting MS Office on the print server after users start complaining about how the printouts don't look ok. Maybe 2 out 10 will restrict visitor / mobile printing to PDF files only eliminating the formatting compatibility issues. The remaining 2 don't have issues. Not exactly a ringing endorsement in this use case from the users' perspective

In none of these incidents will anyone investigate further or report the incompatibility issues in further details. Our technical guys certainly don't, since it's not our responsibility to investigate why LibreOffice / OpenOffice is not compatible with some exotic formatting created on MSOffice. Our Client's IT certainly don't either since it's also not their responsibility. Besides, why waste time and efforts, when the easy fix is to use MSOffice on the print server instead. So, the end result is that all people involved get the impression, that there's still compatibility issues with those free MSOffice alternatives, and it's still safer to use the MSOffice suite.
And the same happens under differing versions of MS Office itself. Furthermore, LIbre Office have periods where the community is actively encouraged to report bounties in order to actively improve compatibility. Most don't even know that there's a tool built into Libre Office itself under File > Wizards > Document Convertor to actively convert Microsoft Office documents into a format that better suits Libre Office.

What you're describing sounds more like an issue with incorrect border settings than anything else.

The fact remains that ISO standards are supposed to overcome all compatibility issues, thanks solely to Microsoft - They don't. Furthermore, no one should be sending documents in raw docx or even odf format, PDF all the way.
 
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Algrim

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Holy cow, trying to twist things to say what they are not saying. What is said is that the Linux Kernel will never be the foundation of the Windows Operating System, not know, not ever. That is a highly basic understanding without any contradiction at all. The ability to think with the blinders off.......
I think you’re both overthinking and under thinking this. Programs, for the most part, are designed to work with the Application Program(ming) Interface (API). Your program doesn’t tell the operating system what to do; your program tells the API what to do and the API tells the OS what to do. A well-designed program will work exclusively with the API and not the underlying OS. IF you were working with an awesome platform-agnostic API you could swap the underlying OS with any other OS that supports all of the features of the API. Theoretically, it shouldn’t matter that the underlying kernel is Linux or NT or BSD but that would assume that the API was made compatible with the swapped OS (something that Microsoft certainly has the technical know how and budget to execute upon, if they wanted to).

Now, if the programmer has decided to use OS-specific features it won’t translate exactly to an OS swap. Microsoft, being the conservative company that it is, would probably not consider swapping the underlying kernel without ensuring that almost every program targeting the kernel is either obsolete or dead before attempting to swap the underlying kernel.
 

ChadD

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You surely don't think that every little incident of incompatibility issues gets reported to the communities?

I work for a company implementing print solutions. We usually start with one of the free alternatives to MS Office on the print server to handle the conversion of office documents for when users emails in their office documents for visitor / mobile printing. In my personal experience, about 6 out of 10 cases the client will switch to putting MS Office on the print server after users start complaining about how the printouts don't look ok. Maybe 2 out 10 will restrict visitor / mobile printing to PDF files only eliminating the formatting compatibility issues. The remaining 2 don't have issues. Not exactly a ringing endorsement in this use case from the users' perspective

In none of these incidents will anyone investigate further or report the incompatibility issues in further details. Our technical guys certainly don't, since it's not our responsibility to investigate why LibreOffice / OpenOffice is not compatible with some exotic formatting created on MSOffice. Our Client's IT certainly don't either since it's also not their responsibility. Besides, why waste time and efforts, when the easy fix is to use MSOffice on the print server instead. So, the end result is that all people involved get the impression, that there's still compatibility issues with those free MSOffice alternatives, and it's still safer to use the MSOffice suite.
No doubt MS has been able to keep a lot of companies slaves thanks to their dishonest non conformity in regards to standards.

MS might be getting better... but I notice they still haven't corrected their issues with their #1 lock in MS office.

They helped create the open doc standard... and a year later had their crapware using MSOpendoc which is anything but.

You hit it exactly right .PDF does exactly what it was designed to do. The easy path your right ends up simply being stick with MS. Not the cheapest option nor best but it sure is the easiest no doubt.
 

Mazzspeed

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I think you’re both overthinking and under thinking this. Programs, for the most part, are designed to work with the Application Program(ming) Interface (API). Your program doesn’t tell the operating system what to do; your program tells the API what to do and the API tells the OS what to do. A well-designed program will work exclusively with the API and not the underlying OS. IF you were working with an awesome platform-agnostic API you could swap the underlying OS with any other OS that supports all of the features of the API. Theoretically, it shouldn’t matter that the underlying kernel is Linux or NT or BSD but that would assume that the API was made compatible with the swapped OS (something that Microsoft certainly has the technical know how and budget to execute upon, if they wanted to).

Now, if the programmer has decided to use OS-specific features it won’t translate exactly to an OS swap. Microsoft, being the conservative company that it is, would probably not consider swapping the underlying kernel without ensuring that almost every program targeting the kernel is either obsolete or dead before attempting to swap the underlying kernel.
Which is what I've been stating.
 

Nebell

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So what happens when Microsoft drops out of the OS business? Are you going to hold on desperately to the deprecated Win10 install forever? Give up computing?

The vast majority of complaints boil down to two things. The first is the fact that any OS isn't Windows and people expect it to be. With that type of mindset people are going into something expecting it to fail and will find ways to fail. But at the same time even with a massive UI change people will gripe about different versions of Windows and learn where all the stuff moved to and say it's perfect.

The other reason is a lack of known software. What do you think will happen when Microsoft goes to abandon the OS market? All of a sudden you're going to see the very same software you can basically only find on Windows on Linux instead.
I think I will be long dead when Microsoft abandons OS market.
 

ManofGod

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Maybe, but the signs and evidence point to it happening sooner rather than later.
The "signs" at best are misinterpreted and more wishful thinking than anything else. So what is it going to be, Windows is going to be abandoned and dead, the Windows kernel will be replaced with a Linux kernel, Windows will be a distro instead or Windows will become a subscription?

Edit: Even I do not agree with everything ChrisTitusTech says but, he is sensible in realizing that the Windows kernel will never be replaced by the Linux kernel. Listen to his video on the subject and you will know where I am coming from.
 

Mazzspeed

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The "signs" at best are misinterpreted and more wishful thinking than anything else. So what is it going to be, Windows is going to be abandoned and dead, the Windows kernel will be replaced with a Linux kernel, Windows will be a distro instead or Windows will become a subscription?

Edit: Even I do not agree with everything ChrisTitusTech says but, he is sensible in realizing that the Windows kernel will never be replaced by the Linux kernel. Listen to his video on the subject and you will know where I am coming from.
I'd say that thinking NT/NTFS is going to last forever is wishful thinking, it's obvious both are ageing and the only resolution is a ground up rewrite of the kernel as issues aren't being resolved by kernel updates alone. This is a lot of work, easier to use the Linux kernel/file system considering software should be communicating via API's and .DLL's and not directly with the kernel itself - Hence the reason Wine works so well.

Furthermore, Enterprise Windows is already available based on a subscription model, O365 is a very successful subscription model - I see no reason why Microsoft wont look into a variation of the subscription model under consumer variants of Windows. To state otherwise is simply ignoring certain realities and by definition 'wishful thinking'.
 
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