Stability and overclocking - what do you consider stable

Slade

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a weekend of prime 95 mixed. This has sustained my systems to last as much as 10+ years.
 

Pestluder

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Many moons ago I spent time with Prime testing, but when I got my current rig (Haswell-E) I had a hard time getting it stable - I remember something about avx loads...
It turned out that prime isn't a stability indicator for my usage - gaming and browsing.
So getting to the point - is it stable for your workload? Yes - good job, now go use it. No - time to tweak it again.
 

Zarathustra[H]

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Are we talking CPU or GPU?

Either way, I use the old school method. I expect 48 hours of overkill load (Prime95, Intel Burn Test, etc.) without any thread crashing.

This way you've validated that the worst case is stable, can throw anything at it you want, and never have to worry about it again.

Anything less than that is not stable to me.

I also arrive there using the old school method without any shortcuts.

1.) Start at default settings, except set all fans to max.
2.) Raise multiplier by one step.
3.) Run brief 15 minute stability test.
4.) If it passes, go back to #2.
5.) If it fails, raise core voltage by a tiny amount and go back to #3.
6.) keep looping until you either reach your max safe temp, or your max safe voltage
7.) Back down to last known 15 minute stable point.
8.) Run 48 hour stability test at these settings. (Check in on it occasionally to save time. If one thread crashes 9 hours in, you don't have to wait until the end of 48 hours to take action)
9.) If it fails, back down to a step just prior to that, and go back to #8.
10.) If it passes, Note max core temp observed at final settings during load test.
11.) Configure fans to target that temp
12.) You are done.

This is a little bit oversimplified as it ignores RAM speeds and other voltages in modern CPU's other than the core voltage, but it is an example

I know, many people don't have the patience to do it right anymore, but if you follow this approach you will always land at the max stable overclock ant the minimum possible voltage.

Never take shortcuts and skip to a later destination.

Never accept a setting which is unstable at high loads using the justification that "I don't load it that high". If it doesn't crash in games, but crashes in load tests, its still not stable
 
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Zarathustra[H]

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Many moons ago I spent time with Prime testing, but when I got my current rig (Haswell-E) I had a hard time getting it stable - I remember something about avx loads...
It turned out that prime isn't a stability indicator for my usage - gaming and browsing.
So getting to the point - is it stable for your workload? Yes - good job, now go use it. No - time to tweak it again.

Couldn't disagree more.

Either it is everything stable for the worst thing you could possibly throw at it for 48 hours, or it isn't stable.
 

alyjen

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Mar 24, 2011
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Couldn't disagree more.

Either it is everything stable for the worst thing you could possibly throw at it for 48 hours, or it isn't stable.
Question. What's your stand on WHEA errors that tend to plague Zen 3 platform with current BIOSes? I spend last weekend tweaking everything I could think of to get rid of them and I think I succeed. Problem is, before I noticed, I could run most challenging TM5 for few hours, no memory errors. On the same time, every now and then WHEA warring (not even an error) related to FLCK clock was recorded.
 

Zarathustra[H]

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Question. What's your stand on WHEA errors that tend to plague Zen 3 platform with current BIOSes? I spend last weekend tweaking everything I could think of to get rid of them and I think I succeed. Problem is, before I noticed, I could run most challenging TM5 for few hours, no memory errors. On the same time, every now and then WHEA warring (not even an error) related to FLCK clock was recorded.

I have not played with a Zen3 yet

By WHEA error, do you mean that which displays on a blue screen? I'm pretty sure is consider any blue screen "not stable". :p

But it seems like you are referring to something else. I haven't seen those. It seems like there is something funky going on, but I couldn't tell you if it is a BIOS issue, software issue or something else.

If you run something like Prime95, do any threads crash?
 

alyjen

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I have not played with a Zen3 yet

By WHEA error, do you mean that which displays on a blue screen? I'm pretty sure is consider any blue screen "not stable". :p

But it seems like you are referring to something else. I haven't seen those. It seems like there is something funky going on, but I couldn't tell you if it is a BIOS issue, software issue or something else.

If you run something like Prime95, do any threads crash?
I'm referring to this type of errors. It's not mine, I got rid of mine, at least with current setting, but before that I coud pass OCCT, Prime95, endless loops of Cinebench or TM5 no issues, yet windows event tracker was recording these warnings.

BR

1606142206589.png
 

Zarathustra[H]

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I'm referring to this type of errors. It's not mine, I got rid of mine, at least with current setting, but before that I coud pass OCCT, Prime95, endless loops of Cinebench or TM5 no issues, yet windows event tracker was recording these warnings.

BR

View attachment 302138
Hmm

I'm really not familiar enough with overclocking Zen at all, let alone Zen3 to say for sure, but this does look like the type of random error that occurrs when you are right on the hairy edge of stability, and probably should either give it a tiny bit more voltage, or drop down the clocks a little.

I will have to defer to someone with specific experience though to make sure.
 
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alyjen

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Hmm

I'm really not familiar enough with overclocking Zen at all, let alone Zen3 to say for sure, but this does look like the type of random error that occurrs when you are right on the hairy edge of sysbility, and probably should either give it a tiny bit more voltage, or drop down the clocks a little.

I will have to defer to someone with specific experience though to make sure.
yea + the buggy BIOS ;) it was the same with Zen 2 platform, for me it was a good lesson that you may seems stable (some people with this issues pushed hundreds of hours of workloads and gaming through their machines) and yet, there's something fishy in the background, not enough to impact stability and performance (some of WHEA errors can do that) but enough to trigger warning event ;)
 

Zarathustra[H]

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yea + the buggy BIOS ;) it was the same with Zen 2 platform, for me it was a good lesson that you may seems stable (some people with this issues pushed hundreds of hours of workloads and gaming through their machines) and yet, there's something fishy in the background, not enough to impact stability and performance (some of WHEA errors can do that) but enough to trigger warning event ;)

One thing I learned a long time ago is not to always assume that a higher clock is faster, but to bench it to make sure.

I've had many cases of my max stable overclock being slower than the next multiplier down

Sometimes as you reach the limit of what a system is capable of it starts having random issues. Maybe not enough to crash a thread in a stability test, but definitely enough to harm performance.

Maybe what is going on here is that the error correction in newer Zen chips can actually catch this and report it to the OS.

Not sure. It's an educated guess of a theory though :p
 
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