LG Electronics to launch quantum dot TVs

Discussion in 'Displays' started by illli, Dec 16, 2014.

  1. illli

    illli [H]ard|Gawd

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    Last edited: Dec 16, 2014
  2. HeavensCloud

    HeavensCloud Oswego, not shitty as Buffalo

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    Is this similar to Sharp's fourth yellow dot from way back when?
     
  3. x3sphere

    x3sphere 2[H]4U

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    It's no gamechanger, quantum dots just allow for OLED-like colors with increased saturation, but do nothing for black levels.

    Combined with FALD (full array local dimming) backlighting, though, it could be a big competitor to OLED next year. Supposedly Samsung will return to using FALD next year (the past few years all of its flagship sets have been edge-lit). I guess LG is preparing for this, in case it can't get OLED prices down far enough next year.

    OLED is still way superior tech though. With FALD you are relying on hardware and software to dim certain areas of the screen and it is not 100% accurate, sometimes you get haloing on high contrast areas also. There's also the higher refresh rate of OLED, something LCD can't match. Due to the tricks being used to achieve better black levels that also equals more processing whereas OLED just does it naturally.
     
  4. wirk

    wirk Gawd

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    No, it is a technique for generating better RGB backlight.

    OLED is no ideal though, there are problems with necessity of limiting maximal light output. LCD/QD+dense FALD can get practically better & cheaper than OLED.
     
  5. John721

    John721 [H]ard|Gawd

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    Sony uses quantum dot in their Triluminos TVs if memory serves. Anyone have thoughts on them?
     
  6. illli

    illli [H]ard|Gawd

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  7. seanclayton

    seanclayton Gawd

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    Nobody can deny the versatility of LCD tech. It has stand the test of time due its unbeatable durability and multi purpose usage. No burnins and severe degradation like plasma and OLED. Virtually limitless improvements can be made for it. It just continues to improve, and OLED will probably be killed off completely in the future.
     
  8. x3sphere

    x3sphere 2[H]4U

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    It'll be a shame if that is the case, LG believes OLED will be less expensive to produce than LCD in the future. Burn-in seems to be less of an issue for OLED than Plasma. With the LG TVs specifically - I haven't heard of any major problems with degradation or burn-in, granted they haven't been out that long yet.

    Implementing FALD on LCD sets adds significant cost also with a large number of zones needed to achieve decent black levels (which still end up being worse than Plasma or OLED). Not only that, the dimming of zones adds processing overhead which = more input lag. One of the reasons we haven't seen it implemented on any monitors most likely.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2014
  9. shae

    shae n00b

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    We're still with the same problems LCDs had since the dawn of time. Bad viewing angles, bad blacks, bad uniformity, and so on.

    I don't see why it should add much latency. The logic needed seems trivial.
     
  10. x3sphere

    x3sphere 2[H]4U

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    Maybe it's because most of them use a combination of hardware and software to control the dimming, I'm not completely sure. Many FALD sets have higher input lag than their edge-lit counterparts though and some completely disable local dimming when PC mode is on.
     
  11. shae

    shae n00b

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    I do wonder why most TVs have higher latencies than desktop monitors even when all processing is disabled. Some models are faster, like many recent Sony models, but even these are slower than typical desktop monitors.
     
  12. cbf123

    cbf123 n00b

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    I wonder if we'll ever see someone take FALD to the logical extreme...one backlight per pixel triad.

    As someone else said, there doesn't seem to be any technical reason why FALD would require additional latency--it's probably due to cost or speed of development. Seems like it would be possible to have some logic circuits that takes the input signal for each colour at each pixel and maps it to a backlight brightness, then combines them based on a formula. Should be relatively straightforward given today's tech.
     
  13. flod

    flod Gawd

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    :rolleyes:
    why stop there? make one backlight for each subpixel.
    oh wait that would make it just like that other type of display :D


    personally i think lcds are absolutely terrible for computer displays and that they should remain in pocket calculators and microwave displays.

    you can improve the gamut with qd backlighting, but that's not going to matter unless you have wide-gamut content that takes advantage of the extra gamut space.
    you can do fald, but it's far from ideal. just think about what happens when you're displaying a picture of some stars in a dark sky.
     
  14. shae

    shae n00b

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    That's why things are headed toward Rec. 2020.

    Still better than a uniform backlight, and reviews on recent FALD TVs, like Panasonic's, seem to indicate it does indeed look better.
     
  15. Corvette

    Corvette [H]ard|Gawd

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  16. jeremyshaw

    jeremyshaw [H]ardForum Junkie

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