Intel Pentium Overdrive Processor PODP5V83

scharfshutze009

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
May 22, 2010
Messages
1,956
Are you saying the following is incorrect:



If so what should the correct connections be?
I had my brother who is studying electrical engineering check the connections in this picture and it worked as it should because all that matters is that the Black is paired with the red or green, although preferablly with the red because it is power cord hot and the yellow should be paired with the green or red, but preferablly with the green because it is power cord neutral.
 
Last edited:

scharfshutze009

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
May 22, 2010
Messages
1,956


NC = Normally closed. Your switch has these pins removed, but they connect to the pole (center pins) when the switch is in the OFF position. If you were to use these, your computer would come on when the switch was turned off.

NO = Normally open, these pins are connected to the pole (center pin) when the switch is in the ON position. These are the pins you connect your PSU feed wires (blue and brown) to.

I may have the blue and brown backwards, but it shouldn't matter since this is AC power and the PSU mfg didnt do something stupid like ground to Neutral..
I checked with my dad who taught electricity classes at Stark State College and with my brother who is studying electrical engineering and you where right. However we determined that the following is the preferred connection with black paired with brown and white paired with blue because black is power supply hot and brown is power cord hot. While white is power supply neutral and blue is power cord neutral.

 

ryan_975

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Feb 6, 2006
Messages
14,620
I checked with my dad who taught electricity classes at Stark State College and with my brother who is studying electrical engineering and you where right. However we determined that the following is the preferred connection with black paired with brown and white paired with blue because black is power supply hot and brown is power cord hot. While white is power supply neutral and blue is power cord neutral.
It really doesn't matter which wire goes where as long as you're not shorting the wires coming from the wall. AC power is dumped straight into a rectifier bridge before being converted to the various DC outputs used by the system.. The inputs to the bridge can be reversed and it'll still output pulsating DC with the same polarity. Consider the case that you're usimg the 240v setting of the PSU. Those wires feeding the switch would be connected to two hots from the wall then. Most AC powered devices do not distinguish between a hot and a neutral. That's done for our safety.

Protip: It's best to always treat a Neutral to be just as capable of lighting you up as a Hot is. You never know when you have a floating neutral, broken earth bond, or just a bass-ackwards wiring job.
 

Emission

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Dec 6, 2005
Messages
4,306
It really doesn't matter which wire goes where as long as you're not shorting the wires coming from the wall. AC power is dumped straight into a rectifier bridge before being converted to the various DC outputs used by the system.. The inputs to the bridge can be reversed and it'll still output pulsating DC with the same polarity. Consider the case that you're usimg the 240v setting of the PSU. Those wires feeding the switch would be connected to two hots from the wall then. Most AC powered devices do not distinguish between a hot and a neutral. That's done for our safety.

Protip: It's best to always treat a Neutral to be just as capable of lighting you up as a Hot is. You never know when you have a floating neutral, broken earth bond, or just a bass-ackwards wiring job.
I don't know if I mentioned it in my earlier post but this is correct. With AC devices it doesn't really matter how neutral and hot are connected, but most plugs are polarized due to a safety feature. So in response to your above post, technically that wiring was incorrect for the original power supply, but as ryan_975 stated it gets rectified anyway so it truly doesn't matter as long as you're not crossing your input wires together obviously.

By the way is this similar the using the original push button switch like this:

It's hard to tell from the picture which terminals connect where (if it didn't have labels) but you could use a different style switch as long as you connected it to the power supply in the proper fashion and as long as it will handle the power (high enough volts/amps rating).
 

scharfshutze009

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
May 22, 2010
Messages
1,956
You can't emulate 3d acceleration in a Virtual Machine. If you do with any work arounds its extremely slow and I dont' have much interest in running classic games in software mode unless absolutely necessary.
Nevermind about this apparently the person I heard that you can't emulate 3d Acceleration with a Virtual Machine was full of it or was only talking about Microsoft Virtual PC and not VMware or Virtual Box, which are capable of emulating 3D acceleration. As originally stated though I just wanted to try out older hardware for fun or in an attempt to see what kind of obstacles I would run into and apparently booting from floppy is the main one because either I can't find a working floppy controller or a working floppy drive. Also, I wanted to see how far I could go back and do something meaningful as well as explore why computers have to be clocked at the speeds they are today. In addition, hope that this would help processor manufacturer or anyone develop cheaper and more efficient chips that might be capable of running at lower clock speeds. Until I get a floppy drive to boot this thread ain't going anywhere unless I find another way.
 

Ruoh

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Sep 16, 2009
Messages
5,858
Nevermind about this apparently the person I heard that you can't emulate 3d Acceleration with a Virtual Machine was full of it or was only talking about Microsoft Virtual PC and not VMware or Virtual Box, which are capable of emulating 3D acceleration.
You know, this post is over three years old. A lot has changed in the world of VMs.... Seriously... what's up with you and necro bumping today?
 

scharfshutze009

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
May 22, 2010
Messages
1,956
You know, this post is over three years old. A lot has changed in the world of VMs.... Seriously... what's up with you and necro bumping today?
I'm just recapping and informing on the status of this thread. I'm aware of the changes in VM's too because of Hyper-V and V-Spere or anything similar.
 

scharfshutze009

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
May 22, 2010
Messages
1,956
I'm just recapping and informing on the status of this thread. I'm aware of the changes in VM's too because of Hyper-V and V-Spere or anything similar.
Turns out I may sell this computer and this processor because I can't afford to complete the project. Also, I've found almost no use for a computer this old because finding software for something this old is almost impossible, since it's almost non-existant. I mean seriously were am I going to find games as old as Star Wars Dark Forces, Doom, any other Doom Game, Quake or anything else old enough to run on this machine on Floppy or CD-ROM. I own Quake on Steam and have a backup copy of the original CD-ROM game, since my original copy got scratched and ID or Activision Don't care and I can't find the product key considering the case is missing. I'd be amazed if Quake II could run on this Machine too especially with 3d acceleration too. Steam will not run on this machine at all, since it needs a 1 GHz processor to run on and there's no way in even in hell I'm going to be able to overclock it to 1 GHz if anyone says that in response. Finally, the last time I check the suppliers of the motherboard I need to get a floppy drive working wanted $500 for the motherboard, which just doesn't seem worth it or like a good investment and could be better spent on something newer as well as more capable of running available software. i knew all this when I started this project too, but wanted to see how far I could go back and do something meaningful and I found the answer to be a 1 GHZ processor compatible computer or higher and even that is pushing it as newer and newer things become available. The thing is that the 486 and Pentium OD are extremely rare and valuable because they contain a lot of gold. I just checked and the motherboard can't be found on eBay at the moment anyway.
 

scharfshutze009

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
May 22, 2010
Messages
1,956
This was incredible
Thanks. Here's the pictures that got messed up because photobucket wanted me to pay for 3rd party hosting in order to put pictures on a forum, like Hard Forum now:

The processor box



and

The Computer previously before adding the cd-rw drive and removing the mobile racks with 50-pin SCSI HD's



and

A picture of it posting:



and

A picture of the internal boards, expansion cards, cables, and everything else

 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: TMCM
like this

scharfshutze009

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
May 22, 2010
Messages
1,956
This was incredible
Here's a video of it posting, which is all it can do because it's so old that the technology didn't support boot from Optical Media being CD-ROM at the time and the floppy drive controller doesn't work. Also, I know the camera work is terrible, but I was using my previous cell phone when I recorded it and I couldn't afford an actual video camera at that time not even now:

 
  • Like
Reactions: TMCM
like this

ironforge

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Feb 7, 2006
Messages
1,235
Turns out I may sell this computer and this processor because I can't afford to complete the project. Also, I've found almost no use for a computer this old because finding software for something this old is almost impossible, since it's almost non-existant. I mean seriously were am I going to find games as old as Star Wars Dark Forces, Doom, any other Doom Game, Quake or anything else old enough to run on this machine on Floppy or CD-ROM. I own Quake on Steam and have a backup copy of the original CD-ROM game, since my original copy got scratched and ID or Activision Don't care and I can't find the product key considering the case is missing. I'd be amazed if Quake II could run on this Machine too especially with 3d acceleration too. Steam will not run on this machine at all, since it needs a 1 GHz processor to run on and there's no way in even in hell I'm going to be able to overclock it to 1 GHz if anyone says that in response. Finally, the last time I check the suppliers of the motherboard I need to get a floppy drive working wanted $500 for the motherboard, which just doesn't seem worth it or like a good investment and could be better spent on something newer as well as more capable of running available software. i knew all this when I started this project too, but wanted to see how far I could go back and do something meaningful and I found the answer to be a 1 GHZ processor compatible computer or higher and even that is pushing it as newer and newer things become available. The thing is that the 486 and Pentium OD are extremely rare and valuable because they contain a lot of gold. I just checked and the motherboard can't be found on eBay at the moment anyway.
The old games are still around and collectable.. I have some old games burned onto a 1x speed cd-r still. Back when a blank CD-R was $20+ for one disc! Quake was shareware for the first level also should be easy to download. You would need a 3d card to run the GLQuake version though.

Love the pics! I remember the Intel Overdrive chips when they came out.
 

dexvx

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Aug 14, 2002
Messages
1,111
Oh man, it's boxed even. LMK if you're going to sell.

I have a POD5V133, made for Socket 4 original Pentium's. The Socket 3 platform was so long lived. You could've gotten a 486 SX25/33, dropped in upgrade to 486 DX2/66. And final upgrade to Pentium 83 or AMD 5x86 133. Literally 4x the performance.
 

scharfshutze009

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
May 22, 2010
Messages
1,956
Oh man, it's boxed even. LMK if you're going to sell.

I have a POD5V133, made for Socket 4 original Pentium's. The Socket 3 platform was so long lived. You could've gotten a 486 SX25/33, dropped in upgrade to 486 DX2/66. And final upgrade to Pentium 83 or AMD 5x86 133. Literally 4x the performance.
No It's not boxed technically because the processor is in the computer with the Amptron DX9700 Motherboard, but I do still have the box though and papers or instructions that came with it. It's actually open box.
 

brentsg

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Mar 8, 2003
Messages
1,707
I remember when I was working on my graduate thesis, it was like 300 pages and had graphs and equations on every page. I ran into limits regarding how many of these things could be in a document so I had to switch from Word to Lotus Ami Pro in the middle and do rework.

I also started the thing with a 486 33 that I upgraded to a 66 with the Overdrive processor. I needed all kinds of boost to hard drives and RAM, so I finally ordered a Micron P133 system that was loaded up. That did the trick but took money I didn't have.

I also had a Cray Y-MP account at Allied Signal in Kansas City, for the heavy lifting.

Old.
 

scharfshutze009

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
May 22, 2010
Messages
1,956
Oh man, it's boxed even. LMK if you're going to sell.

I have a POD5V133, made for Socket 4 original Pentium's. The Socket 3 platform was so long lived. You could've gotten a 486 SX25/33, dropped in upgrade to 486 DX2/66. And final upgrade to Pentium 83 or AMD 5x86 133. Literally 4x the performance.
Thanks, but I'm looking for Socket 3 with PCI slots and slot cache versus ISA and VESA only as well as cache sockets because I want to get and see the maxium benefit of some of the first 3D accelerators that I missed during that era as well as don't want to deal with chip creep and fake chips commonly associated with cache chip that use sockets.
 

scharfshutze009

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
May 22, 2010
Messages
1,956
I remember when I was working on my graduate thesis, it was like 300 pages and had graphs and equations on every page. I ran into limits regarding how many of these things could be in a document so I had to switch from Word to Lotus Ami Pro in the middle and do rework.

I also started the thing with a 486 33 that I upgraded to a 66 with the Overdrive processor. I needed all kinds of boost to hard drives and RAM, so I finally ordered a Micron P133 system that was loaded up. That did the trick but took money I didn't have.

I also had a Cray Y-MP account at Allied Signal in Kansas City, for the heavy lifting.

Old.
Yea, this is old, but I wanted to see how old of a system I could run WIndows XP on and the maxium benefit of one of the earliest motherboards to support PCI and 3D accelerators. I remember being high school when this stuff was mainstream and couldn't afford it too as well as having the same frustration you had with it being slow when using other peoples computers, so I understand some of what you mean and just didn't have to deal with it directly until my Dad got our family our first new computer after our Uncle gave us a computer based off an Intel 286 processor, which the new computer was an IBM Aptiva based on an AMD K6 233 MHz processor and integrated graphics proved to be the problem with that later when trying to use 2D/3D card upgrades and not 3D only accelorators except the Matrox Millenium because it needed at least 2 MB of 2D memory and the onboard ATI Rage II with 1 MB would only allow for OpenGL acceleration instead of Direct X too with the Matrox.
 
Last edited:

Dan_D

Extremely [H]
Joined
Feb 9, 2002
Messages
56,024
I was always against these processors as a general rule. I saw them used on a lot of ISA / VLB based systems with slower memory. Sure the processor was the real deal, but it was constrained by older motherboard platforms and therefore was of limited value for the price you paid for those. In some specific cases these weren't always horrible. The Pentium II overdrive processors that went onto socket 8 motherboards weren't so bad. Architecturally, until we got AGP motherboards later on these were fine.
 
Joined
Jan 21, 2018
Messages
5
I remember buying one of theses processors at my local Wal-Mart. Man, this brought back some memories. Thanks for sharing.
 

somebrains

Gawd
Joined
Nov 10, 2013
Messages
962
Mmmm, my first real PC was a dual P2-233 on a Supermicro board with (gasp) agp and a Voodoo3.
Everyone else had 486's of some kind.
I even had DSL when it first appeared in San Francisco.
Big ol 24" Sony tube monitor overflowing a flimsy metal ikea PC desk.

The money I've wasted on gaming hardware in the past 25 years wasn't that bad.

I've always been about GPU and the biggest high society monitor I could get my hands on.
 

scharfshutze009

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
May 22, 2010
Messages
1,956
I tried to install Damn Small Linux via the optical drive the weekend before last and it was a no go still, becauss of the bad IDE and floppy controller or lack of boot from CD-ROM or optical media option, so it looks like I'll have to use an IDE to compact flash reader and maybe use another computer to install either Damn Small Linux or Windows 98 SE on to a compact flash card.
 

scharfshutze009

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
May 22, 2010
Messages
1,956
I checked again for a lower requirement Operating System than Damn Small and found that Tiny Core, Crunch Bang, and Arch Bang won't work as well as Puppy, which requires a bootable CD-ROM compatible computer as thing is not because if it was the BIOS update to support it is not available and if the BIOS update was then the computer probably wouldn't boot from floppy anyway as it won't boot from floppy at all or hasn't since the beginning of it's assembly as well as first successful attempt to get it to POST with a possible working floppy drive with what seems to be a bad IDE controller regardless of if I use an Ad on SCSI controller card or IDE controller card.
 
Top