Intel i7-930 Revisit - Nehalem Benchmarks in 2017 vs. SB, Phenom, More (GamersNexus)

-Sweeper_

Limp Gawd
Joined
Jul 2, 2016
Messages
184
GamersNexus said:
Our newest revisit could also be considered our oldest: the Nehalem microarchitecture is nearly ten years old now, having launched in November 2008 after an initial showing at Intel’s 2007 Developer Forum, and we’re back to revive our i7-930 in 2017.

The sample chosen for these tests is another from the GN personal stash, a well-traveled i7-930 originally from Steve’s own computer that saw service in some of our very first case reviews, but has been mostly relegated to the shelf o’ chips since 2013. The 930 was one of the later Nehalem CPUs, released in Q1 2010 for $294, exactly one year ahead of the advent of the still-popular Sandy Bridge architecture. That includes the release of the i7-2600K, which we’ve already revisited in detail.

Sandy Bridge was a huge step for Intel, but Nehalem processors were actually the first generation to be branded with the now-familiar i5 and i7 naming convention (no i3s, though). A couple features make these CPUs worth a look today: Hyperthreading was (re)introduced with i7 chips, meaning that even the oldest generation of i7s has 4C/8T, and overclocking could offer huge leaps in performance often limited by heat and safe voltages rather than software stability or artificial caps.


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www.gamersnexus.net/guides/2980-intel-i7-930-revisit-nehalem-benchmarks-2017
 

Nihilus1

Limp Gawd
Joined
Jun 7, 2015
Messages
441
Had a Xeon 3440 back in the day. Beast of a chip at the time. 3.8 ghz folding stable with 2.5 ghz stock clocks.
 

EvilViking

I Drank All Your Beer
Joined
Mar 7, 2005
Messages
1,341
Amazing how well it does after 10 years.

I have a x58 i7 930 sitting here collecting dust. Ssd, 7770, 24gb ram.....I need to figure out what to do with it
 
D

Deleted whining member 223597

Guest
There is a reason why it was a 2.8/3.06Ghz chip on its 45nm process ;)

Yep, it was one of the main reasons I switched to my i7 3770K back in the day. I got tired of all the heat from my W3520 (920). Performance really didn't feel like it improved all that much.
 
Joined
Sep 9, 2005
Messages
786
Main reason why they are so cheap compared to the other two they compared against (2600K/1055) is because people still rocking the boards are dumping the i7s for those sweet, sweet 6-core 32nm Xeon CPUs.
 

johnnow

n00b
Joined
Feb 17, 2006
Messages
13
My 930 rig was my main computer right up until it died a few weeks ago. It performed well enough, especially after I upgraded the hard drive to a ssd, that I never felt the need to replace it.
 
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