Apple, Qualcomm and HiSilicon Drop Some 7nm Orders

AlphaAtlas

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Citing a report from the Chinese-language Commercial Times, Digitimes claims that TSMC's 7nm capacity is "unlikely to be fully utilized in 2019". The report cites recent cutbacks in orders from Apple, HiSilicon and Qualcomm, which means those companies could foresee a slump in the smartphone and mobile market. Globalfoundries recently dropped out of the bleeding edge lithography race, and some worried that TSMC's manufacturing capacity might be stretched a little thin as a consequence, but it looks like demand for 7nm wasn't as high as they feared.

TSMC disclosed previously the company is set to tape out more than 50 chip designs with its 7nm process technology by the end of 2018 and over 100 chip designs with both its 7nm and enhanced 7nm with EUV nodes by the end of 2019. TSMC expects 7nm chip sales to account for more than 20% of its total wafer revenues in the fourth quarter of 2018, and nearly 10% in all of the year. The proportion will likely exceed 20% in 2019.
 
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Zarathustra[H]

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Wasn't the smart phone market supposed to kill the PC?

Smartphones have rather quickly in the last few years gotten to the same point of stagnation where we are with PC's.

15-20 years ago, if you had a 1-2 year old PC it was practically obsolete, at least for gaming purposes. These days I'm on a 7 year old CPU and it's running fine.

Same has happened with phones. Only a few years ago a one year old phone felt slow and hopelessly outdated. Today I'm on a 2 year old Pixel, and apart from the battery aging, it feels perfectly fine.

At this point the advances in both phones and PC's have been slowed down by the increasing difficulty of process die shrinks

In other words, just like with PC's 10 years ago, today most people aleady have phones they seem "good enough" slowing down sales of new models, and thus freeing up some fab capacity.
 
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Aireoth

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Smartphones have rather quickly in the last few years gotten to the same point of stagnation where we are with PC's.

15-20 years ago, if you had a 1-2 year old PC it was practically obsolete, at least for gaming purposes. These days I'm on a 7 year old CPU and it's running fine.

Same has happened with phones. Only a few years ago a one year old phone felt slow and hopelessly outdated. Today I'm on a 2 year old Pixel, and apart from the battery aging, it feels perfectly fine.

At this point both phones and PC's have been slowed down by the increasing difficulty of process die shrinks

In other words, just like with PC's 10 years ago, today most people aleady have phones they seem "good enough" slowing down sales of new models, and thus freeing up some fab capacity.

That and they cost a stupid amount these days.
 

Zarathustra[H]

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That AAPL performance since October...


Screenshot_20181205-114133~2.png
 

ZippZ

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Hope this allows AMD to get more 7nm wafers manufactured and allow Ryzen 7nm to be launched ahead of schedule.
 

Zarathustra[H]

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Hope this allows AMD to get more 7nm wafers manufactured and allow Ryzen 7nm to be launched ahead of schedule.

Yeah, I read this headline and I mediately though, this is bad news for Intel. AMD will definitely be able to capitalize on this with Zen2.
 

steakman1971

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Smartphones have rather quickly in the last few years gotten to the same point of stagnation where we are with PC's.

15-20 years ago, if you had a 1-2 year old PC it was practically obsolete, at least for gaming purposes. These days I'm on a 7 year old CPU and it's running fine.

Same has happened with phones. Only a few years ago a one year old phone felt slow and hopelessly outdated. Today I'm on a 2 year old Pixel, and apart from the battery aging, it feels perfectly fine.

At this point the advances in both phones and PC's have been slowed down by the increasing difficulty of process die shrinks

In other words, just like with PC's 10 years ago, today most people aleady have phones they seem "good enough" slowing down sales of new models, and thus freeing up some fab capacity.
They are both mature platforms that have stagnated - we likely won't be seeing massive speed gains like we did in the 90's with PC's. I have an Intel 2600k CPU that still runs great. I'm planning an upgrade this spring - mainly so I can give this computer to one of my kids.
I'm honestly not expecting to notice much of a difference in my normal computer usage when I do upgrade. I was looking at the 2700x, but am going to wait for the new Ryzen chips. If I get 16 threads as opposed to the 8 I currently have, I might see benefits during certain tasks - but otherwise, assume I won't really notice it.
 
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