2kW+ PSU options?

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Looking at upgrading from quad Turing GPUs to quad 3090s and having a little trouble finding a PSU which can handle the load. I'd really like to avoid dual supplies if possible.

The EVGA Supernova 2000 looks nice, but 2kW doesn't leave a lot of overhead for anything beyond the GPUs. Did the 2200 ever make it to North America?
 

Tsumi

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I think a large part of it is due to household 120v limitations. The typical household has 15 or 20 amp circuit breakers, which means a circuit would top out at 2400 watts. Factoring efficiency overhead, a 2000 watt 90% efficient PSU close at 18.5 amps. Factor in monitor and other accessories, and you are likely pushing over 20 amps on 120 volts.

In addition to the above restriction, the consumer market for a 2+ kw PSU is extremely small, which is likely why they never really made it over to the US.
 

GiGaBiTe

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No matter if you find a 2 kW+ PSU, or have to use two PSUs; You're going to have to install a second power circuit to your computer area. Either a second 120v circuit, or a dedicated 240v circuit to be pulling that kind of power.
 
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No matter if you find a 2 kW+ PSU, or have to use two PSUs; You're going to have to install a second power circuit to your computer area. Either a second 120v circuit, or a dedicated 240v circuit to be pulling that kind of power.

That's the plan. I already have two dedicated 20A 120V circuits for the computer. I was thinking I would convert one to 240V if I could find a suitable power supply.

I read somewhere today that the mythical Supernova 2200 didn't accept 60hz input, so that has eliminated it from contention even if I could find one.
 

Ready4Dis

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I would prefer to change over to 240v at that point, as the wire size for 20a is the same whether you're using 120v or 240v. I'm pretty sure at this point electrical code in most areas probably requires a 4-wire connector, but there are plenty of 3-prong 240v outlets available (may need to check in your area). If you can get by with a 3-prong and you don't have anything else on your circuit, you could just get a 240v breaker and plug in your existing wiring on one end, and new outlet on the other end and not even have to run a new wire and be able to pull twice the watts through it. Even if it's only able to support 15-amps, that's still 3,600watts, if it's 20-amp, you can get up to 4,800watts. Dual PSU's can be a real hassle and I would avoid if you can. There isn't a great way to isolate the power supplies completely unless you use a PCIE extender that you can supply power directly into (like mining rigs do, but those are mostly 1x slots). Otherwise you have to be careful that the PSU is made for it, or you have some sort of power aggregation that can handle 2 PSU's that may not be supplying the exact same voltages (I have never researched these, so my terminology is probably off). You can find a lot of mining PSU's, but they are typically non-standard cases, so you may have to adapt them if you were to go this route. A side benefit of going to 240v is that most PSU's are more efficient at 240v than they are at 120v as well.

Bleh, after looking around, these are a pita to find, lol. I can only find non-standard ones (or at least for a normal PC) which would be a pain to mount into a normal case. Well, sorry I couldn't be much help honestly, after doing a little bit of looking around, I'm not sure what the best course of action is, so take what I said above with a grain of salt. It sounds good in theory, but if you can't find a PSU to fit, it won't help. Although, even if you have to go dual PSU, 240vac is still more efficient and can still use a single drop to power both PSU's.
 
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Ended up buying the EVGA Supernova 2000 G+ from Newegg. Even though the second bullet on the product listing says "80 PLUS Gold certified, with 90% (115VAC) / 92% (220VAC~240VAC) efficiency or higher under typical loads" AND the seller threw a NEMA 5-15 cord into the shipping box, this PSU is 220V only. That's ok since I was planning to convert the circuit anyway, but this means I can't even do a test boot until after I've had the electrician over. What a PITA.
 

Tsumi

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That doesn't sound right. Modern APFC PSUs should be capable of 100-240 VAC.
 

Zarathustra[H]

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Wow. That's a lot of juice.

Have you already been able to get your hands on the 3090's (if so, that's impressive) or is this a future plan type of build?
 

GiGaBiTe

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Ended up buying the EVGA Supernova 2000 G+ from Newegg. Even though the second bullet on the product listing says "80 PLUS Gold certified, with 90% (115VAC) / 92% (220VAC~240VAC) efficiency or higher under typical loads" AND the seller threw a NEMA 5-15 cord into the shipping box, this PSU is 220V only. That's ok since I was planning to convert the circuit anyway, but this means I can't even do a test boot until after I've had the electrician over. What a PITA.

Live dangerously! Lop off a plug and shove wires into the dryer socket, you don't need no hippie approved connector to get in the way of you and your man box.

Else you can go on down to the home despot and get a dryer plug pigtail and rig up a cable to power your shiny new PSU.
 
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Wow. That's a lot of juice.

Have you already been able to get your hands on the 3090's (if so, that's impressive) or is this a future plan type of build?
lol I wish. The way this "launch" is going so far, I won't be able to get them until late 2021. So, the new build will still be running the Titans until Nvidia finally gets some stock of the unicorns. The new PSU is planning ahead for when I'm able to get the 3090s. If they're 350W each, then that's 1400W alone. Since these are long duration loads (usually about a day, but not uncommonly 10+ days), I really should try to stay under 80% loading. This would be 87.5% just from the GPUs if I stuck with the AX1600i. The 2kW EVGA gives me 200W of additional load beyond the GPUs while staying under 80%.

Live dangerously! Lop off a plug and shove wires into the dryer socket, you don't need no hippie approved connector to get in the way of you and your man box.

Else you can go on down to the home despot and get a dryer plug pigtail and rig up a cable to power your shiny new PSU.
While I'm drawn to the excitement of energy and chaos, I'm much more comfortable with the boredom of structure. So, I had a licensed guy over who swapped the existing 20A circuit over to 220 and put a code-compliant outlet on it. It's like a 110V 20A outlet, except the opposite tine is turned 90deg. It was kind of tempting to go for a full 40A dryer outlet just to say I did, but finding cables for that would be a real PITA with no real benefit since I'm never going to be running a single machine over 4kW anyway.
 

Nobu

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That doesn't sound right. Modern APFC PSUs should be capable of 100-240 VAC.
Probably has to do with efficiency/current capacity: 220 can easily do 2kw on a 15a circuit (220v x 15a = 3300va), whereas it would have to derate if it dropped too low (110v x 15a = 1650va, meaning you lose nearly 18% of the capacity before factoring efficiency losses). A 20a circuit could barely handle 2kw before factoring in losses, but their PSU might not meet the efficiency spec they claim at that voltage.
 

GiGaBiTe

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While I'm drawn to the excitement of energy and chaos, I'm much more comfortable with the boredom of structure. So, I had a licensed guy over who swapped the existing 20A circuit over to 220 and put a code-compliant outlet on it. It's like a 110V 20A outlet, except the opposite tine is turned 90deg. It was kind of tempting to go for a full 40A dryer outlet just to say I did, but finding cables for that would be a real PITA with no real benefit since I'm never going to be running a single machine over 4kW anyway.

I think that's either a 5-20 or 6-20 NEMA connector. Not really a fan of those because I've seen people who know just enough to be dangerous make "adapters" or cut the ends of 120v plugs off and put the 5/6-20 connector on and end up with lots of excitement when they plugged the thing in. But it's in your own home so you know it won't be a problem.

The only thing I'd suggest is feeling the connector when you have a high load on it to see if it gets uncomfortably warm.
 

drescherjm

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At work I like the round locking style L5-30P (125V 30A) we have on a few UPSs.

They have the L6 series for 250V.
 
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I think that's either a 5-20 or 6-20 NEMA connector. Not really a fan of those because I've seen people who know just enough to be dangerous make "adapters" or cut the ends of 120v plugs off and put the 5/6-20 connector on and end up with lots of excitement when they plugged the thing in. But it's in your own home so you know it won't be a problem.

The only thing I'd suggest is feeling the connector when you have a high load on it to see if it gets uncomfortably warm.
I went with a certified premade 6-20 -> C-19 cord. Turns out that McMaster of all places carries them.

I also went to power on the build for the first time last night and I think something inside of the PSU exploded (probably a giant cap, maybe several of them). It was about as loud as a small caliber pistol. Almost needed the 220 feed to restart my heart.

Needless to say, I'm not a happy camper right now.
 

drescherjm

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It was about as loud as a small caliber pistol.

I have had a similar experience with a 15K USD medical imaging monitor however it was not mine and it was fixed under warranty. The engineers even sent me a picture of the part that caused the short and their plan to redesign the part and the shipping container.
 

GiGaBiTe

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I went with a certified premade 6-20 -> C-19 cord. Turns out that McMaster of all places carries them.

I also went to power on the build for the first time last night and I think something inside of the PSU exploded (probably a giant cap, maybe several of them). It was about as loud as a small caliber pistol. Almost needed the 220 feed to restart my heart.

Needless to say, I'm not a happy camper right now.

If one of the line capacitors went off, it would have deformed the PSU housing. I'd guess that the bridge rectifier and/or the switching mosfets failed. As to why they failed, it could be several different possibilities. The big three that come to mind are:

1) Wiring fault with the 240v plug. I'd check across the two tangs with a multimeter to see what the actual voltage is.
2) Defective/incorrect PSU. Maybe EVGA incorrectly labelled a 115v PSU as a 240V unit? PSU could have also been defective.
3) Something got inside the PSU housing and shorted parts of the PSU out, so when power was applied, it went bang.

It'd be interesting to open up the supply and see what failed, but I'm sure you want to return it to EVGA for a refund or replacement. The problem is though, you don't know if it would happen again. I would get a cheap universal ATX PSU, or even a non-PFC unit in 220/240v mode and plug it into your dedicated 240v outlet to see if it behaves or not. You'll have to make an adapter though.
 
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I took a look from the outside and can't see anything in there that looks exploded and it doesn't smell like burning, so maybe the bang wasn't from the PSU. It was loud enough that it was difficult to identify the exact location. Since the breaker didn't trip and nothing caught on fire, I have to imagine that the circuit is fine and the bang was from the PSU. I have a couple of spare autoswitching Corsair PSUs sitting on the shelf. I might try again with the cheaper one of those and see what happens.

Good news is that the motherboard and CPU appear to be fine. I gave it a successful test boot into BIOS tonight using one of the Corsair units connected to a different circuit.

The EVGA unit was bought from a seller on NewEgg based in China, so I'm sure the RMA process will be loads of fun.
 

toast0

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I would prefer to change over to 240v at that point, as the wire size for 20a is the same whether you're using 120v or 240v. I'm pretty sure at this point electrical code in most areas probably requires a 4-wire connector, but there are plenty of 3-prong 240v outlets available (may need to check in your area). If you can get by with a 3-prong and you don't have anything else on your circuit, you could just get a 240v breaker and plug in your existing wiring on one end, and new outlet on the other end and not even have to run a new wire and be able to pull twice the watts through it.
I've been doing some electrical work lately, and haven't seen anything about requiring 4-wires for 240v; my barn appears to be to code (there's inspection certificates up anyway), and most of the 240v are L6 with just a three wire feed (hot,hot, ground), although a couple are L14 with hot,hot,neutral, ground.
 

GiGaBiTe

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I've been doing some electrical work lately, and haven't seen anything about requiring 4-wires for 240v; my barn appears to be to code (there's inspection certificates up anyway), and most of the 240v are L6 with just a three wire feed (hot,hot, ground), although a couple are L14 with hot,hot,neutral, ground.

A lot of older houses have a third option, hot-hot-neutral, with an optional ground bonded to the neutral so it can be both or just neutral.
 

Ready4Dis

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I've been doing some electrical work lately, and haven't seen anything about requiring 4-wires for 240v; my barn appears to be to code (there's inspection certificates up anyway), and most of the 240v are L6 with just a three wire feed (hot,hot, ground), although a couple are L14 with hot,hot,neutral, ground.
Like I said, check local rules, I'm not an electrician, but I know you can run 240 over 3 wires, not sure if the latest rules still allow it or if 4 is now required. If it's an older installation, it only has to adhere to the code at the time of inspection, it doesn't mean it's up to current code standards, just that it was when installed ;). I don't know for sure what the rules are for specific applications so I just say as precaution to check your local codes.
 
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