World Wide Web creator, Tim Berners-Lee, sad to see his invention being used for evil, hatches plan to take it back

Delicieuxz

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Tim Berners-Lee’s plan to save the internet: give us back control of our data
Releasing his creation for free 30 years ago, the inventor of the world wide web, Tim Berners-Lee, famously declared: “this is for everyone”. Today, his invention is used by billions – but it also hosts the authoritarian crackdowns of antidemocratic governments, and supports the infrastructure of the most wealthy and powerful companies on Earth.

Now, in an effort to return the internet to the golden age that existed before its current incarnation as Web 2.0 – characterised by invasive data harvesting by governments and corporations – Berners-Lee has devised a plan to save his invention.

This involves his brand of “data sovereignty” – which means giving users power over their data – and it means wrestling back control of the personal information we surrendered to big tech many years ago.

Berners-Lee’s latest intervention comes as increasing numbers of people regard the online world as a landscape dominated by a few tech giants, thriving on a system of “surveillance capitalism” – which sees our personal data extracted and harvested by online giants before being used to target advertisements at us as we browse the web.


World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee takes on Google, Facebook, Amazon to fix the internet
"The next wave is about artificial intelligence," Verdegem said. "Companies and governments will use all that data to train algorithms to come up with better deep learning models. And as (Russian President) Vladimir Putin once said, the person who is in charge of artificial intelligence will dominate the world."

But Berners-Lee and his business partner, John Bruce, have come up with an alternative to fight back against this consolidation of power.

They have launched a startup company, Inrupt.com, that allows consumers, rather than companies, to control their own data, to store it in pods and to move it wherever they please.

That means Facebook, Google or any other Big Tech company will no longer be able to extract an individual's photos, comments or purchase history without asking. All of that will be stored on a pod, and the individual can share the information with the company if he or she chooses.

"We are on a mission to change the way the web works, to make it a better place for all of us," said Berners-Lee in a November YouTube video with Technology Intelligence Live. "It's a mid-course correction to restore the values of individual and group empowerment that the internet used to have and seems to have lost."

Verdegem, who recently wrote about Inrupt in The Conversation, said his main criticism of the company is that an individual's data isn't worth that much. It's only in the aggregate that data is really valuable to a company like Google or Facebook.

But maybe that's not the way data should be looked at anyway, Verdegem said. It should be looked at as something that's not owned by individuals or companies, but by society.

That sounds like a silly conclusion, to me. Yes, personal data shouldn't be looked-at firstly as monetary value, because it isn't firstly a monetary thing and it has no monetary value if it isn't for sale per the will of the person who owns it. But no, personal data isn't owned by society, each individual person's personal data is owned by them. Suggesting it is owned by society sounds like a way to concede that it doesn't belong to corporations while rationalizing that industries should have some means of access to it all the same.


In general, I think that Tim Berners-Lee's plan is a positive idea, compared to where things are. But I think that most of that data should be prohibited by law from being collected and stored in the first place. And what happens if Inrupt's data-stores are hacked? There goes the privacy the privacy and personal control of one's data that the idea was meant to protect.

I think the issue needs to be addressed at its source rather than with a coping mechanism which I think would be destined to fail. At some point, likely even from the outset, governments would have gained access to that vault of information and the public likely won't know about it when it happens.


The business of harvesting data is a dirty, illegitimate, predatory, and hypocritical one. It is making money through the exploitation and manipulation of people and is a crime - and not just a moral one (though, it is definitely a moral one):

What do you think would happen if you were to hook a Bitcoin mining operation up to the electricity supply of some business you don't own, without their permission and without compensating them? If they found out, they would have you arrested and if the operation was significant, they'd sue you, and would probably get to seize any profits you'd made while using their electricity.

There's not really even a need to frame things in cryptocoin-mining terms. Imagine that you decided to start using various businesses computers, electricity, employee activities, software, housing, as data farms for your own project, just like they're doing with our PCs. Same thing's going to happen: You'll be arrested and charged, probably sued, and any profits you made will probably be seized and given to the corporation.

But tech companies are doing the same thing to us and they're not being punished for it in any way. In generating and harvesting data from our particular usage and via interaction with our devices, tech companies are using our electricity, our hardware, our storage and management of our hardware, our software, our time, our personal activity, for their own commercial purposes, and all without a commercial license. They're stealing. And it's crazy that it's been allowed to progress this far, that the public is in a stupor and doesn't understand that this isn't right.

Somehow, the public, governments, and regulators have been lured into a stupor and coma regarding the topic just because tech companies started doing these things before there was any understanding of them, and so now people feel like it's just the way things are. But that's like thinking that stealing what isn't yours and slavery are just the way things are.

Tech companies whose business is mining and selling data are stealing from us in the same way that a politician who steals millions of dollars out of the treasury is stealing from their constituents. Even though the millions of dollars they stole amounts to a few dollars, or even less than a dollar per person, the smallness of the stealing from each individual doesn't make it not stealing.



Some methods to reduce the amount of data being stolen from you and used for commercial and manipulative purposes include:

- Using DuckDuckGo for web searches. They don't store or collect any personal data.

- Using only an Enterprise or LTSC edition of Windows 10 as they afford for lowering the amount of data Microsoft takes from you beyond what Home and Pro allow. And Microsoft is tracking every mouse-click you make in Windows 10.

- Using ProtonMail for you email. It has end-to-end encryption and your inbox is encrypted with a user encryption key so that ProtonMail can't view it, either.

- Installing Electronic Frontier Foundation's browser plugin Privacy Badger [2] [3], which blocks a lot of tracking scripts.

- Possibly using an ad-blocker to reduce the amount of tracking and advertisement scripts websites can run when you browse their website.

- Making use of FireFox browser's built-in Facebook-tracking-blocking feature.

- Using your iPhones built-in option to block all tracking by apps.

- Setting your DNS resolver to Cloudflare's free 1.1.1.1 service. This prevents your ISP from recording your activity and searches and selling it. Cloudflare doesn't collect or sell any of your data and doesn't record any IPs. Cloudflare also has a mobile app that sets your mobile internet usage to its 1.1.1.1 service. Cloudflare say of their 1.1.1.1 service:
Here’s the deal - we don’t store client IP addresses never, ever, and we only use query names for things that improve DNS resolver performance (such as prefill all caches based on popular domains in a region and/or after obfuscation, APNIC research).

Cloudflare will never store any information in our logs that identifies an end user, and all logs collected by our public resolver will be deleted within 24 hours. We will continue to abide by our privacy policy and ensure that no user data is sold to advertisers or used to target consumers.


If you know of additional methods to secure your data and privacy, please share them.
 
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Shikami

Gawd
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Messages
767
I really, really do get where you are coming from. You are very close to the actuality of things. There are just some things. Mainly DNS resolution that I would like to comment on. Any packet of any bit (no pun intended) that traverses will be and is examined somewhere. They ALL lie, and sell your data. They all collect, gather, and become lucrative with your data and have been for a long, long, long time. If it is free, it is a lie. If it is paid for, it is still a lie when concerning data collection and selling. They know more about you than you know about yourself (q.v. Facebook, Google). We can implement some things, but in all honesty it is not only punitive due to inverse relationship of countermeasures, but also difficult with modern times in which they have manipulated us into (q.v. cashless transactions). We are slowly being constrained into "their ways." The only way, the only true path, is to eliminate any usage or giving of any energy to them. In other words, like with security, the only way to be near close to secure with technology is not to use it, but that doesn't work well in modern society as I noted on how we are being constrained into their ways.

On that note, Cloudflare is NOT benevolent. This is including many companies and people that we think are, are not. Settings can be implemented to prevent some DPI, meta-injections, and such in transition through them and encrypted. But lookups are read, counted, and categorized by them always. They are also, IIRC, an alphabet co-consp....aaaah, co-something. If we can utilize our own DNS servicing to lockdown lookups, and prevent third parties DNS's within our networks that is just a small gain (not a win). It is the better way of things for now, and can be frustrating when something doesn't work for the troubleshooting path is complicated with this in usage.

Having pfSense, OPNSense, or PiHole for our networking needs is critical. Being able to thwart networking trickery and compromise is valuable. Blocking domains, controlling lookups, and even preventing trans-Pacific-Atlantic traversal can be advantageous. The networking performance can be even greater with low power and high performance hardware, than the average SOHO/OTS router AP. Unbound configured for resolution to root servers is much better tradeoff than going to one of the corpo's that tally your data endpoints.

As for smart-phone: Why the f'ing hell would you do ANYTHING on that device unless absolutely necessary? You should never browse the web on them. You should never use any app. You should never have any fidelity enable except cellular or that fidelity that is absolutely necessary at that time. Find other means unless you can filter, mask, and prevent. Have you ever looked at your Google timeline before you disabled tracking? Have you ever seen Google Maps suggesting and requesting information on places that you WALKED by?

These references give you an idea:


.

Much of the influence I have had was from Budo, and other philosophies concerning "security". I take this approach often for usage of technology. I laugh even when someone says UPnP is not secure (it isn't but you want to play a game on a console but do not want static holes within the firewall), but yet have no egress ACL's and filtering. I like how some are taught to think "you have a wall therefore secure from outsiders" bullshit. Like for instance how some think NAT is secure and safe: https://www.armis.com/resources/iot...all-internal-network-devices-to-the-internet/. Just sending a packet to a server and then them sending packets to other servers to send to your host is like a tsunami of security issues. It is frustrating to say the least. Like trying to inexpensively use VLAN's only to have the switch be insecure itself due to creation of the device and user ignorance. Even the "free" software such as pfSense is becoming complicated for usage as the sources are starting to close to become lucrative, and prevent our options unless it is an expense for such, and also for performance for such. I'll just leave with one quote when it comes to the internet and life itself by Helen Keller:

“Life is either a daring adventure or nothing. Security does not exist in nature, nor do the children of men as a whole experience it. Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than exposure.”​


https://discourse.pi-hole.net/t/general-consensus-to-use-cloudflare-proxy-or-unbound/19120
https://labzilla.io/blog/force-dns-pihole
(Duh) https://www.zdnet.com/article/nsa-warns-against-using-doh-inside-enterprise-networks/

pfSense (https://www.pfsense.org/):
https://docs.netgate.com/pfsense/en/latest/recipes/dns-block-external.html
https://docs.netgate.com/pfsense/en/latest/recipes/dns-redirect.html
https://protectli.com/kb/how-to-setup-pfblockerng/
https://b3n.org/hijacked-slow-dns-unbound-pfsense/
https://linuxincluded.com/block-ads-malvertising-on-pfsense-using-pfblockerng-dnsbl/

OPNsense (https://opnsense.org/):
https://www.routerperformance.net/opnsense/using-pfblocker-features-in-opnsense/

Pi-hole (https://pi-hole.net/)
Articles above as mentioned
and we have a discussion over here too: https://hardforum.com/threads/pi-hole-config-gotcha.2007202/#post-1044928195

Decent channel for configuration knowledge and help with mainly pfSense:
https://www.youtube.com/user/TheTecknowledge

If you cannot remove the router such as AT&T, Verizon FiOS TV, et al then utilize Pi-hole. Sometimes you can eliminate the provided gateway device, but YMMV.
 
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Aurelius

2[H]4U
Joined
Mar 22, 2003
Messages
3,119
Any packet of any bit (no pun intended) that traverses will be and is examined somewhere. They ALL lie, and sell your data. They all collect, gather, and become lucrative with your data and have been for a long, long, long time. If it is free, it is a lie. If it is paid for, it is still a lie when concerning data collection and selling.

As for smart-phone: Why the f'ing hell would you do ANYTHING on that device unless absolutely necessary? You should never browse the web on them. You should never use any app. You should never have any fidelity enable except cellular or that fidelity that is absolutely necessary at that time. Find other means unless you can filter, mask, and prevent. Have you ever looked at your Google timeline before you disabled tracking? Have you ever seen Google Maps suggesting and requesting information on places that you WALKED by?

I can understand wanting to have greater control over your privacy, but this is genuine paranoia. All companies lie and sell your data? No mobile web use at all? No mobile apps at all? You point to Keller's warning that "avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than exposure," yet you're doing the very thing she advised against. I refuse to deal in simplistic absolutes, to cut myself off, to pretend that putting any data online is tantamount to exposing everything. I'll happily strike a reasonable balance between privacy and convenience, and I'll enjoy watching you squirm while I do it.
 

Lumpus

Limp Gawd
Joined
Sep 2, 2005
Messages
369
>>They ALL lie, and sell your data. They all collect, gather, and become lucrative with your data and have been for a long, long, long time.

This. YOU are the product... never forget this.

Having a VPN today is darned near essential. Having NoScript + PrivacyBadger covers at least 98% of most data mining issues. DuckDuckGo is decent (but still relies to a certain extent on Google), but safer than the alternatives. I've been hearing a bit lately about the Brave browser, but I'm not ready to give up my Firefox just yet - too many semi-essential plugins I'd hate to lose.
 

Shikami

Gawd
Joined
Apr 5, 2010
Messages
767
I can understand wanting to have greater control over your privacy, but this is genuine paranoia. All companies lie and sell your data? No mobile web use at all? No mobile apps at all? You point to Keller's warning that "avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than exposure," yet you're doing the very thing she advised against. I refuse to deal in simplistic absolutes, to cut myself off, to pretend that putting any data online is tantamount to exposing everything. I'll happily strike a reasonable balance between privacy and convenience, and I'll enjoy watching you squirm while I do it.

You didn't really read the post. You thought you did but one more try, and maybe you might catch it. As for paranoia, you didn't really understand what Snowden has done and what was done to him; and what happened afterwards. Reminds me of Wash saying this:

.


Having a VPN today is darned near essential.

VPN's are bullshit. Wake up
 

Mystique

Limp Gawd
Joined
Mar 28, 2009
Messages
271
VPN's are bullshit. Wake up
What? Explain what about VPN's are bullshit. Hiding DNS resolution is one thing. You could and should go even further, and chain unbound to pihole for encrypted DNS, but hiding your traffic on a VPN is bullshit?

Maybe some are selling your data, or selling you out, but there are some out there that claim they don't. And in court that held up for those. I am just curious... without videos or memes, what you meant.
 

Delicieuxz

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
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Messages
1,240
Cloudflare voluntarily submits itself to audits to confirm its privacy claims.
https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/ne...1-dns-passes-privacy-audit-some-issues-found/

DuckDuckGo's CEO has explained their revenue model here:
https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-revenue-generation-model-for-DuckDuckGo/answer/Gabriel-Weinberg

The Big Myth

It’s actually a big myth that search engines need to track your personal search history to make money or deliver quality search results. Almost all of the money search engines make (including Google) is based on the keywords you type in, without knowing anything about you, including your search history or the seemingly endless amounts of additional data points they have collected about registered and non-registered users alike.

In fact, search advertisers buy search ads by bidding on keywords, not people. It makes intuitive sense, too. If you search for ‘car’, you are more likely to respond to a car ad than something you searched for last week.

This keyword-based advertising is our primary business model. When you search on DuckDuckGo, we can show you an ad based on the keywords you type in. That’s it. And it works. Our privacy policy, in a nutshell, is to not collect or share any personal information at all. Every time you search on DuckDuckGo it is as if you were there for the first time – anonymous.
 

Shikami

Gawd
Joined
Apr 5, 2010
Messages
767
What? Explain what about VPN's are bullshit.

This Hated One can explain it enough for others. As long as this is understood then hey, not really much of a gain:





Cloudflare voluntarily submits itself to audits to confirm its privacy claims.

Did you know that a while ago they were able to know the type of crystal installed on the motherboard and therefore most likely know the motherboard manufacturer just by the jitter tendency of NTP due to heat? There can always be information in some way or form with networking. There is data they have logged, which is wiped in 24hrs according to Cloudflare. Why is any information stored if there is transparency? What happens to that data within the 24hrs before a wipe? Who is doing the audit, BTW? Might trust them with the EFF audit. Note, this in the article: Cloudflare had also stated that all logs were wiped within 24-hours, but the audit revealed that the logs are wiped within 25 hours and some anonymized data is kept indefinitely.

There is data/metadata. There always will be in some way or form-they lie and proven as so in the article.





The Hated One is a decent channel. Some may like the input he has, especially the "paranoid" video on ultrasonic cross-device tracking:
 

Aegir

Gawd
Joined
Apr 15, 2020
Messages
559
I can understand wanting to have greater control over your privacy, but this is genuine paranoia. All companies lie and sell your data? No mobile web use at all? No mobile apps at all? You point to Keller's warning that "avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than exposure," yet you're doing the very thing she advised against. I refuse to deal in simplistic absolutes, to cut myself off, to pretend that putting any data online is tantamount to exposing everything. I'll happily strike a reasonable balance between privacy and convenience, and I'll enjoy watching you squirm while I do it.

Paranoia pays off.

Trust doesn't.

When were the paranoid ever wrong? No really, look back on cyber history and tell me that the paranoid were wrong before 2010, before those NSA revelations. Tell me the paranoid were wrong back when phreaking was a thing. Paranoia always pays off. If the conspiracy was false, you lost very little. You were simply protected from more social brainwashing, if nothing else.

If it was true, then you were protected. And face it. It's true this time. Basically, EVERY conspiracy theory is true.
Every. Single. One.

Because if it's not, then it's not like it really matters anyways. It's not like anyone's gonna do anything about it anyways.
Assume more than is sane. Assume satellites exist that can triangulate your position in real time, and show people a 3D full-color video feed of yourself in your house at all times, along with all data usage. Assume robots monitor it 24/7. Assume robots are God. Assume everything. But believe nothing.

They're always watching. /s

/s..... OR IS IT!!!!! DUN DUN DUNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
 

Aurelius

2[H]4U
Joined
Mar 22, 2003
Messages
3,119
You didn't really read the post. You thought you did but one more try, and maybe you might catch it. As for paranoia, you didn't really understand what Snowden has done and what was done to him; and what happened afterwards. Reminds me of Wash saying this:

.




VPN's are bullshit. Wake up

I did read it correctly. You still told people to do those things, and they're still irrational.

Also, I've followed Snowden's leaks and their implications for surveillance and metadata since they first broke. Extensively. I know about PRISM, and how the NSA's bulk metadata collection can infer sensitive facts from seemingly innocuous data. But I also know the limitations of what surveillance agencies can meaningfully collect and analyze... and more importantly, I know there's a certain folly to cutting yourself off from the very basics of the internet (at least the mobile internet) out of fear. At a certain point, you're not getting any practical privacy advantages while giving in to your neuroses.
 

Shikami

Gawd
Joined
Apr 5, 2010
Messages
767
To me it seems you did not for I a few things written:

We can implement some things, but in all honesty it is not only punitive due to inverse relationship of countermeasures, but also difficult with modern times in which they have manipulated us into.
We are slowly being constrained into "their ways."
The only way, the only true path, is to eliminate any usage or giving of any energy to them. In other words, like with security, the only way to be near close to secure with technology is not to use it, but that doesn't work well in modern society as I noted on how we are being constrained into their ways.

According to you those who do are paranoid if they shred data on drives, separate network domains, deny and filter third party resolution, black list IP's, DNS sink hole, control Wi-Fi transmissions, VLAN, anti-virus (that's a another subject matter, lol). Oh, wait this is corporate practice-they must be paranoid? I wonder what the government does, lol. I guess transitive association makes me paranoid too-maybe you are right??

You know when I was younger there were those that thought the government was talking in their head. People used to laugh all the time and say they were paranoid, and much of the tin foil hat replies would be spoken. But guess what the government was experimenting on "casting" vocalizations to the ear. The technology is out, and matter of fact they have speakers that can beam to the ear (https://apnews.com/article/new-tech-device-sound-beaming-noveto-38327ae5fe116080a5eaf2374eb0f5c8). Dunno, if I want that radiation but they "possibly" were right about voices in the head-go figure. Funny fact, we use a lot of spy technology right now, such as HomePlug.

You start to find out just how "living on a space ship" you are when you find out how much electromagnetic warfare has been studied and implemented by the gov't. Havana syndrome, for example, is a recent event which doesn't include the Russian embassy event of being microwaved. How about hearing your own talk (https://www.smithsonianmag.com/inno...ignals,loud using artificial voice technology.) How about listening (https://www.newscientist.com/articl...-decoder-can-eavesdrop-on-your-inner-voice/)? I do not paint my walls to prevent wireless fidelity, and a bunch of other (possibly) "paranoid" resolutions. But with my DNS control not only local caching and faster browsing, there is also the likeliness of not being compromised by the many typical vectors of attack. So, there are advantages which has been practiced for YEARS before paranoia bullshit of the many hit (host file anyone?), and only with a couple of clicks. Plenty of advantages at least for me, with clinical proof. YMMV, though.

I do somethings, but as I said we cannot control it all, and we cannot defend against it all. The inverse relationship of security is frustrating when doing so, and I actually do pick a balance. You cannot block the whole internet. Also, I like to hear, speak other languages, and meet other people when I play games. To also note, that it [security] cannot be created for it doesn't even exist, and to try is only to not experience life (the Keller quote). So, IMO, you do not understand the thoughts I wrote and are extrapolating your own conclusion which you deem under your own paradigm of security because maybe you are in denial? But hey this is text not conversation, and I am not a writer. So I get it, but no I still think you do not get it. Here is a possibly paranoid thought: You want to know why they want you to have electrical cars-mainly why? Just ask yourself first. Then here is the answer: This is so they can track you and even take your ability to travel away. Interestingly enough, that is what is happening. Get ready for it because it is coming: https://www.myorego.org/

Now, you can call me paranoid. But in all the stories of man, it was those that were madden by the gods for they were given gifts that saw into man and knew the coming. Spaceship....
 

Mystique

Limp Gawd
Joined
Mar 28, 2009
Messages
271
VPN's are not bullshit. That video was though; took a long time to get to. The whole main reason the video had (if you can call it that) given was that by using a VPN you're shifting trust from ISP to VPN. Duh. That's literally why you buy a VPN. The VPN may be presumably operated in another country with a different set of laws which has been upheld when previously sued for data in court. Its encrypted traffic stream is extremely important to some people. That's why I said explain it without a video; since it smelled like BS.

I do agree that nothing is foolproof, and you should do everything possible to cover your tracks. You be as paranoid as you want, that's your prerogative; but you don't have to have a 1 or 0 approach to get some mileage out of your data security. If you could only do protonmail and duckduckgo, you're still cutting off a lot of the most valuable data from being marketed, and the rest might be arguably concedable. But YMMV. Definitely worth a privacy checkup on all devices every now and then, to do what you can, since we don't have GDPR.

Pesonally, I've gone more steps than the above, but there's always more steps to go. It is an ever-vigilant fight, but some data vectors are clearly worse to expose than others.
 
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Aegir

Gawd
Joined
Apr 15, 2020
Messages
559
Sum sae yu cannat blok da hol enternit. Buttt wat ef yu deid?
Wite-list fai-er wals. Use masheen lerning tu identifi da saits yu actulee uus, and den blok everitheeng els.

Andd ov corse, rite fonetiklee tu priivant masheen analisis ov yur riting.
 
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Aurelius

2[H]4U
Joined
Mar 22, 2003
Messages
3,119
To me it seems you did not for I a few things written:

We can implement some things, but in all honesty it is not only punitive due to inverse relationship of countermeasures, but also difficult with modern times in which they have manipulated us into.
We are slowly being constrained into "their ways."
The only way, the only true path, is to eliminate any usage or giving of any energy to them. In other words, like with security, the only way to be near close to secure with technology is not to use it, but that doesn't work well in modern society as I noted on how we are being constrained into their ways.

According to you those who do are paranoid if they shred data on drives, separate network domains, deny and filter third party resolution, black list IP's, DNS sink hole, control Wi-Fi transmissions, VLAN, anti-virus (that's a another subject matter, lol). Oh, wait this is corporate practice-they must be paranoid? I wonder what the government does, lol. I guess transitive association makes me paranoid too-maybe you are right??

You know when I was younger there were those that thought the government was talking in their head. People used to laugh all the time and say they were paranoid, and much of the tin foil hat replies would be spoken. But guess what the government was experimenting on "casting" vocalizations to the ear. The technology is out, and matter of fact they have speakers that can beam to the ear (https://apnews.com/article/new-tech-device-sound-beaming-noveto-38327ae5fe116080a5eaf2374eb0f5c8). Dunno, if I want that radiation but they "possibly" were right about voices in the head-go figure. Funny fact, we use a lot of spy technology right now, such as HomePlug.

You start to find out just how "living on a space ship" you are when you find out how much electromagnetic warfare has been studied and implemented by the gov't. Havana syndrome, for example, is a recent event which doesn't include the Russian embassy event of being microwaved. How about hearing your own talk (https://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/device-can-hear-voice-inside-your-head-180972785/#:~:text=The device feeds the signals,loud using artificial voice technology.) How about listening (https://www.newscientist.com/articl...-decoder-can-eavesdrop-on-your-inner-voice/)? I do not paint my walls to prevent wireless fidelity, and a bunch of other (possibly) "paranoid" resolutions. But with my DNS control not only local caching and faster browsing, there is also the likeliness of not being compromised by the many typical vectors of attack. So, there are advantages which has been practiced for YEARS before paranoia bullshit of the many hit (host file anyone?), and only with a couple of clicks. Plenty of advantages at least for me, with clinical proof. YMMV, though.

I do somethings, but as I said we cannot control it all, and we cannot defend against it all. The inverse relationship of security is frustrating when doing so, and I actually do pick a balance. You cannot block the whole internet. Also, I like to hear, speak other languages, and meet other people when I play games. To also note, that it [security] cannot be created for it doesn't even exist, and to try is only to not experience life (the Keller quote). So, IMO, you do not understand the thoughts I wrote and are extrapolating your own conclusion which you deem under your own paradigm of security because maybe you are in denial? But hey this is text not conversation, and I am not a writer. So I get it, but no I still think you do not get it. Here is a possibly paranoid thought: You want to know why they want you to have electrical cars-mainly why? Just ask yourself first. Then here is the answer: This is so they can track you and even take your ability to travel away. Interestingly enough, that is what is happening. Get ready for it because it is coming: https://www.myorego.org/

Now, you can call me paranoid. But in all the stories of man, it was those that were madden by the gods for they were given gifts that saw into man and knew the coming. Spaceship....

Nah, based on this post it's clearer than ever I read things correctly.

I love how you claim you're not paranoid but then go on to treat scientific experiments on voice casting and brain decoding as if they're being widely used, or that EVs exist as a sinister control mechanism to stifle the ability to travel. Combine that with the absolutist stance on phone data and there's a pretty clear pattern emerging. The strange thing is that no one compelled you to go this route; you brought up the mind spying and EV conspiracy angles yourself.

There are good reasons to be mindful of your privacy, to use VPNs, limit tracking cookies, be picky about the apps you use...but there's also a practical limit to that. When it gets to the point where you're curtailing basic online activity, where you're convinced the slightest compromise will ruin any attempt of privacy, you've gone too far.

I'm reminded a bit of Richard Stallman. He claims he's free, but his absolutism and paranoia have ironically made him one of the most limited, trapped computer users on the planet. He uses decrepit computing hardware (to ensure it's true FOSS); he refuses to use much of the modern internet, not just social networks. I see similar things emerging here — you're so afraid that someone might see your data that you can't actually do much. If you were in Tunisia during the Arab Spring, you wouldn't even know people were mobilizing to obtain real, meaningful freedom because you'd be terrified of the social networks they frequently used to coordinate.
 

Shikami

Gawd
Joined
Apr 5, 2010
Messages
767
VPN's are not bullshit.

True not entirely all bullshit, but for the majority of it yes it is bullshit. Encrypted traffic is the default now with most to all traffic. Some cypher's can be brute force easily even possibly with an integrated GPU, lol. L2TP was made insecure long ago, and mainly removed from many capable sources including pfSense to name one. Even passwords, as useless as they are, have to many more characters now just due to brute force. As it said in the video, it isn't 2004 anymore. A lot of "the thought as protective mechanisms" are not really that protective anymore. Logs, IP masking, hidden whatever, and whatever are just marketing ploys and do not mean much at all. They know what you are doing, such as the Firestick TV seller's and modder's thought it was all safe with their VPN's till they came for them. Sure, I would have a VPN that is NAT to an ephemeral port if I wanted to do X, Y, and Z on my personal network. But most of the end user VPN usage that is thought as necessary is not anything special. It is mainly for most to passthrough regional walls, GDPR, and whatever. Except for China you have to use their VPN tech. So yeah, control networking domains in a insecure network, broadcasting control, cookie snooping, web sniffing, and such...sure as long as no DNS leak.

The shifting from ISP to VPN provider. I think you missed the reference in which of the masking of pertinent OSI layer, and how it doesn't. It is still the same principal but shifting one possible trust to another possible trust. Is it that much trust worthy, basically? Mainly a false sense of security. However, since most traffic is encrypted and through supposedly trusted certs there is only a little areas of concern and that is the DNS lookups and traffic source/dest. Even with the Favicons vulnerability, VPN doesn't provide one bit of help to due to very nature and function of HTML and the underlying workings. You cannot escape OSI functionality-at the very core it is insecure as all communication is. Ben Franklin - Three can keep a secret, if two are dead.
 

Shikami

Gawd
Joined
Apr 5, 2010
Messages
767
I love how you claim you're not paranoid but then go on to treat scientific experiments on voice casting and brain decoding as if they're being widely used, or that EVs exist as a sinister control mechanism to stifle the ability to travel. Combine that with the absolutist stance on phone data and there's a pretty clear pattern emerging. The strange thing is that no one compelled you to go this route; you brought up the mind spying and EV conspiracy angles yourself.

Just because one says that it doesn't exist, doesn't mean that it does not. I still recall at a doctor's office the epitaph I read: "Told you something was wrong." These are examples of the scientific in which all seemed like paranoia. Consideration has to be taken into account. Very similar to how lead gas in the 70's when all the children were becoming mental incompetent. It is good, and for your benefit said the paid scientific goats of the corp's when question under a congressional hearing concerning lead in gasoline. But one scientist finally had the ice samples and irrefutable evidence of the pattern, and he was correct. Unleaded refined gas resolved the problem. This is not a pattern this is me skeptical and the determination to consider the devil's advocate argument. If this exist then by transitive association so does a lot.

Exactly, the Stallman comparison is exactly what I mean too. You cannot be afraid, and not use technology. The security paradigm imprisons you, and why I meant what Keller said. There is not more control that can be exerted, but some should even with the inverse relationship of the difficulty of use to more secure. You pick the balance, but also need the right tools worth the balance.

The Tunisia reference. Recall, Black Hawk Down? When the helo's flew over and the little kid was a mobile LP (listening post). Made a cell phone call and all was alerted. A true defeat to countermeasures and NEO (nap of the earth). Or how about one of my favorite one to mention, the steering wheel lock popular in the 80's. This one GTA kid said those were his favorite due to the fact that the people didn't understand that a saw and a little time is all that was needed to saw, and remove the bar to steal the car. He said he loved to surprise them to a stolen car the most.
 

Mystique

Limp Gawd
Joined
Mar 28, 2009
Messages
271
VPN doesn't provide one bit of help to due to very nature and function of HTML and the underlying workings.
What if you're not even using HTML? Many people use VPN for traffic that isn't web traffic only.

WireGuard and OpenVPN implementations are already using currently unbreakable encryption.

It may not be the best for some people's desired use case, but for others, it's perfect.
 

Aegir

Gawd
Joined
Apr 15, 2020
Messages
559
What if you're not even using HTML? Many people use VPN for traffic that isn't web traffic only.

WireGuard and OpenVPN implementations are already using currently unbreakable encryption.

It may not be the best for some people's desired use case, but for others, it's perfect.

If you believe that any encryption you might use is unbreakable, then let me remind you that encryption is classified as military armaments.
And the good stuff is NOT for you.
 

Mystique

Limp Gawd
Joined
Mar 28, 2009
Messages
271
If you believe that any encryption you might use is unbreakable, then let me remind you that encryption is classified as military armaments.
And the good stuff is NOT for you.
Find one source that has broken AES-256? Any cipher can't be "proven to be secure" but it also hasn't been proven to be broken in this case. You do have to walk outside and live your life, so you make the best with what you got.
 

Aegir

Gawd
Joined
Apr 15, 2020
Messages
559
Find one source that has broken AES-256? Any cipher can't be "proven to be secure" but it also hasn't been proven to be broken in this case. You do have to walk outside and live your life, so you make the best with what you got.

The sorts of powerful sources that can break or create backdoors in AES-256 are not likely to tell you that it is broken.

We can only hope.
 

mouacyk

Weaksauce
Joined
Dec 5, 2015
Messages
110
I don't get Americans and their pretense of privacy. All one can do in a modern connected society is limit your interactions with such a network, provided one has already done all one can to keep the network away from oneself. Obfuscation and encryption are just attempts to win real-time privacy -- because if someone is interested, they'll crack it eventually.
 

Aegir

Gawd
Joined
Apr 15, 2020
Messages
559
I don't get Americans and their pretense of privacy. All one can do in a modern connected society is limit your interactions with such a network, provided one has already done all one can to keep the network away from oneself. Obfuscation and encryption are just attempts to win real-time privacy -- because if someone is interested, they'll crack it eventually.

The funny part is that the more work you go to to hide yourself, the more you'll look like you have something to hide.

The simple truth is that we should have an expectation of privacy, and it should be absolutely forbidden to gather our information or spy on our communications.
Forbidden for corporations, forbidden for governments.

We should be secure.
 

Shikami

Gawd
Joined
Apr 5, 2010
Messages
767
Now the conversations are getting interesting!

What if you're not even using HTML? Many people use VPN for traffic that isn't web traffic only.

WireGuard and OpenVPN implementations are already using currently unbreakable encryption.

It may not be the best for some people's desired use case, but for others, it's perfect.

I get it and I noted that. But for the most part VPN is nothing but bullshit for the typical end user that was trying to prevent X that was in advert X. Most privacy "concerns" are encapsulated within the TX'ing protocols now. If you are using VPN just to shop Amazon, duh. If you are using VPN to get past wall'z, YMMV. But for, I guess to say some of us, it is used properly like VLAN's. Most are just wasting money by being preyed on their ignorance of the protocols.

"unbreakable encryption"
I always crack up at this. Windows 10 is more secure than Windows 7, pffff. Then why are their security updates all the time? Do you not recall the inverse relationships with arithmetic? If it is encrypted then it can be decrypted. Everything to decrypt the cypher is entirely a variable. However, as one pointed really well-encryption can be bypassed! Oh, one good example of the inverse is also Masada.

As pointed out, usually how all compromise occurs is elsewhere. Just because you block a strike doesn't mean that the strike was ineffective (speaking of compromise, not rebuttals). Note, my NAT slipstream security bit previously. Many think NAT is security when it has nothing to do with it. It has an inadvertent affect on TCP/IP. The intrinsic qualities of networking are very particular, and working at that level is what causes compromises, and is similar to the old phreaking days. Whistle and you have a free long distance phone call. When I was talking with a co-worker about conditioning they felt I was not logical with the argument. I spoke their name and they replied. Then I smiled at them-hacking 101 (not social engineering, an example of integrated protocols social or technical). SYN cookies anyone?





I don't get Americans and their pretense of privacy. All one can do in a modern connected society is limit your interactions with such a network, provided one has already done all one can to keep the network away from oneself. Obfuscation and encryption are just attempts to win real-time privacy -- because if someone is interested, they'll crack it eventually.

How true, yes. Privacy is an integral mechanism(s). Let's talk about your relationships and the honesty you may, or may not have. Did you happen to lie recently about an outfit a coworker, relative, or significant other wore when asked what you thought about it? Hmn, uhm, hmn. As I mentioned before, if privacy, in most times, wasn't an issue we would be exposing our data on an old hard drive, not shredding documents of "important" personal information, et al. Privacy, in some aspects is absolutely necessary, but also it isn't anyone else business what I do-not even the fucking gov't. How about those that posted on social media that they were not home and on vacation only to be robbed, by family even! Geo-tagging and sexual predators anyone? The ability to express is very integral, however we cannot always do so for various reasons. When we can that's when we feel the most human and true to our nature. The generalization of privacy and how the many cannot comprehend the importance of it is astounding (technical or social). Japanese proverb: The first face, you show to the world. The second face, you show to your close friends, and your family. The third face, you never show anyone.” Hello, Nature meet Demeanor....






The funny part is that the more work you go to to hide yourself, the more you'll look like you have something to hide.


Ah, trying to be the grey man. This is incorrectly thought about. The issue(s) anywhere now is they can label you and all rights are stripped because of such. I mentioned Snowden previously. They label you a terrorist and *poof* what is the 4thA? Pretty much most of that does not exist now, the 4th that is. A good example is TSA. How about Real-ID in the USA? Not to mention, ANYTHING can be made up about you-deep fakes. You never grew up with the TV shows and movies of the the character running from a "crime he didn't commit"? Grizzly Adams, anyone? A good example is the Crucible. Say they accuse you of trafficking with the devil and everything was stripped from you. You had two choices, repent and die (usually) or die a blasphemer. This was mainly due to property, BTW. Oh, kind of what is happening now with the riots and shit. Wake up!







Security and privacy these are going to fluctuate in concepts for networking. Paradigms will change and many of those bubbles will pop-to hopefully a better one. It is obvious that it is a concern, because look at everything now. It is a reaction to, rather than a preventative plan that should have been implemented LONG, LONG, LOOOOONG ago.
 

DukenukemX

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Jan 30, 2005
Messages
5,289
I don't get Americans and their pretense of privacy. All one can do in a modern connected society is limit your interactions with such a network, provided one has already done all one can to keep the network away from oneself. Obfuscation and encryption are just attempts to win real-time privacy -- because if someone is interested, they'll crack it eventually.
Yep, that's why most experts will abstain from anything they feel they don't have total control. If you don't like Google spying on you then stop using Google services. If you don't like Microsoft spying on you then stop using Microsoft products. While I'm all for VPN's, it's not the best method to prevent spying. Unless you live in a cabin in the woods and have no communication with the world, they are tracking you.
 

mouacyk

Weaksauce
Joined
Dec 5, 2015
Messages
110
Yep, that's why most experts will abstain from anything they feel they don't have total control. If you don't like Google spying on you then stop using Google services. If you don't like Microsoft spying on you then stop using Microsoft products. While I'm all for VPN's, it's not the best method to prevent spying. Unless you live in a cabin in the woods and have no communication with the world, they are tracking you.
Even then, they've got AI that will track you with satellite thermal imaging if you are really worth their attention.
 

AVATARAT

Limp Gawd
Joined
Jun 16, 2020
Messages
147
Very interesting topic.

If you don't want anyone to know anything about you - go and live in a cave :D

Now serious.
The main problem is not what they can know about our privacy but what we watch on TV/Web.
Because they made this content to control us through us.

And yes hide everything you can hide.
 

Aurelius

2[H]4U
Joined
Mar 22, 2003
Messages
3,119
Just because one says that it doesn't exist, doesn't mean that it does not. I still recall at a doctor's office the epitaph I read: "Told you something was wrong." These are examples of the scientific in which all seemed like paranoia. Consideration has to be taken into account. Very similar to how lead gas in the 70's when all the children were becoming mental incompetent. It is good, and for your benefit said the paid scientific goats of the corp's when question under a congressional hearing concerning lead in gasoline. But one scientist finally had the ice samples and irrefutable evidence of the pattern, and he was correct. Unleaded refined gas resolved the problem. This is not a pattern this is me skeptical and the determination to consider the devil's advocate argument. If this exist then by transitive association so does a lot.
Focusing on this.

Here's the thing: if you're going to declare that something is happening in a certain way, you have to show that it's happening in that way. You don't make the logical leap from "they experimented with mind invasion for a while" to "assume they're using it right now." Clair Patterson didn't simply assume that leaded gasoline was causing broad health issues, and work backward to prove it; he came to that conclusion after he noticed something odd (lead contamination skewing his results) and conducted research to determine what the cause might be, wherever the data took him. Patterson didn't play devil's advocate, he relied solely on evidence... and frankly, he'd be disappointed in you.

This is what's frustrating about extreme approaches to internet privacy: it's based on a leap of logic, on a small grain of truth distorted to feed preconceived fears and anxieties. It's easier to claim "everyone is spying on everything you do online" than to accept a nuanced reality where there are some privacy issues worth your concern, others that aren't, and that balance means a reasonable balance — not "don't use any apps on your phone." That's just simplistic, irrational fear wrapped up in a thin veil of claimed legitimacy.
 

Shikami

Gawd
Joined
Apr 5, 2010
Messages
767
You don't make the logical leap from "they experimented with mind invasion for a while"

I am not hear to write a thesis to explain for your very own benefit, you need to come to your own conclusions. But here's a quarter: MK Ultra - it was more than LSD experiments, way more. How about operation Ocean Spray?


he'd be disappointed in you.

You are extrapolating whatever you want to nit pick and are not putting things into the connective logics. Put everything together first from top to the bottom of these posts. I am talking more about the goat scientists, that said relax everything is fine. As how most things are from companies and such. "We are transparent and do not lie." Pfff, that means you lie. If you didn't it lie all would just be transparent and the people would know, and would show in tests easily. Even in the rebuttals here in the forum, there was defense to Cloudflare, and in the article it said 25Hrs, and some data retention-they lie! Yet, others defended them, lol.

Like when Tohoku earthquake of 2011 happened. I love the Japanese culture, but even their gov't officials will do shit, and how they said "everything was fine" with Fukushima. I was on the phone talking with my mother and she mentioned that the gov't posted a statement saying X, Y, Z not wot worry. I mentioned that is not good when the gov't says that-then pop it happened, it blew. Back to Patterson, note I didn't mention his name due to the fact he was not the subject. He had evidence, just as you mention-read the statement again (But one scientist finally had the ice samples and irrefutable evidence of the pattern, and he was correct.) Yeah, keep on listening to those paid individuals from the gas companies, or the one that host DNS services. My favorite, the food corporations and how they LIE to you about health. Fat and sugar some of the biggest bullshit health conditioning I have every seen, and how so many followed that bullshit. The "people in power" want the scientific community (and other in appointed offices, positions, whatever pedestal they give them) to be listened to. What makes them so special? The point of science is not to be conditioned to listen to others. YOU ARE YOUR BEST ADVICATE, and you look for others to help guide in making better decisions.



It's easier to claim "everyone is spying on everything you do online"

To claim!? Are you kidding me!? There is no claim the evidence: IS ALL OVER THE PLACE! With, opt-outs, masked ID's, masked MAC's, letters of your "rights", "what you can do about your privacy, et al. ARE YOU KIDDING ME? I am laughing so loud. See how you are conditioned to DEFEND THEM? You cannot think logically with out attacking ("and frankly, he'd be disappointed in you"), as you have done, to defend them. Rather than try to scientifically prove the counterpart. Wake up! Free your mind, and your ass will follow.
 

Aurelius

2[H]4U
Joined
Mar 22, 2003
Messages
3,119
I am not hear to write a thesis to explain for your very own benefit, you need to come to your own conclusions. But here's a quarter: MK Ultra - it was more than LSD experiments, way more. How about operation Ocean Spray?




You are extrapolating whatever you want to nit pick and are not putting things into the connective logics. Put everything together first from top to the bottom of these posts. I am talking more about the goat scientists, that said relax everything is fine. As how most things are from companies and such. "We are transparent and do not lie." Pfff, that means you lie. If you didn't it lie all would just be transparent and the people would know, and would show in tests easily. Even in the rebuttals here in the forum, there was defense to Cloudflare, and in the article it said 25Hrs, and some data retention-they lie! Yet, others defended them, lol.

Like when Tohoku earthquake of 2011 happened. I love the Japanese culture, but even their gov't officials will do shit, and how they said "everything was fine" with Fukushima. I was on the phone talking with my mother and she mentioned that the gov't posted a statement saying X, Y, Z not wot worry. I mentioned that is not good when the gov't says that-then pop it happened, it blew. Back to Patterson, note I didn't mention his name due to the fact he was not the subject. He had evidence, just as you mention-read the statement again (But one scientist finally had the ice samples and irrefutable evidence of the pattern, and he was correct.) Yeah, keep on listening to those paid individuals from the gas companies, or the one that host DNS services. My favorite, the food corporations and how they LIE to you about health. Fat and sugar some of the biggest bullshit health conditioning I have every seen, and how so many followed that bullshit. The "people in power" want the scientific community (and other in appointed offices, positions, whatever pedestal they give them) to be listened to. What makes them so special? The point of science is not to be conditioned to listen to others. YOU ARE YOUR BEST ADVICATE, and you look for others to help guide in making better decisions.





To claim!? Are you kidding me!? There is no claim the evidence: IS ALL OVER THE PLACE! With, opt-outs, masked ID's, masked MAC's, letters of your "rights", "what you can do about your privacy, et al. ARE YOU KIDDING ME? I am laughing so loud. See how you are conditioned to DEFEND THEM? You cannot think logically with out attacking ("and frankly, he'd be disappointed in you"), as you have done, to defend them. Rather than try to scientifically prove the counterpart. Wake up! Free your mind, and your ass will follow.

Merely claiming the evidence is "all over the place" is not good enough. Simplistic people make broad generalizations to avoid dealing with complexity and justify their irrational views; realistic people accept that life isn't that simple... and if they have a point to make, argue it specifically and clearly without making logical leaps, as you do. To go back to Patterson again: he didn't discover that something was off about lead, shout "oil companies are hiding the truth!" and then try to find evidence to support his views... he patiently gathered a complete set of evidence and constructed an argument he could defend on every level. You're the one skipping steps and making assumptions.

I'm not defending privacy overreaches. That's an intentional, malicious generalization on your part. What I am saying is that reality is considerably more complex than you pretend it is, and that you have to approach each provider or product on its own merits rather than assuming the worst (again, as you do). That it's okay to make compromises if you understand the privacy implications.

I also see counterculture posturing where you assume that anyone who doesn't make blanket criticisms of the establishment is explicitly supporting the establishment... that's just not true. It's good to question authority, but questioning authority only works when the claims hold up under scrutiny. For example, it's good to ask if the scientific consensus on climate change is accurate, but that doesn't mean that climate change deniers have legitimate gripes. And I'm sorry, but overbroad claims like "never use apps on your phone" don't hold up under any significant amount of pressure.
 

Shikami

Gawd
Joined
Apr 5, 2010
Messages
767
Merely claiming the evidence is "all over the place" is not good enough.

It is on your phone, it was a letter possibly with a mortgage or lease, it was with your driver install (telemetry) or in your OS install. Dude, you are just not seeing the trees/forest-it is okay if you don't.


To go back to Patterson again

I remember the lead paint issue(s) very well. However, what many do not know is how this (along with many other issues we had in the timeline) even branched from the wallpaper arsenic and lead poisonings from toys to gasoline. You want to know an interesting fact? The cartoons of old when they used to make that sick green face and grey tongue? That was an actual face of lead poisoning. Now about Patterson, although you are using him as a comparison, once again I am talking about those that are "here to help and advise." You know, the ones that always lie, or just fuckin don't care because of profit.

This has been one of the most wisest things I have read in a long time. When informing those for a "greater benefit" by breaking the "programming". Linus TT has a video, and he mentions this: "The truth of the matter is that to basically any company beholden to its shareholders, you are nothing more than a living wallet on legs. If you imagine it any other way, then congratulations, you played yourself." This is the point that I use throughout the posts. Patterson was coincidental. Funny how you never mention about the corpo's that dried up his funds, and even try to buy out his research. Hmn, I wonder why? This is what I am talking about. Do you think Intel really gave a shit about security-many pointed this out is the OSS community? If they did we would not have had the Meltdown/Spectre bullshit, and ME. They do not care at all, q.v. Pentium. Man that pissed me off back then, and their fix "deal with it." That is all they want you to do. You get sick, deal with it. You die, or family member dies-deal with it. But yea, they were holding the truth of the matter from the people. Again you are not focusing on the "lead is good for you."



I'm not defending privacy overreaches.

You think you are not. Look at the paragraph above the sentence. Your language used would differ (Quantum Psychology by Robert Anton Wilson).



I also see counterculture posturing where you assume that anyone who doesn't make blanket criticisms of the establishment is explicitly supporting the establishment

Everything contains its exact opposite. The nomenclature is nothing but a deconstruction mechanism to mitigate the possibility of any reaction of the people; and they [blanket term] fear the people as you would because you cannot contain a mob. Rhetorical-Why is there such propaganda with the news when it comes to many of the "modern terms used now" in broadcasting? I think Newt's dialog in Aliens sums it up perfectly, and to be followed by then the scene of who is the real monster. Pay close attention to that if you never gave it the attention it should have had.



And I'm sorry, but overbroad claims like "never use apps on your phone" don't hold up under any significant amount of pressure.

That is your paradigm. Doesn't matter to me if you really want that app to order Chik-Fil-A or whatever. But the evidence is there on what those apps do, and have been reported multiple times. What? You never set a restriction of access with your phone, and asked yourself why does this have to happen? Forest and trees, man. But like said, your bubble, your linguistic relativity. Wake up....or not





Articles like this crack me up:

https://www.theregister.com/2021/02/12/footfallcam_twitter_kerfuffle/ More links and discussion on other forum: https://www.dslreports.com/forum/r33032152-IoT-firm-apologises-promises-fixes-after-backlash

https://www.cnet.com/news/adt-home-...to-spying-on-customer-camera-feeds-for-years/ (You should never post the sign too. Why the f'ing hell would you give a blueprint on the security measures used? So assinine)


This is what needs to be "countered", and my point(s) to it all.



Edit: Here is a recent article in which Apple, claims privacy issue and denies privacy issue from Gmail...although being added, but doesn't commit so as not to be held accountable. I liked one of the comments: "Hmm. What’s “other data”. Sounds creepy." The irony is that they track too, lol: https://www.macrumors.com/2021/02/22/google-gmail-app-privacy-labels/
 
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painintheworld

Limp Gawd
Joined
Jun 5, 2007
Messages
132
In regards to VPNs, could you guys advise the "best" one? I've been using Mullvad for a longgg time (I don't recall why, exactly).
 

Krenum

Fully [H]
Joined
Apr 29, 2005
Messages
17,239
In regards to VPNs, could you guys advise the "best" one? I've been using Mullvad for a longgg time (I don't recall why, exactly).
I hear ProtonVPN is good. I have a friend that uses it and swears by it. He's very tech savy, especially using networks.They also have an email service, which was created by a person at MIT.

NordVPN I guess would be most popular.
 

t1337duder

Limp Gawd
Joined
Sep 7, 2014
Messages
149
Too little, too late, no? It's hard for me to care anymore about quibbles of privacy at the point. The internet is a tool for social engineering and primarily against my existence. If it was genuinely to my benefit, I likely wouldn't long have access to it. The internet will never be "free". Your data will be harvested for profit and research as long as it exists. Complaining about privacy rights is like begging for bread crumbs at the dinner table. It's like asking your alpha prison mate to use a condom before he bends you over.

This tech oligarchy situation is so far-gone, that nothing short of a "hard reset" as well as a "firmware update" of our modern era can fix it. Day by day it's looking like The Matrix wasn't just an action movie, but more of a prophecy. I can't help but wonder how long Western society can stay the path before looking to Uncle Ted.
 
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