Why doesn't Microsoft want people to create local accounts?

Mazzspeed

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I'll clarify. It improves in the same way that a hobbyist creation improves. For the people working on it, I'm sure it has grown leaps and bounds towards what they specifically want. As a user that wants to get work done, it hasn't really improved at all despite loads of new features. The focus isn't on user experience, it's on the power user experience. This is a succinct summary of the problem: https://xkcd.com/619/

If you combined the focus on ease of use and user experience that Apple has together with the commitment to FOSS that would probably be ideal. Anyway, this is derailing the thread so I'll stop.

This sounds like "it's not a perfect Windows clone, so it's not practical", which is more than a bit of a cop out argument. If Linux was a perfect WIndows clone, I wouldn't use it. Do you have any idea how many different ways there is to install and uninstall software under MacOS? It's actually not that dissimilar to Linux in that regard. Furthermore, anything beyond the basics under MacOS requires the use of terminal which has now been complicated even more with the dropping of bash.

Muscle memory is a powerful bias.
 

ManofGod

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What?! This makes no sense.



Wouldn't that be more of a gullibility issue as opposed to a browser choice? Rupert Murdoch is every bit as bad, if not worse. I'm not at all interested in discussing politics of all things, but the fact is: In terms of privacy, Firefox is one of the best browsers out there.

But, if others want to use something else, don't let me stop you as I really don't care.

Welp, I do not trust the so called "privacy" of any Mozilla product, anymore. A person at the top who indicates..... also indicates that privacy is no longer important to them. Oh well, I have switched and will not be back, on my phone nor personal machines.
 

ManofGod

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This sounds like "it's not a perfect Windows clone, so it's not practical", which is more than a bit of a cop out argument. If Linux was a perfect WIndows clone, I wouldn't use it. Do you have any idea how many different ways there is to install and uninstall software under MacOS? It's actually not that dissimilar to Linux in that regard. Furthermore, anything beyond the basics under MacOS requires the use of terminal which has now been complicated even more with the dropping of bash.

Muscle memory is a powerful bias.

True true. I like Windows 10 and it is stable for me well I am using it. I have no issue using the Microsoft account to login, from a practical standpoint, since I have games I can install from the XBox store. However, with everything going on, privacy and security became more important to me and I have decided to move over and eliminate things like Mozilla and stuff from my personal machines.

The Microsoft account is what it is but, I have to wonder if they really care or are just do not care and therefore, it is just working the way it does, just because.
 

B00nie

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That's what I like about MacOS, it's so much like linux under the bonnet.
 

Executioner

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Here is a good write up on the Dissenter browser and how it got started. I used to enjoy viewing comments on Yahoo news, but they have killed the comment section last year, so now it's no worthwhile to even visit Yahoo anymore. Then all the other big tech places started to sensor different view points. This browser allows you to enter comments on anything you see on the web. They have an example of a youtube page. https://blokt.com/guides/dissenter-review
 

SuperSubZero

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That's what I like about MacOS, it's so much like linux under the bonnet.
You mean that part about when the Big Sur update servers went down, and people discovered that even pre-Big Sur OS's couldn't reliably run apps because users found out *right there* that anytime a third-party app is ran at all, it has to phone home to Apple first to verify the signature? And when that infrastructure took a dive, apps just wouldn't run or loaded slowly?

I wasn't aware linux did that.
 

vick1000

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Here is a good write up on the Dissenter browser and how it got started. I used to enjoy viewing comments on Yahoo news, but they have killed the comment section last year, so now it's no worthwhile to even visit Yahoo anymore. Then all the other big tech places started to sensor different view points. This browser allows you to enter comments on anything you see on the web. They have an example of a youtube page. https://blokt.com/guides/dissenter-review
Yeah, it's funny how much we ragged on Yahoo articles and their "journalists" that wrote them. They could not take the criticism, so they probably lost 90% of their visitors to escape it. Their staff was/is so blatantly biased, every article literally had me going... WTF. The mainstream will not be satisfied until they exist completely in an echo chamber, which defeats the purpose of free speach.
 

Shoganai

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You mean that part about when the Big Sur update servers went down, and people discovered that even pre-Big Sur OS's couldn't reliably run apps because users found out *right there* that anytime a third-party app is ran at all, it has to phone home to Apple first to verify the signature? And when that infrastructure took a dive, apps just wouldn't run or loaded slowly?

I wasn't aware linux did that.
Yeah I'm done with Apple. I had to downgrade back to Catalina because half my apps broke, such as several Adobe products that I use for work. And there's been a bug keeping Parallels from connecting to the network, which I also use for work. Every year macOS is more locked down than the previous year and breaks more things. It's getting old.
 

B00nie

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You mean that part about when the Big Sur update servers went down, and people discovered that even pre-Big Sur OS's couldn't reliably run apps because users found out *right there* that anytime a third-party app is ran at all, it has to phone home to Apple first to verify the signature? And when that infrastructure took a dive, apps just wouldn't run or loaded slowly?

I wasn't aware linux did that.
Nice troll. No, I meant the underlying file system structure, the ability to use unix-like tools from terminal like in linux and stuff like that. I don't need PuTTy to ssh to a server, I just do it from the terminal like in linux.

Apple has certainly taken a nosedive in software quality since the passing of Steve Jobs.

The signature verification is actually a good security feature that stops hacked or illegally modified executables from working. The way it's implemented is very bad though.
 

SuperSubZero

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Nice troll. No, I meant the underlying file system structure, the ability to use unix-like tools from terminal like in linux and stuff like that. I don't need PuTTy to ssh to a server, I just do it from the terminal like in linux.

Apple has certainly taken a nosedive in software quality since the passing of Steve Jobs.
macOS uses unix-like tools because uh.. it's partially derived from BSD. So yeah, it's a unix-like. Not sure why anyone would be surprised, it's been like that for over 20 years.

As for APFS, aside from handling macOS, it's.. a filesystem for a unix-like. I don't know what linux filesystem it can be directly compared to.


OP: you can lock this hopelessly derailed thread anytime.
 

B00nie

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macOS uses unix-like tools because uh.. it's partially derived from BSD. So yeah, it's a unix-like. Not sure why anyone would be surprised, it's been like that for over 20 years.

As for APFS, aside from handling macOS, it's.. a filesystem for a unix-like. I don't know what linux filesystem it can be directly compared to.


OP: you can lock this hopelessly derailed thread anytime.
What makes you think anyone would be surprised? It seems you chose to take a hostile stance and now just find things to pick on. Classy.
If you would bother to read what I wrote, I was talking about the file system structure, not the actual file system which is obviously different.
 

B00nie

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Yeah I'm done with Apple. I had to downgrade back to Catalina because half my apps broke, such as several Adobe products that I use for work. And there's been a bug keeping Parallels from connecting to the network, which I also use for work. Every year macOS is more locked down than the previous year and breaks more things. It's getting old.
This has always been annoying with every major OS upgrade. But then again it has enabled OSX to evolve due to not carrying all the load of backwards compatibility. It's the choice of the software vendors to not update their products for the new OS version. Some do, some don't and you may have to repurchase or do a paid upgrade.
 

Mazzspeed

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macOS uses unix-like tools because uh.. it's partially derived from BSD. So yeah, it's a unix-like. Not sure why anyone would be surprised, it's been like that for over 20 years.

As for APFS, aside from handling macOS, it's.. a filesystem for a unix-like. I don't know what linux filesystem it can be directly compared to.


OP: you can lock this hopelessly derailed thread anytime.

Actually, technically Apple pay the Open Group for Unix certification, there isn't much BSD left. Linux is more like Unix, they just don't pay the Open Group for Unix certification. Furthermore, APFS has it's share of issues, especially on mechanical HDD's (Apple supply 5400RPM spinners on many of their 21.5" iMac models).
 

3dprophet

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What?! This makes no sense.



Wouldn't that be more of a gullibility issue as opposed to a browser choice? Rupert Murdoch is every bit as bad, if not worse. I'm not at all interested in discussing politics of all things, but the fact is: In terms of privacy, Firefox is one of the best browsers out there.

But, if others want to use something else, don't let me stop you as I really don't care.

For a second I though there was something serious going on at Mozilla like a data breach or illicit activities.

Then I checked that link that was posted and I realized there is nothing to worry about. :)
 

ManofGod

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What?! This makes no sense.



Wouldn't that be more of a gullibility issue as opposed to a browser choice? Rupert Murdoch is every bit as bad, if not worse. I'm not at all interested in discussing politics of all things, but the fact is: In terms of privacy, Firefox is one of the best browsers out there.

But, if others want to use something else, don't let me stop you as I really don't care.

Feel free to trust them if you want but I do not see any evidence that they have earned that trust or mine, at least.
 
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ManofGod

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For a second I though there was something serious going on at Mozilla like a data breach or illicit activities.

Then I checked that link that was posted and I realized there is nothing to worry about. :)

If you choose to continue to trust them, that is entirely on you. I personally see no reason to since they have not earned my trust.
 

Mazzspeed

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Feel free to trust them if you want but I do not see any evidence that they have earned that trust or mine, at least.

I see no evidence any browser has earned anyone's trust, all I see is Mozilla desperately trying to find a business model that doesn't treat users as data cows by milking them for advertising. In retrospect, some of their efforts didn't succeed in this regard - But, essentially, it's all about survival in a greed driven society.

The latest version 85 release of Firefox even blocks local 'supercookies' https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/85.0/releasenotes/

Considering the performance of Firefox, combined with it's butter smooth scrolling and privacy features, I love it as a browser. I will say, however, that it's refreshing to see you've woken up to the importance of privacy and ownership.
 
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