Which CPU for Windows Home Server box?

Towermax

Limp Gawd
Joined
Oct 30, 2006
Messages
196
I'm running WHS version 1 on a home-built system using an old Socket 939 board with an Athlon X2 3800. The system is only used for file storage and automatic back-ups of five desktops and laptops. No media storage or streaming, etc.

I was going through some old components yesterday and came across two 939 Opterons--a single core 144 and an X2 165.

Which of the three CPUs do you think is best for WHS? I'm leaning toward the Opteron 144, because it seems powerful enough for my usage, and would save a bit of energy, etc. What do you think?
 

Dangman

Ninja Editor SuperMod
Joined
Dec 15, 2005
Messages
46,062
Any of those will be fine. I'm using a Celeron D 356 for my WHS v1.1 server which has been enough power.
 

saedrin

2[H]4U
Joined
Jan 5, 2009
Messages
2,104
If all it does is serve files and swap data around the local drives it won't matter. My home server ran perfectly on a P4 3.8, and later on a Pentium D 805. Eventually I moved to a Q6600 system as the Pentium D didn't have enough performance to run a minecraft server. :p
 

Cheatdeath

n00b
Joined
Mar 17, 2012
Messages
42
Im curious what processor to use for WHS 2011, I want to stream 1080p video without a problem. I want to use a consumer non sever chip. Can the i3 T series do this at 35w or will there be a need for the 65w versions. I assume the i3 is plenty for whs 2011. I just dont understand what you really lose using the T 35w chips. The power savings though I do understand and would be nice to have.
 

drescherjm

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Nov 19, 2008
Messages
14,935
I just dont understand what you really lose using the T 35w chips.

The question is what do you gain by using the T series processor? Remember that the power savings is not 35W versus 65W. It's about for a given work load how much total energy each processor uses. It is not as easy as it seems. The 35W chip because it runs slower requires more time to do the same amount of work so it will take longer to get to the lowest power state for a given workload than the 65W version.
 
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