Upgrading From Core 2 Duo - New Build Feedback

CookieFactory

Limp Gawd
Joined
May 17, 2006
Messages
310
I'm upgrading from a Core 2 Duo E6700 system, which unfortunately has started crashing randomly and often refusing to boot. Instead of troubleshooting, I figure it's been a good run and here's an excuse to upgrade. I have a new build picked out, and would appreciate some feedback/suggestions. The main uses will be general productivity, gaming, and software development.

1) What will you be doing with this PC? 40% general productivity and web browsing, 40% gaming, and 20% software development
2) What's your budget? Are tax and shipping included? I'd like to keep it below 2.5k USD, tax and shipping included
3) Which country do you live in? If the U.S, please tell us the state and city if possible. OH, USA
4) What exact parts do you need for that budget? Case, CPU, GFX, RAM, OS Drive, Motherboard, Heatsink, PSU
5) If reusing any parts, what parts will you be reusing? Data drive, monitor, peripherals
6) Will you be overclocking? Fairly light OC
7) What is the max resolution of your monitor? What size is it? 27" 2560 x 1440
8) When do you plan on building/buying the PC? ASAP
9) What features do you need in a motherboard? USB 3.0, eSATA, SATA 6 Gbps, prefer built-in bluetooth but not necessary
10) Do you already have a legit and reusable/transferable OS key/license? Yes, Win 7 or 8 x64
12) What's the nature of your software development? Mostly Java EE stuff, but also other things like app or web development in a variety of languages


Here's what I've picked out so far:

Processor: Intel Core i7-3930K
Motherboard: ASUS Sabertooth X79
Graphics Card: Gigabyte AMD Radeon HD 7970 OC 3GB
RAM: Corsair Vengeance 32GB (4x8GB) DDR3 1600 MHz (CML16GX3M2A1600C10 x 2)
Heatsink: Noctua NH-D14 SE2011
Case: Silverstone Tek FT02B-W-USB3.0
Power Supply: Seasonic G Series SSR-550RM 550W Modular PSU
OS Drive: Samsung Electronics 840 Pro Series 2.5-Inch 256 GB
Data Drive: Will be re-using current 1 TB WD drive
Monitor: Will be re-using current Dell U2713HM

Thanks!
 
Last edited:

Dangman

Ninja Editor SuperMod
Joined
Dec 15, 2005
Messages
46,062
Please answer the stickied "ANSWER THESE QUESTIONS FIRST!" so that we can help you better.

In addition to those questions, I have some additional questions:
11) What's the model number of that RAM?
12) What's the nature of your software development? A lot of multi-threaded programming?
 

jmilcher

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Feb 3, 2008
Messages
4,465
If this isnt yet purchased, I would go with a 3770k and a nice 1155 board instead. You are not running more than 16 gigs of ram, or multi GPU's so the x79 will make zero difference with what you are using it for.
 

E4g1e

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
May 21, 2002
Messages
7,064
I'm upgrading from a Core 2 Duo E6700 system, which unfortunately has started crashing randomly and often refusing to boot. Instead of troubleshooting, I figure it's been a good run and here's an excuse to upgrade. I have a new build picked out, and would appreciate some feedback/suggestions. The main uses will be general productivity, gaming, and software development.

Processor: Intel Core i7-3930K
Motherboard: ASUS Sabertooth X79
Graphics Card: Gigabyte AMD Radeon HD 7970 OC 3GB
RAM: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2x8GB) DDR3 1600 MHz (PC3 12800)
Heatsink: Noctua NH-D14 SE2011
Case: Silverstone Tek FT02B-W-USB3.0
Power Supply: Seasonic 850W 80 Plus Gold
OS Drive: Intel 520 Series Solid-State Drive 240 GB
Data Drive: Will be re-using current 1 TB WD drive
Monitor: Will be re-using current Dell U2713HM

Thanks!
The problem is that there are two distinctly different versions of the Corsair Vengeance DDR3 RAM modules: One (CMZ) with tall heatsinks that will interfere with the proper installation of such a monster tower HSF such as that Noctua, the other (CML) with lower-profile heatsinks that are barely taller than the RAM's PCB itself (and thus can fit underneath the tower HSF).

In addition, using only two sticks of RAM in a system that's designed to run with four sticks of RAM may hinder real-world performance in some applications: Some of the software development apps are especially sensitive to such performance degradation from lower-than-expected memory throughput. That LGA 2011 platform would run its memory in only dual-channel mode (after all, you cannot have quad-channel with only two sticks of RAM) - and LGA 2011 systems may actually perform slower than LGA 1155 systems at the same clock speed when the former is starved for memory throughput.
 

CookieFactory

Limp Gawd
Joined
May 17, 2006
Messages
310
The problem is that there are two distinctly different versions of the Corsair Vengeance DDR3 RAM modules: One (CMZ) with tall heatsinks that will interfere with the proper installation of such a monster tower HSF such as that Noctua, the other (CML) with lower-profile heatsinks that are barely taller than the RAM's PCB itself (and thus can fit underneath the tower HSF).

In addition, using only two sticks of RAM in a system that's designed to run with four sticks of RAM may hinder real-world performance in some applications: Some of the software development apps are especially sensitive to such performance degradation from lower-than-expected memory throughput. That LGA 2011 platform would run its memory in only dual-channel mode (after all, you cannot have quad-channel with only two sticks of RAM) - and LGA 2011 systems may actually perform slower than LGA 1155 systems at the same clock speed when the former is starved for memory throughput.
Ah, that's very good to know, especially the heat-sink clearance point. It looks like Amazon does have the CML versions as well, albeit at a bit higher price. Regarding the second, I suppose the options would be to opt for 32 gigs of RAM or go with a 1155 build instead.
 

Dangman

Ninja Editor SuperMod
Joined
Dec 15, 2005
Messages
46,062
Regarding the second, I suppose the options would be to opt for 32 gigs of RAM or go with a 1155 build instead.
Well, whether or not that option is worth it is largely dependent on whether or not the capability to get up to 64GB of RAM and have an extra two cores is worth the extra ~$350 to you.

In other words, if you're more than likely using more than 32GB of RAM and your extensive programming use is extremely heavily multi-threaded to the point where two extra cores would make a big difference or you want to cut down on compile times, stick with the socket 2011 option

Also, you haven't mentioned any plans for Crossfire or SLI. As such, you do not need such a large PSU. As such, you'll actually be fine with this PSU:
$90 - Seasonic G Series SSR-550RM 550W Modular PSU
 

CookieFactory

Limp Gawd
Joined
May 17, 2006
Messages
310
Well, whether or not that option is worth it is largely dependent on whether or not the capability to get up to 64GB of RAM and have an extra two cores is worth the extra ~$350 to you.

In other words, if you're more than likely using more than 32GB of RAM and your extensive programming use is extremely heavily multi-threaded to the point where two extra cores would make a big difference or you want to cut down on compile times, stick with the socket 2011 option

Also, you haven't mentioned any plans for Crossfire or SLI. As such, you do not need such a large PSU. As such, you'll actually be fine with this PSU:
$90 - Seasonic G Series SSR-550RM 550W Modular PSU
That's a good call on the PSU as I really doubt I'll be going CF or SLI. Thanks!
 

aviphysics

Weaksauce
Joined
Sep 27, 2011
Messages
75
SSD wise, I'd go for the higher performing Samsung 840 Pro series SSD.

Since you're in Ohio, how far are you from these Microcenter locations?:
http://microcenter.com/site/stores/columbus.aspx
http://microcenter.com/site/stores/mayfield-heights.aspx
http://microcenter.com/site/stores/sharonville.aspx
I don't see the point. The regular 250GB and 500GB 840 SSD's are about half the $/GB and performance is still really good, especially on the 500 GB. The speed difference in most tasks probably isn't even noticeable.
 

Dangman

Ninja Editor SuperMod
Joined
Dec 15, 2005
Messages
46,062
I don't see the point. The regular 250GB and 500GB 840 SSD's are about half the $/GB and performance is still really good, especially on the 500 GB. The speed difference in most tasks probably isn't even noticeable.
First, I'm not sure where you got "half the $/GB" from. Using Amazon prices, the Samsung 840 Pro 256GB costs $229 (.89 cents a gig) whereas the Samsung 840 250GB costs $170 (0.68 cents a gig). The Samsung 840 Pro 512GB costs $449 (~0.88 cents a gogwhereas the Samsung 840 500GB costs $328 (~0.66 cents a gig). I don't see how .68 cents is about half of .89 cents.

Second, for this kind of usage, I'd err on the side of caution and go with a SSD that isn't using the TLC tech like the Samsung 840 does. In other words, I still have some concerns about the longevity of the Samsung 840. Considering that the OP has a fairly substantial budget, the OP's long-term use of the PC, the slight increase in storage, higher chance of longevity, and higher technical performance, the extra cash for the 840 Pro is well worth it IMO.
 

CookieFactory

Limp Gawd
Joined
May 17, 2006
Messages
310
Nice, the Samsung looks to be quite a bit faster than the Intel model I had initially picked so I'll go with the Samsung 840 Pro 256 GB. Regarding MicroCenter, I'm about 10-15 minutes from one.
 

Dangman

Ninja Editor SuperMod
Joined
Dec 15, 2005
Messages
46,062
Nice, the Samsung looks to be quite a bit faster than the Intel model I had initially picked so I'll go with the Samsung 840 Pro 256 GB. Regarding MicroCenter, I'm about 10-15 minutes from one.
In that case, make sure to pick up the CPU from Microcenter since it'll be a bit cheaper than buying online.
 

aviphysics

Weaksauce
Joined
Sep 27, 2011
Messages
75
First, I'm not sure where you got "half the $/GB" from. Using Amazon prices, the Samsung 840 Pro 256GB costs $229 (.89 cents a gig) whereas the Samsung 840 250GB costs $170 (0.68 cents a gig). The Samsung 840 Pro 512GB costs $449 (~0.88 cents a gogwhereas the Samsung 840 500GB costs $328 (~0.66 cents a gig). I don't see how .68 cents is about half of .89 cents.

Second, for this kind of usage, I'd err on the side of caution and go with a SSD that isn't using the TLC tech like the Samsung 840 does. In other words, I still have some concerns about the longevity of the Samsung 840. Considering that the OP has a fairly substantial budget, the OP's long-term use of the PC, the slight increase in storage, higher chance of longevity, and higher technical performance, the extra cash for the 840 Pro is well worth it IMO.
I saw much better deals than that on the 840 when I was shopping.

About reliability, any drive can fail at any time, so anyone should make regular backups. Beyond that, if it fails under warranty, Samsung replaces it (perhaps even with a better drive) and by the time the warranty runs out the drive will be relative cheap to replace.
 

Dangman

Ninja Editor SuperMod
Joined
Dec 15, 2005
Messages
46,062
I saw much better deals than that on the 840 when I was shopping.
And? The OP was planning ASAP and therefore did not have time to deal hunt. Nor did you post said deals that were current.
About reliability, any drive can fail at any time, so anyone should make regular backups. Beyond that, if it fails under warranty, Samsung replaces it (perhaps even with a better drive) and by the time the warranty runs out the drive will be relative cheap to replace.
Yes any SSD can fail at any time. However, you have a higher chance of reliability and not dying with the 840 Pro over the 840. And that's worth paying for.

In any case, this discussion is a bit moot since the OP already bought the parts.

@ CookieFactory!
Good luck man!
 
Top