TSMC now sinking asets into developing 2nm node!

Lakados

2[H]4U
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Feb 3, 2014
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That explains why intel was sluggish to increasing core counts, but what about their process tech? That used to be more reliable in marching forward. They were/are on 14nm literally forever. They were ahead of TSMC, then let them catch up and pass them. There must be some hidden story on the back end that has not been told.

Was it a case of not enough R&D money? Or was it a series of random setbacks and bad luck combined with better luck for TSCM?
What happened there Intel’s management had a great idea it would have been revolutionary for manufacturing but they couldn’t make it work. When they missed goal post after goalpost management refused to turn back so they doubled down and then tripled down. And finally made it work, as the rest of the world passed them by and their revolutionary approach was passed by, by more traditional approaches that got refined after years of use.
Management couldn’t turn back because golden parachutes were on the line so the poor bastards trying to make it work just got the crap kicked out of them for long ass time while Intel traded management teams like Pokémon cards.
 

Lakados

2[H]4U
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Feb 3, 2014
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The FX-60 was a dual-core CPU released in 2006 for $1600, when then high-end CPUs were going for less than $1000 - meaning, at that point, and right before Intel released Conroe (Core 2), AMD started price gouging customers.
The point - since it has to be spelled out for you - is that if Intel doesn't get it's act together soon, the price gouging is going to be reversed and AMD will start doing so, hence why I said competition is needed from both ends, aka, history repeats itself.
It’s not price gouging, it’s charging a fair market rate for a premium limited availability part.
 

Mega6

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Aug 13, 2017
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That was their pre pandemic timeline, pretty sure that got pushed back a fair bit and the risk production process generally takes a year or so. So 2023 for actual production workloads sounds about right.
Pandemic-wise Taiwan is not the United States, they are and have been much better off. A later article is HERE

"start production on a mass scale in 2022."
 

Grimlakin

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Oct 9, 2001
Messages
1,336
So they cn inject nanomachines into your blood stream nd control your thoughts. Total anhiliation of free will. Looking forward..
I don't know if I like... znrk... *this is the best future ever* "This is the best future ever."
 
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