TomTom for Android: $23.99 with lifetime maps

/dev/null

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Mar 31, 2001
Messages
14,963
Supposedly 50% off. It's in the google play store. I"m guessing it works offline as it requires 2.2GB of space. Anyone used this?

Ugh: Reviews say max screen res for this app is 1920x1080 so I guess my 10" google tablet with 2560x1600 won't work.
 

elite.mafia

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Aug 23, 2004
Messages
13,453
Why would anybody use this over google maps? Serious question. I've owned a tom tom and a Garmin and have used Waze, apple maps, and google maps. Google maps is the best navigation I've used and it's free.
 

/dev/null

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Mar 31, 2001
Messages
14,963
Why would anybody use this over google maps? Serious question. I've owned a tom tom and a Garmin and have used Waze, apple maps, and google maps. Google maps is the best navigation I've used and it's free.

Because google maps requires a data connection...?
 

/dev/null

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Mar 31, 2001
Messages
14,963
Oh. Okay.

I think google maps will let you actually cache some data offline, but not enough (IMHO) to be useful. I have family out east (having to travel through west virginal) & have taken trips north to the UP (MIchigan) where there was no cell phone service at all. On one of the trips up to UP there was no radio either :) I know when I want to review my route on the lake express/ss badger here in the midwest, there is no cell signal ~ 10 miles offshore for several hours.

With that being said, if you JUST want an offline map without guidance/directions & poi there are some useful free ones in the android store.

If you live in/almost never leave a large urban area & you have a smartphone with data, I think you are right.

With that being said, A co-worker tried to use this for a motorcycle trip we took (I just memorized the roads) & he said the turn directions came _WAY_ too late to be useful.
 
Last edited:

Ducman69

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Jul 12, 2007
Messages
10,538
Offline use and I imagine it has POIs, and plus google maps interface sucks donkey balls for one finger operation. Not that I have donkey experience, but its hard not to see the similarities.
 

nekrosoft13

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Jan 4, 2005
Messages
1,476
Why would anybody use this over google maps? Serious question. I've owned a tom tom and a Garmin and have used Waze, apple maps, and google maps. Google maps is the best navigation I've used and it's free.

when you drive farther away from the towns and you don't have 3G/4G connection, google maps is useless.
 

nilepez

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Jan 21, 2005
Messages
11,700
Why would anybody use this over google maps? Serious question. I've owned a tom tom and a Garmin and have used Waze, apple maps, and google maps. Google maps is the best navigation I've used and it's free.

Imagine yourself in lost a national park. That's why you want a GPS that works without cell service. The question is, "Is this as good as a dedicated GPS"?

If so, then this seems like a no brainer at this price.
 

NeonFlak

Limp Gawd
Joined
Jun 11, 2004
Messages
314
With that being said, A co-worker tried to use this for a motorcycle trip we took (I just memorized the roads) & he said the turn directions came _WAY_ too late to be useful.


The only problem with nav apps on a phone/tablet is the above. The usefulness is going to completely depend on the gps implementation in said device. Does the device have good gps, or did the manu skimp on gps to count on cell tower/wifi assist, a-gps.
 

/dev/null

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Mar 31, 2001
Messages
14,963
The only problem with nav apps on a phone/tablet is the above. The usefulness is going to completely depend on the gps implementation in said device. Does the device have good gps, or did the manu skimp on gps to count on cell tower/wifi assist, a-gps.

This was an iphone 5 with google maps app.
 

defy

Gawd
Joined
Sep 30, 2006
Messages
959
Shows as $32.99 for me (50% off already included) on Google Play Store.
 

beowulf7

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Jun 30, 2005
Messages
10,433
It's basically a digital map. Without a data connection, it can't navigate. So think of having old-fashion fold-out maps at your disposal on your phone, anywhere in the country. That's really the only selling point for someone who wants to use a smartphone without a data plan.
 

/dev/null

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Mar 31, 2001
Messages
14,963
It's basically a digital map. Without a data connection, it can't navigate. So think of having old-fashion fold-out maps at your disposal on your phone, anywhere in the country. That's really the only selling point for someone who wants to use a smartphone without a data plan.

Why can't it navigate without a data plan?
 

pgaster

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
May 17, 2008
Messages
1,309
The cheap Nokia 520 and 521 have Nokia Here maps that work offline and without a cell signal. All yo need is a GPS signal and it's fairly quick to get a lock. You can download maps for one country only though from what I understand. I have a 521 with a few states downloaded and was just in Wisconsin in some rural areas for Thanksgiving. The maps were a bit off in a few spots but it was helpful and nice to know I had something vs nothing I would have had with just google maps. Cell signal was 2G at best in many spots. If you can get one of these phones really cheap they could make a nice stand alone gps and backup phone. Of course it's a lot more than this software.
 

Jagger100

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Oct 31, 2004
Messages
7,620
Why would anybody use this over google maps? Serious question. I've owned a tom tom and a Garmin and have used Waze, apple maps, and google maps. Google maps is the best navigation I've used and it's free.
Have you used Google maps since the last update?

I noticed that its calling out the turn right when I'm up on it now, no advanced warning & I'm not talking about it telling you the turn 1/2 mile out. I'm talking when its time to make the turn. Missed a key turn once already. I'm not the only person who noticed.
 

elite.mafia

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Aug 23, 2004
Messages
13,453
Have you used Google maps since the last update?

I noticed that its calling out the turn right when I'm up on it now, no advanced warning & I'm not talking about it telling you the turn 1/2 mile out. I'm talking when its time to make the turn. Missed a key turn once already. I'm not the only person who noticed.

I don't use the voice prompts, I actually look at the screen. So no, I;ve not experienced that.
 

SirKronan

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Dec 7, 2007
Messages
4,613
Have you used Google maps since the last update?

I noticed that its calling out the turn right when I'm up on it now, no advanced warning & I'm not talking about it telling you the turn 1/2 mile out. I'm talking when its time to make the turn. Missed a key turn once already. I'm not the only person who noticed.

I have too!! Glad to hear it's not just me. Actually ... wait, I'm NOT glad to hear that. Although at least now I know I'm not alone. I have also missed one turn so far since the last update.

I don't use the voice prompts, I actually look at the screen. So no, I;ve not experienced that.

Sometimes I have to keep my eyes on slick roads, as I live in Idaho, and even though I put it right in my windshield, it can be distracting in an already unsettling snow storm. It's nice just to know you're coming up on a turn well in advance.
 

Bone_Enterprise

Enter in the Rear
Joined
Apr 21, 2006
Messages
4,422
Without a data plan (or no access to data - like some national parks), how will the phone know where you are?

Your GPS does not use mobile data services, I use GPS navigation apps like this on my old ASUS Transformer tablet and it works great, which actually is all it gets used for anymore.
 

/dev/null

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Mar 31, 2001
Messages
14,963
It's basically streaming the map information as you go, so you don't have to have to use a ton of space on your phone to hold the maps.

But this tomtom app should work without a data plan, afaik, right?

Storage is cheap. data plans much less so. 2GB is nothing these days.
 

King of Heroes

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Mar 26, 2008
Messages
2,006
The cheap Nokia 520 and 521 have Nokia Here maps that work offline and without a cell signal. All yo need is a GPS signal and it's fairly quick to get a lock. You can download maps for one country only though from what I understand. I have a 521 with a few states downloaded and was just in Wisconsin in some rural areas for Thanksgiving. The maps were a bit off in a few spots but it was helpful and nice to know I had something vs nothing I would have had with just google maps. Cell signal was 2G at best in many spots. If you can get one of these phones really cheap they could make a nice stand alone gps and backup phone. Of course it's a lot more than this software.

This is one of the reasons I've grown attached to my Lumia 521 (and I never intended to). The Nokia-exclusive apps are very good.
 

beowulf7

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Jun 30, 2005
Messages
10,433
Your GPS does not use mobile data services, I use GPS navigation apps like this on my old ASUS Transformer tablet and it works great, which actually is all it gets used for anymore.
Without data, how would the GPS satellites communicate with the phone? If I put my phone in airplane mode but turned on GPS, would Google Maps still work?
 

MrMike

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Nov 4, 2000
Messages
6,511
Without data, how would the GPS satellites communicate with the phone? If I put my phone in airplane mode but turned on GPS, would Google Maps still work?

GPS satellites aren't considered part of the data connection of a cell phone or tablet and GPS still works in airplane mode.

Whether Google Maps will work or not is a different issue entirely, as it depends on a data connection unless you cached all the areas you plan on traveling in.
 

roscolo

Weaksauce
Joined
Jan 27, 2011
Messages
115
Supposedly 50% off. It's in the google play store. I"m guessing it works offline as it requires 2.2GB of space. Anyone used this?

Ugh: Reviews say max screen res for this app is 1920x1080 so I guess my 10" google tablet with 2560x1600 won't work.

Is there a link or promo code for this? I see TomTom U.S.A. in the Google Play store...is this it? Because the price I see is $45.99
 

Riccochet

Fully [H]
Joined
Apr 11, 2007
Messages
24,057
Without data, how would the GPS satellites communicate with the phone? If I put my phone in airplane mode but turned on GPS, would Google Maps still work?

GPS satellites transmit a signal down to earth. They all transmit time information. Your GPS device picks up those signals and determines, based on the amount of signals it's receiving, the satellites positions and the time information to determine your position on the earth. No internet based data is used at all.
 

roscolo

Weaksauce
Joined
Jan 27, 2011
Messages
115
Looks like the deal is dead. Thanks for this info. though, because I saw the Sygic app right next to this one, it looks like it uses the same TomTom maps and based on the reviews it looks like the Sygic actually works better, too. And it's F-R-E-E. Gonna try it out.

Edit: Crap. Sygic is NOT free. Just a free trial. $34 for lifetime license for u.s.a. maps after that. Hell, I bought a DEDICATED GPS for $39 !
 
Last edited:

Bone_Enterprise

Enter in the Rear
Joined
Apr 21, 2006
Messages
4,422
Without data, how would the GPS satellites communicate with the phone? If I put my phone in airplane mode but turned on GPS, would Google Maps still work?

I don't think you know how a GPS works at all.

As mentioned unless you download and cache a map, no Google Maps would not work, hence the point of having a stand alone GPS software like the OP mentioned and because of that I will always in some form have a stand alone GPS app installed on my tablet and phone.
 

beowulf7

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Jun 30, 2005
Messages
10,433
GPS satellites aren't considered part of the data connection of a cell phone or tablet and GPS still works in airplane mode.

Whether Google Maps will work or not is a different issue entirely, as it depends on a data connection unless you cached all the areas you plan on traveling in.

GPS satellites transmit a signal down to earth. They all transmit time information. Your GPS device picks up those signals and determines, based on the amount of signals it's receiving, the satellites positions and the time information to determine your position on the earth. No internet based data is used at all.

I don't think you know how a GPS works at all.

As mentioned unless you download and cache a map, no Google Maps would not work, hence the point of having a stand alone GPS software like the OP mentioned and because of that I will always in some form have a stand alone GPS app installed on my tablet and phone.
Thanks for the replies. I understand how a GPS works, like something that is stand-alone (e.g., a Garmin navigation unit). But when it comes to being used with phones, I thought it communicates with the phone's provider and then relayed to the phone, i.e., using data. At least in terms of how Google Maps is tracked.

But I can understand if it's really only the Google Map detail that is being tracked by the phone (using data), then once that map is cached or downloaded, then GPS to track your presence would be separate from the data used by drawing out the maps on one's phone.
 

paperwastage

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Jul 12, 2009
Messages
1,131
Thanks for the replies. I understand how a GPS works, like something that is stand-alone (e.g., a Garmin navigation unit). But when it comes to being used with phones, I thought it communicates with the phone's provider and then relayed to the phone, i.e., using data. At least in terms of how Google Maps is tracked.

But I can understand if it's really only the Google Map detail that is being tracked by the phone (using data), then once that map is cached or downloaded, then GPS to track your presence would be separate from the data used by drawing out the maps on one's phone.

you are confused in two areas

#1
map+routing engine being on device(like nokia maps, and this tomtom), and map +routing engine being downloaded real-time(eg google maps). the latter requires a data connection to be useful




#2: GPS with A-GPS

GPS itself looks for the (weak) signals transmitted by the satellites way above us, and triangulates with at least 3 satellites

A-GPS, on the other hand, uses cell towers to triangulate your location

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assisted_GPS


typically, GPS is slower to get a fix, because you have to download the gps Almanac (containing orbital info of the satellites), then get enough data from the satellites to calculate the location. interference plays a role, since satellites are so far above us, and buildings can block signal. hot/warm starts make it go faster (use GPS recently, download Almanac before hand/through data connection)

A-GPS is faster (since cell towers are closer, you get more bandwidth to transfer location data), but less accurate
 

kumquat

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Dec 7, 2005
Messages
5,269
I believe this app also does multi-point routing, which Google Nav does not.
 

kumquat

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Dec 7, 2005
Messages
5,269
Thanks for the replies. I understand how a GPS works, like something that is stand-alone (e.g., a Garmin navigation unit). But when it comes to being used with phones, I thought it communicates with the phone's provider and then relayed to the phone, i.e., using data. At least in terms of how Google Maps is tracked.

But I can understand if it's really only the Google Map detail that is being tracked by the phone (using data), then once that map is cached or downloaded, then GPS to track your presence would be separate from the data used by drawing out the maps on one's phone.

No.

Phones have actual GPS receivers in them. Using cell networks and Wifi can only get your location within a general area. To pinpoint your exact location, phones fire up their GPS receivers.

The way GPS works, it can take a long time to get an initial fix. Phones make this initial fix much faster by first getting the general location from cell/wifi location services. But you can use a cell phone's GPS in the absence of any sort of data signal of any kind because GPS works totally independently.

Your phone does not communicate with the GPS satellites any more than your car radio communicates with the radio station antenna. It's a receive-only system. The satellites transmit their signal, and your phone's GPS receiver accepts them. It then performs calculations on their time-encoded signals to calculate its exact position. Same with standalone GPS units. It's not a 2-way street.
 

mope54

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Oct 2, 2004
Messages
7,442
No.

Phones have actual GPS receivers in them. Using cell networks and Wifi can only get your location within a general area. To pinpoint your exact location, phones fire up their GPS receivers.
actually beowulf is correct. Phones *rarely*, if ever, have GPS receivers in them. Even when they claim "GPS" they have a-GPS. The transformer tablet someone referenced earlier *may* have a true GPS receiver but even that's not certain until he goes out into a remote area without wi-fi or cell towers. A tablet stands a higher likelihood of having "true" GPS but it's not always a given and in most cases one will find conflicting information on the box, the sellers' sites, and manufacturing literature.

It costs a lot of money to implement an actual GPS receiver into a phone, draws a relatively large amount of energy, and is non-essential to the majority of customers, but manufacturers know people want GPS so they'll print the specifications in a way that suggests the device will meet that expectation.
 

Agenesis

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Sep 24, 2011
Messages
1,425
I have this app, got it a while back to use as backup just in case my dedicated unit fails. On my Note it's just as accurate as my 3597LMTHD. Not bad I must say since for $80 it compares to the flagship unit by Garmin.

It's completely usable without an Internet connection as long as you got the exact address of where you're going, otherwise you'll have to find it on the offline POI database. If you have an Internet connection then it just queries the Internet for the proper address. The graphics aren't exactly stellar but you'll understand it fine, it will tell you a few minutes ahead of time where to turn unlike my Garmin (which has caused many "oh shit" reactions), and best of all it makes noises when you're going over the speed limit, which my garmin also doesn't do. I'd say even at full price it's worth it if you have a limited data plan or if your data plan is just slow. (T-Mobile)

http://i.imgur.com/lC2SrD1.jpg
 

Towermax

Limp Gawd
Joined
Oct 30, 2006
Messages
196
The cheap Nokia 520 and 521 have Nokia Here maps that work offline and without a cell signal. All yo need is a GPS signal and it's fairly quick to get a lock. You can download maps for one country only though from what I understand.

Actually, it looks like you can download as many maps as you want. I've downloaded the US, Canada, and a couple of European countries on my 521, and they've all worked great and get regular updates.
 

kumquat

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Dec 7, 2005
Messages
5,269
actually beowulf is correct. Phones *rarely*, if ever, have GPS receivers in them. Even when they claim "GPS" they have a-GPS. The transformer tablet someone referenced earlier *may* have a true GPS receiver but even that's not certain until he goes out into a remote area without wi-fi or cell towers. A tablet stands a higher likelihood of having "true" GPS but it's not always a given and in most cases one will find conflicting information on the box, the sellers' sites, and manufacturing literature.

It costs a lot of money to implement an actual GPS receiver into a phone, draws a relatively large amount of energy, and is non-essential to the majority of customers, but manufacturers know people want GPS so they'll print the specifications in a way that suggests the device will meet that expectation.

He's not correct. A-GPS does not use cell towers to triangulate position. It uses cell data networks to assist, but location is still determined via actual GPS: hence, assisted GPS. If A-GPS used cell towers to triangulate position it would be called "tower triangulation positioning system" or "almost-like-GPS" not "assisted GPS." Apparently some units aren't allowed to work autonomously or can't download catalog info without a data connection of some kind.

I however haven't encountered a phone that can't lock GPS coordinates without data service. I've been in the backcountry, far from any semblance of a data signal, with many different phones and never had a problem getting coordinates. iPhones, HTC units, Samsung units, Motorola units. Just last week I was hiking in the backcountry where there was zero data service and both my Moto X and my GF's iPhone 4S had no problem tracking the entire trip.
 
Last edited:

BigJayDogg3

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Jul 21, 2009
Messages
1,674
actually beowulf is correct. Phones *rarely*, if ever, have GPS receivers in them. Even when they claim "GPS" they have a-GPS. The transformer tablet someone referenced earlier *may* have a true GPS receiver but even that's not certain until he goes out into a remote area without wi-fi or cell towers. A tablet stands a higher likelihood of having "true" GPS but it's not always a given and in most cases one will find conflicting information on the box, the sellers' sites, and manufacturing literature.

It costs a lot of money to implement an actual GPS receiver into a phone, draws a relatively large amount of energy, and is non-essential to the majority of customers, but manufacturers know people want GPS so they'll print the specifications in a way that suggests the device will meet that expectation.

No. This may have been true in 2008, but modern phones have true GPS radios in them. Even going back to my HTC Fuze (which didn't have a data plan) I had navigation on my phone.
 

efishta

Limp Gawd
Joined
Oct 12, 2004
Messages
184
actually beowulf is correct. Phones *rarely*, if ever, have GPS receivers in them....

Actually, beowulf is incorrect, as are you. Take any Android phone in the market today and load up a GPS utility of some sort, and have it show you real time satellite signal tracking, speed & acceleration, etc., all while having the cell & wifi radio off. It would work just the same using offline navigation software such as TomTom.
 
Top