Rockit 88 - Intel CPU Delid Tool

Armenius

Fully [H]
Joined
Jan 28, 2014
Messages
22,623
Rockit 88 - Intel CPU Delid Tool

World's safest CPU delid tool. Delid your CPU with complete confidence. Works on Haswell, Devil's Canyon, Skylake and more.

It only had a goal of $600 which was quickly met. Looks like he will probably sell them for $35 USD based on the reward tiers. The Kickstarter is open until April 15.

Looks like a good design. It's spreading the load on the PCB via maximum surface area so pressure is only being applied against the IHS. And it's in a box, so you don't have to worry about your CPU going flying :D.
 

KingRaptor

Weaksauce
Joined
Jul 24, 2012
Messages
118
That is pretty useful. I wonder if it's one-size-fits-all? Aren't some Intel chips taller (the -E class chips like Haswell-E)?
 

CrazyRob

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Aug 26, 2004
Messages
1,274
That is pretty useful. I wonder if it's one-size-fits-all? Aren't some Intel chips taller (the -E class chips like Haswell-E)?
This definitely will not work with -e class cpu's (2011/2011-v3). Not only are they physically a different shape, as you brought up, but the IHS is also soldered on, so attempting to delid would likely destroy the cpu.
 

KingRaptor

Weaksauce
Joined
Jul 24, 2012
Messages
118
I hope they add the appropriate disclaimers about the -E class chips. I know everyone who uses this to delid probably knows the difference between regular and -E chips, but there will be some moron in the real world who purposefully destroys an -E chip and tries to blame it on the product.
 

KazeoHin

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Sep 7, 2011
Messages
8,067
I hope they add the appropriate disclaimers about the -E class chips. I know everyone who uses this to delid probably knows the difference between regular and -E chips, but there will be some moron in the real world who purposefully destroys an -E chip and tries to blame it on the product.
E-series (2011-X) chips are twice the size of 115X chips. You wouldn't even be able to fit a 2011 chip on the device.

This is pretty awesome. Obviously Intel's negligence is spawning a market.
 

NoNRG

2[H]4U
Joined
Dec 16, 2007
Messages
2,125
After you break the epoxy that secures the lid, what do you use instead to secure the IHS?
 

MrGreg62

Lurker
Joined
May 2, 2003
Messages
1,096
You typically wouldn't re-attach it with anything other than the replacement paste and the clamping action of the cooler.
 

CaptNumbNutz

Bulls[H]it Master
Joined
Apr 11, 2007
Messages
20,992
After you break the epoxy that secures the lid, what do you use instead to secure the IHS?
You typically wouldn't re-attach it with anything other than the replacement paste and the clamping action of the cooler.
As stated, there really isn't a need.

However, if you felt the need to secure it, I would use something non-permanent and non-electrically conductive such as rubber cement. I would put a tiny drop on each corner outside the IHS, not underneath the metal lip where the old epoxy was. A tiny drop would be just enough to hold it in place as you drop it in the socket and clamp it down.
 
Last edited:

NoNRG

2[H]4U
Joined
Dec 16, 2007
Messages
2,125
Thanks for the answers. I had also sent a message to the Kickstarter creator asking the same question before both of you answered. His response is below.

We have tried many different products to secure the IHS after delidding.
Gasket compound, silicone, construction adhesive and all have their downsides.

The big problem is they tend to swell as they harden and this pushes the IHS up and away from the CPU. Of course this causes the temps to climb back up to almost the same as before the delid!

The solution we have found is to use super glue. We have had very good luck with it. Easy to apply, easy to delid again later and the big plus is only a very slight increase in temps. Our testing shows 1 to 2c average at high overclocked speeds.

I will have a complete instruction set on how to do it after the Kickstarter is over.
 
Top