Ok to put Case on wooden table when taking out Motherboard?

3far4shot

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I am going to put the motherboard on a box tho and put the box on my bed. But while i am taking the Motherboard out of the case, is it alright to put the case on a wooden table?(i pc game on it)
 

Mithent

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I don't see any reason why a wooden table would be a problem. It's not a bad idea to leave the power cord plugged in but switched off at the wall (or if not, PSU), if you can, so the case is still earthed.
 

Down8

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I build all my systems on the kitchen table - no carpet to build up static, and non-conductive wood table.
"America is the only place where ppl hunt and are not hungry"
I wonder when the last time an uppity Briton ate the spoils of a Fox Hunt...?
 
R

ring.of.steel

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i build all my systems on a wooden desk in a carpetted room, never had any problems with static..
 

JDAdams

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I build all of mine right on the carpet, and I've never had any problems either.
 

anime4u

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Wood, cardboard and anti-static motherboard bags are all good to use as a safe platform.
 

Dudeyourlame

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Do you drive on the left also?

as far as i can tell, rain seems to spoil top gear from time to time... im guessing theres always moisture in the air there? ...well more than minnesota when its a sultry 15F !
 

RustedAngel

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I just use one of those anti-static wrist ties. However, I prefer to build on tile or some other non-carpet surface if I can help it.

As an aside, a buddy of mine has an extended warranty on his laptop, it was coming towards the end and if he had one more repair they would junk it out and replace it under the terms. I tried everything with his RAM, balloons, carpet, packing peanuts. The thing still ran memtest all night with no errors. Go figure :(
 

filthysanchez

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I just use one of those anti-static wrist ties. However, I prefer to build on tile or some other non-carpet surface if I can help it.

As an aside, a buddy of mine has an extended warranty on his laptop, it was coming towards the end and if he had one more repair they would junk it out and replace it under the terms. I tried everything with his RAM, balloons, carpet, packing peanuts. The thing still ran memtest all night with no errors. Go figure :(

Build up static in your body(rub socks on carpet or somethign) then try to bridge a spark.
 

BillParrish

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Anti-static bags are conductive, its ok to build on one but for heavens sake remove it if you power up the board outside the case.
 

scoob8000

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Wood, cardboard and anti-static motherboard bags are all good to use as a safe platform.

I always thought the same thing about static bags, but I stand corrected.

Sitting a board on top of an empty static bag is no different then sitting the board directly on a cardboard box.

The static bag only works when the item to be protected is enclosed in the bag. It acts as a faraday cage.

No matter what your work surface, have a good ground nearby. Even if it's just another device that is plugged in with a 3 prong outlet. Make contact with that frequently, you should be fine.
 

Wshmaster0

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From my experience, static is a myth that started a long time ago. A lot of veteran computer builders I know have told me that normal day to day static from the air or even from carpet will not be enough to destroy a part.

What you need to watch out for is putting the motherboard on something that will conduct electricity if you plan to build it outside of a case. sometimes you will short something and yes that can start fires lol.
 

JSpecGC8

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From my experience, static is a myth that started a long time ago. A lot of veteran computer builders I know have told me that normal day to day static from the air or even from carpet will not be enough to destroy a part.

What you need to watch out for is putting the motherboard on something that will conduct electricity if you plan to build it outside of a case. sometimes you will short something and yes that can start fires lol.


Alot of VETERAN computer builders are full of shit then, and not ment to be rude. I have seen static fry aircraft parts that are built to withstand the rough landings and this is that normal day static from air or even carpet.
 

Wshmaster0

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Alot of VETERAN computer builders are full of shit then, and not ment to be rude. I have seen static fry aircraft parts that are built to withstand the rough landings and this is that normal day static from air or even carpet.

I can't talk for people who are around aircraft parts, but never in any of my builds have I ever created enough juice from carpet to fry anything. That's with or without static protection and any type of static bags around.

If you're not related to Magneto or purposely trying to charge charge up, I doubt you'll be able to fry any equipment.

I didn't say I couldn't be convinced otherwise either, so tell me about something that these guys haven't told me =).
 

fsi16v

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thought i would put in my 2 cents.. i have built computers on the carpet, never had a problem with static.. i work with computer hardware all day, never shocked something and ruined it.

maybe im lucky, or maybe you have to try pretty hard to fry a computer with static created by yourself
 

BillParrish

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OK everyone with a EE degree in this thread raise their hand !

OK then, everyone who has worked in electronics fabrication/manufacturing industry in this thread raise their hand !
(slapping machines together on a workbench does NOT count.)



Thought so.

ESD is real, ESD can kill you parts. ESD is not nearly as much of as issue as it was because most IC's etc now have ESD protection built in. It is very stupid to ignore ESD however and the precautions are easy and if you bothered to read your manuals you will still see plenty of warnings. These warnings are not there because the manuf wanted to fill out space in the manual to make it look more impressive/thicker. In one of the few intelligent posts above a good point is made, it is STATIC electricity, does not matter what you build on, if you build up a charge and do not discharge it some how to ground and pick up say a ram chip carelessly by touching the contact fingers you may damage it. I always install the power supply in the chassis first, plug it into the wall with the power supply switch OFF. This provides a grounded chassis you can occasionally touch (hit the BARE METAL, like an exposed screw head or rivet, touching painted parts does not count). You were going to have to install this anyway so just do it and no worries. Then unpack and start building and occasionally touch the metal on the case. This is easy people and just good common sense no matter what method you use to mitigate the risk.

/mumble - bunch of newbies, never apparently have gotten a really good 1/4 inch jumping spark, loud pop, almost make you pee, static shock, shame polyester pants went out of style, then they would know what I am talking about and my usable wardrobe would double.

Or do wtf you want, its your stuff, but dont spread bad advice for others.
 

mtrupi

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To the original poster, wood without any finish is no problem. I would think some finishes like polyurethane are not the best to put the board on, but I am not sure how much of a concern it is. Your bed is almost certainly not a good idea.

To others, generally anti-static bags are not conductive. The kind I refer to as pink-poly do not form a Faraday cage and only prevent a buildup static charge. The type which do form a Faraday cage come in several varieties. They usually have a metalized film or mesh in between layers of anti-static plastic. If you puncture the bag in any way there is potential for a short circuit. There are others but these are the ones we commonly run across.

The handling recommendations I've seen most on this forum work just fine. Are you still at risk? Of course and depending on your liability you need extreme measures. Aerospace and medical companies come to mind. A professional PC builder I should at least have a static mat and wrist straps for when working with something outside the case. If it's in the case, just touching the metal case is sufficient. If you are unsure about doing this connect your wrist strap to the case. Leaving it plugged in to a switched off power supply couldn't hurt. Just make sure it's really off so there is no power to the board.
 

mtrupi

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OK everyone with a EE degree in this thread raise their hand !

OK then, everyone who has worked in electronics fabrication/manufacturing industry in this thread raise their hand !
(slapping machines together on a workbench does NOT count.)

---> o/
 

Gillbot

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OK everyone with a EE degree in this thread raise their hand !

OK then, everyone who has worked in electronics fabrication/manufacturing industry in this thread raise their hand !
(slapping machines together on a workbench does NOT count.)
raises hand...

that being said, i've fried parts with static but i still build my rigs right on the carpeted floor. If you groung yourself first and discharge you are usually ok. though i don't recommend working this way.
 

Tabasco69

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To the original poster, wood without any finish is no problem. I would think some finishes like polyurethane are not the best to put the board on, but I am not sure how much of a concern it is. Your bed is almost certainly not a good idea.

To others, generally anti-static bags are not conductive. The kind I refer to as pink-poly do not form a Faraday cage and only prevent a buildup static charge. The type which do form a Faraday cage come in several varieties. They usually have a metalized film or mesh in between layers of anti-static plastic. If you puncture the bag in any way there is potential for a short circuit. There are others but these are the ones we commonly run across.

The handling recommendations I've seen most on this forum work just fine. Are you still at risk? Of course and depending on your liability you need extreme measures. Aerospace and medical companies come to mind. A professional PC builder I should at least have a static mat and wrist straps for when working with something outside the case. If it's in the case, just touching the metal case is sufficient. If you are unsure about doing this connect your wrist strap to the case. Leaving it plugged in to a switched off power supply couldn't hurt. Just make sure it's really off so there is no power to the board.

Hmmm pc whiz you may be but wtf? "polyurethane" finish is conductive? I think not.....it is a plastic polymer....since when is plastic a conducter....far as I know it is a insulator.

I follow the tried true method of always installing he psu first and pluging it in having it on the off postion and go from there with my installation, occasionally brushing the case with my hand or forearm throughout the process....similar to what is mention by others.
 

mtrupi

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Hmmm pc whiz you may be but wtf? "polyurethane" finish is conductive? I think not.....it is a plastic polymer....since when is plastic a conducter....far as I know it is a insulator.

Not all plastics are created equal and without researching it I wouldn't casually say any particular finish is a problem.
 

8lack8rain

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Nov 11, 2005
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My friends and I like to buy top of the line parts and then take turns holding them, while performing electric torture on each other. If the parts survive then it is a sign. I woke up in a hospital once with a motherboard melted to my hands. Surprisingly, it still worked.

Here is a picture of my friend clutching a quad core behind his back. God, I hope this one works.
torture1-thumb.JPG
 
Joined
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OK everyone with a EE degree in this thread raise their hand !

OK then, everyone who has worked in electronics fabrication/manufacturing industry in this thread raise their hand !
(slapping machines together on a workbench does NOT count.)

---> o/

I agree.
 
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