Hyper-V memory performance hit in Windows 10

Discussion in 'Virtualized Computing' started by ochadd, Mar 12, 2017.

  1. ochadd

    ochadd Gawd

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    I recently built a new PC and found that Hyper-V hit memory and cache performance hard when installed. Screenshots were taken @ idle. No virtual machines running or created. Basically Hyper-V installed, restarted, benchmarked. Virtualbox does not seem to have the same problem.

    Before Hyper-V and without virtualization enabled in the bios.
    aida64_7700k_3_9_2017.png

    With Hyper-V installed and virtualization enabled.
    7700k_hyperv_asus.PNG

    Hyper-V uninstalled and virtualization enabled.
    7700k_uninstalled_hyperv.PNG

    I've always run Virtualbox on my personal home computer but run Hyper-V at work for production. Thought I'd try standardizing and run Hyper-V at home. Not sure if this is expected but I sure didn't.

    Virtualbox installed and virt. enabled.

    7700k_virtualbox.PNG
     
  2. Child of Wonder

    Child of Wonder 2[H]4U

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    When you install the Hyper-V role your OS is now a VM, hence the dip in performance.

    #Inception
     
  3. ochadd

    ochadd Gawd

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    Thanks for the info. I had no idea.
     
  4. PGHammer

    PGHammer 2[H]4U

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    Actually, running a type I hypervisor (any of them) would cause a hit compared to straight VT-x (not a large one, but it's there) - that is why they have typically been on servers - not workstations or even general PCs. Windows 8 was, in fact, the first general-purpose OS that was capable of supporting a type I hypervisor that was NOT a server OS; the only real flaw with Windows 8 was that EPT was not exactly commonplace outside of server CPUs; even more problematical was that it was more common in terms of AMD general-purpose CPUs than on Intel - my first Windows 8+ Hyper-V testbed was an AMD-driven HP Pavilion. (It's running Windows 10 today - I use it for Android-development testing.) Nowadays, EPT is MUCH more common - and especially on Intel hardware, as is HTT support - while Hyper-V can use it, it's not a requirement. However, those that think of themselves as gamers - and especially hardcore gamers - hate running ANYTHING in the background while gaming.