Help to fix a Aours GTX 1080ti

Mustafa_

n00b
Joined
Mar 28, 2021
Messages
1
Hello guys , I have Graphic card ( Aorus 1080ti ) / and there has been an explosion of three resistors , and i really need help to find out the values of the
resistors / here some pictures

i really need to find the values of resistors so i can fix it by replacing new resistors with the same value and thanks

the name of the resistors is

2* R1631 1*R1631

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RazorWind

2[H]4U
Joined
Feb 11, 2001
Messages
4,006
There are two ways to figure out the values of those resistors without a schematic:

1. Get your hands on an undamaged, identical card, remove the corresponding parts, and measure them
2. Figure out what they do based on what they're connected to and then guess. You can sometimes figure this out just based on the datasheets for the ICs nearby. I'd say there's a good chance they're zero ohms, but that's just an (educated) guess. I'd need to have the card in my hands to look at to say for sure.

It should also be pointed out that if you're burning up resistors, you almost certainly have a short circuit in series with them somewhere, and just replacing the resistors won't fix the problem. So, you should obviously remove the remains of the old ones and clean up the pads.

Finally, don't even attempt this if you don't have access to a hot air rework station. Do not use a soldering iron. Do not attempt to use a heat gun. Do not attempt to use a torch.
 

cyclone3d

[H]F Junkie
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Aug 16, 2004
Messages
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Why "must" you have a hot air rework station? At least for those resistors anyway? I used to solder stuff that small with a cheap non-adjustable soldering iron.

Yes, a hot air rework station makes it a lot easier but it isn't absolutely necessary.

As for why they burnt... There is definitely something else that caused it. Most likely there is a something shorted such as a capacitor, diode, transistor, vrm, etc. Those resistors were just the weaker link so they fried first.
 

RazorWind

2[H]4U
Joined
Feb 11, 2001
Messages
4,006
Why "must" you have a hot air rework station? At least for those resistors anyway? I used to solder stuff that small with a cheap non-adjustable soldering iron.

Yes, a hot air rework station makes it a lot easier but it isn't absolutely necessary.

As for why they burnt... There is definitely something else that caused it. Most likely there is a something shorted such as a capacitor, diode, transistor, vrm, etc. Those resistors were just the weaker link so they fried first.
First, I 100% believe you. It is usually possible to replace the smaller 0402 or 0805 components with just a soldering iron. Use a fat enough tip that you can hit both ends at the same time, and it's not impossible, although I've always been surprised by how tough it is when I've tried it.

A hot air station is the right tool for this job though, and it dramatically reduces the risk of damaging the board itself. My personal email address is now out on the internet, attached to a few threads and Youtube videos I've made where I did this sort of thing, and I now have people come to me on a semi-regular basis asking for help, especially these days where a dead graphics card isn't something you can easily replace. In a substantial fraction of the cases, they've already attempted to remove components they think are failed, correctly or not, and have damaged the traces under them to the point that in addition to fixing whatever is wrong, they also need to repair the damage to the board itself. This makes what might have been an easy repair a difficult or impossible one.

Furthermore, as I said, the visible damage to Mustafa's card is probably not the only thing that's wrong with it. My guess would be that there is a transistor somewhere, most likely the high side in a buck converter, that has shorted its input (the drain) to the switch node (the source). There is no way you're removing and replacing that component with just a soldering iron. Or, at least, if you can demonstrate how you'd replace an SOP-8 or QFN-40 with just a soldering iron, I'll gladly eat my words.
 

cyclone3d

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I wouldn't ever try removing a high pin count chip with a soldering iron.

Only way I could think to do it without a hot air station would be to either cut the legs or break the package very carefully.... But just no
 

RazorWind

2[H]4U
Joined
Feb 11, 2001
Messages
4,006
I wouldn't ever try removing a high pin count chip with a soldering iron.

Only way I could think to do it without a hot air station would be to either cut the legs or break the package very carefully.... But just no
Edit: What the hell? It let me JUST quote you, without adding anything...

Anyway, my original point was just that most people screw it up when they try this with just a soldering iron - especially the average 25 watt Radio Shack type, which is like trying to carve a delicate bird sculture with a chainsaw. Especially right now, where you can't just replace a graphics card, it's better to get the proper tool and do it correctly, than make a rookie mistake and damage the board further.
 
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Mister E

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Sep 14, 2004
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Replacing the damaged parts is no guarantee that card is gonna be functional. Worth a shot though. 1080ti’s are still beasts.
 

cyclone3d

[H]F Junkie
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Messages
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Edit: What the hell? It let me JUST quote you, without adding anything...

Anyway, my original point was just that most people screw it up when they try this with just a soldering iron - especially the average 25 watt Radio Shack type, which is like trying to carve a delicate bird sculture with a chainsaw. Especially right now, where you can't just replace a graphics card, it's better to get the proper tool and do it correctly, than make a rookie mistake and damage the board further.

Yes, I know. I don't recommend doing stuff like that, especially if you haven't done a ton of soldering work before... I was just saying it is possible.

I started soldering stuff whn I was less than 12. My dad bought me my first multimeter kit when I was around 12... I think.

All we had as far as soldering equipment when I was growing up was a cheapo soldering iron and a plunger style solder sucker.

I didn't actually get a rework station till a couple years ago and I am now 42.

Makes a huge difference in being able to solder tiny stuff easily.
 
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