GTX 670 Unlocking

Sn0_Man

Gawd
Joined
Mar 23, 2012
Messages
778
Is it possible to unlock a 670 to a 680? I mean, they are the same silicon right?

Sure, the 670's are hypothetically the 680's that DIDN'T make the cut, so it shouldn't work, but I can't believe nobody has tried it. Especially people with 680 PCBs...
 

nascasho

Gawd
Joined
Aug 23, 2009
Messages
617
Last I checked I think the die is laser cut. Only benefit I see would be starting clock.
 

PhatalOne

Limp Gawd
Joined
Aug 3, 2005
Messages
205
I personally would not buy a 670 with the thought that I could get a 680 because of the following:

1.) GK104 yields are terrible.
2.) The GTX680 and GTX690 are relatively rare compared to the availability of the 670.
3.) Because of 1 & 2, the supply situation is nowhere near like what AMD had with the Radeon 6950/6970.
4.) I would assume the disabled part is fused off or laser cut.

If you buy a 670 I would say that you should be happy to get 90% of the performance of GTX 680 for 80% of the price. Even if they could be unlocked, you'd have better luck winning the lottery then finding a GTX680/690 bin chip on a 670 due to the well documented issues with manufacturing GK104.
 

Godmachine

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Apr 7, 2003
Messages
10,472
Not to mention if you overclock the GTX 670 you can get that 90 percent to just about 100.

I'm not going to bother waiting for the GTX 680 when I can get virtually the same performance for hundred dollars less and right now.
 

Cruiza

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Mar 17, 2008
Messages
1,701
I don't think it's possible to unlock any additional shader units or whatever, but I have read that some people flashed a 680 BIOS onto their 670 and recorded a performance increase.
 

Forceman

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Aug 7, 2005
Messages
9,243
Pretty sure Nvidia doesn't allow this - they fuse or cut the die, it's not just a BIOS change. And given the low stock situation of GTX 680s, I'm thinking any chip that could possibly work as a 680 would be sold as a 680.
 

USF-Nealio

Limp Gawd
Joined
Jan 18, 2012
Messages
373
I have a sneaking suspicion that the 670s have damaged cores much like the Phenom X3s did. NVidia, looking for a way to cut their losses, found a way to re-purpose all of the defective 680 and 690 GPUs by bypassing their damaged cores and selling them as lower cost alternative.
 

Sn0_Man

Gawd
Joined
Mar 23, 2012
Messages
778
Fair enough. If the cores are physically altered then that is that. I just hadn't seen any mention of it anywhere. I'll probably still try flashing my GigaByte 670 to the 680 bios to test performance but I'm not expecting much.
 
Joined
Jun 26, 2000
Messages
893
You will probably see better performance because of the higher power limit, voltage and clocks. But you could achieve the same thing by overclocking.
 

grambo

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Apr 10, 2011
Messages
1,170
Fair enough. If the cores are physically altered then that is that. I just hadn't seen any mention of it anywhere. I'll probably still try flashing my GigaByte 670 to the 680 bios to test performance but I'm not expecting much.

BIOS would just change the stock clock speeds would it not? Let us know how it goes. I'm curious if it enables a higher power target % or not and any other changes. Also I thought the Kepler BIOS were digitally signed? How do you get one?
 

RottenMutt

n00b
Joined
Apr 22, 2009
Messages
16
there are two types of 670's, one built on the 680 board and another built on a new board. the full length boards clock well.
the cores, unless part marked differently are not laser cut. it could be a resister on the circuit board or the bios could be programed to detect bad cores and disable them, but i bet the first.
we need side by side pictures of the full length 670 built on the 680 board and the 680 to see.
 
Top