Fake Fortnite Android Apps Spread Across Internet

DooKey

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Apr 25, 2001
Messages
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YouTube videos that link to scam versions of Fortnite for Android are causing lots of uninformed people to download the app and infect their device with malware. The fact that Google Play Store isn't hosting any of these Fortnite scam apps is the good news. However, these videos keep springing up and the malware version of Fortnite continues to spread. I know those of us here at the [H] won't fall for this, but some of your friends might and you need to warn them.

Talking about one particular fake app, Nathan Collier, an analyst from security firm Malwarebytes, said: "It's so realistic that some may recognise it from the Apple iOS version. By stealing the icon directly from Apple, how could it not look real?"
 
IMHO, generally it is a pretty good idea to just not install arbitrary software on any device, general purpose computing or mobile. All downloads are suspect unless they come from a major reliable source or official software/app store or repository.

Personally, i use Linux as my primary desktop OS. Here I only install software from the distributions official repositories through the package manager unless I am absolutely certain the software comes from a reliable source (Like HP's latest HPLIP drivers from the HP webpage, etc.)

In Windows (Which I exclusively use for games) I install trusted companies hardware drivers, Steam, games through steam and a few trusted overclocking tools I've used for years, and that's it. No random software tools ever.

On my mobile devices, if it isn't in the Play Store it doesn't get installed.

It just befuddles me how incredibly stupid the vast majority of users are who just download anything and install it without a second thought. In the grand scheme of things, unless it comes from a major publicly known corporation, a major well established open source project or a major software distribution platform (think steam, Apples App store, Google Play, Microsoft Store) just don't. The small little tools from independent developers/organizations/websites are probably the most sketchy, as you never know whats going on there.
 
1. Asset Flip
2. Call app 'ForkKnife'
3. ???
4. Profit

Optional - add spyware
 
Still all this hate on the iphone... yet another malware we get to blissfully ignore.
 
Still all this hate on the iphone... yet another malware we get to blissfully ignore.

Android is a more free platform than iOS. Freedom includes the freedom to do stupid shit (like install malware).

If you prefer the nanny-platform that is iOS, that's your choice, but it may not be for everyone, and certainly not for me.
 
Saw this on YT as a ad, took me to some other site so I didn't DL it, then checked the Play Store and it wasn't on there so I just reported the AD to YT.
 
my kid is a huge Fortnite fan, and he was falling for this. Fortunately he couldn't install it and asked me for help. I beat the hell out of him of course and then explained that it was a scam and just wait for the official reléase.. :D:D
 
Saw this on YT as a ad, took me to some other site so I didn't DL it, then checked the Play Store and it wasn't on there so I just reported the AD to YT.


This stuff bothers me. These social media companies need to be liable for the ads they host. IMHO a cross functional team of experts should have to review and approve every single ad before they go live.
 
In Windows (Which I exclusively use for games) I install trusted companies hardware drivers, Steam, games through steam and a few trusted overclocking tools I've used for years, and that's it. No random software tools ever.

You just have to do a little research. I've come across tons of Windows software I never heard of from web searches, I just check those things out first before installing. The same process would work in this case as quick web search would easily reveal the true nature of the "Fornite" Android app.
 
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