EPYC 72F3 vs 5800X

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Apr 22, 2011
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Viable competitor?
72F3 boosts to 4.1 but is it overclockable? Has 256MB L3 Cache vs 32MB on the 5800X.

What socket is it, anyone know?

EPYC 73F3 with 16 cores 256MB L3 Cache also looks tasty.
 

lopoetve

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Oct 11, 2001
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It's on SP3 - generally only server motherboards (and a couple of dedicated workstation boards). What's the use case? If you're thinking desktop, you'll be disappointed - likely no overclocking, the boards are finnicky and painful to work with unless used as a server, tend to have compatibility issues with normal desktop kit (like video cards and sound cards), and really aren't designed for anything EXCEPT a server.

I'll also add - it tends to be sold WITH the motherboard. Biggest vendors on that for white box space are ASRock Rack and SuperMicro - might see one from Gigabyte, Tyan, or ASUS (rare) too.

Unless you need an AI workstation - I wouldn't.
 

lopoetve

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Have a source or just assuming?
It's a server chip. Results on Epyc have... not been great for that from what I've seen, but it's also not something most people try (I looked around a bit before deciding to go with the SoC version a few months back - still haven't picked it up). Rome tended to be extremely expensive for folks even on the enthusiast spectrum (and this is from a guy with both a 10980XE and 3960X), and the motherboards (again) are shit for what you want to do. Basic things like getting a good 3d card to work with games is hit-or-miss, same for audio cards or consumer USB devices a lot of the time (outside a keyboard or mouse). They're not tested or supported for any of that, so there's no effort to try (doubly so when most of the CPUs have either been somewhat flawed (first gen Epyc), or extremely expensive (Zen2 Epyc)). This is where TR Pro and TR are supposed to live - why buy epyc when you can get one of those?

You can give it a shot, but you're going to have a really hard time getting anywhere - when the CPU costs $4000+ for most of them (the new, smaller socketed Epyc is relatively uncommon - most were 32C+ by design), no one put in the effort to figure out how to do any of that. Especially when you still had a server as a result - that sucked for anything on desktop.
 

kirbyrj

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Don't they make the Threadripper platform for what you're looking for? Seems like you'd get what you want unless you do something extremely cache intensive.
 

bwang

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Not what you want for a desktop - the 72F3 is 8 dies with one core per die, targeted at per-core-licensed database software that benefits from a huge cache. If you really want one, you can buy a 3990X, then disable all but one core per CCX for the same effect.
 

bobzdar

[H]ard|Gawd
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Jun 6, 2003
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1,835
Yeah, tr pro is a much better fit. Pretty much everything Epyc has but with chipset for connectivity and desktop/workstation use in mind. Only problem is you'll likely have to wait until the fall/winter for the zen3 version. If you don't need the 8 channel ram and can live with 'only' 64pcie lanes and 512GB ram, go threadripper. There's really no purpose for Epyc outside of servers now that TR pro is available.
 

mashie

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mashie

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Wow. Was way off. Didn’t think they were making competitors to the specialized xeons for amd
The speed optimized EPYC's were introduced a couple of months after the 7002 series launch and priced accordingly.
 

lopoetve

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Yeah, in my side of the world, the core count models matter - less so the specialized ones (those still tend to automatically fall to Intel).
 
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