Did I make a mistake buying the i7-8700?

zamardii12

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So, I don't want to overclock anything so I don't care about the K designation but I JUST got done putting my PC together (my 2080ti just arrived in the mail today) and I can't help but wonder whether I made a mistake putting in the 8700 into my computer instead of the 9700K. The computer is strictly for gaming and work, but I wanted to know if I were to sell my 8700 would the upgrade give me any sort of real-world differences?
 

Kardonxt

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If you are spending RTX 2080ti money it seems silly to get the 8700 and not the 9700k for the ~$100 price difference (given the 9700k gives you 2 more cores at almost the same clocks).

Whether you would notice a difference depends on your workloads. If it's too late to return the 8700 then I would just use the system and see if you are happy with it.
 

Lastan010

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if you were using a gtx 970 I would say its a good match, but for crying out loud you pairing the 8700 with a 2080ti? wth were you thinking.
 

bwang

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The -K is a substantially faster CPU in practice, because it has a virtually unlimited power cap. The normal models have to at least vaguely abide by their rated TDP (and I think the power limits are more locked down).
 

Armenius

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The -K is a substantially faster CPU in practice, because it has a virtually unlimited power cap. The normal models have to at least vaguely abide by their rated TDP (and I think the power limits are more locked down).
I don't know about now, but my 4770 was all too happy to use 140W during gaming sessions while its TDP was rated at 84W. I think for practical use there is going to be virtually no difference in performance between a -K and non-K SKU with current Intel products when not overclocked. The 8700 has a lower base clock, but hits nearly the same Boost clock as the 8700K, and with gaming there is never going to be a time when Boost is not being used unless you somehow manage to blow past the Tj Max.
 

cybereality

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I'm running a 8700K on a 2080 Ti machine. I think I made the right choice.

In my case, I'm overclocking and managed to get to 5.0 GHz. Not sure I would be able to do that on the 9700K, I may have just got lucky with this chip so I'm keeping it.
 

Nenu

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I'm running a 8700K on a 2080 Ti machine. I think I made the right choice.

In my case, I'm overclocking and managed to get to 5.0 GHz. Not sure I would be able to do that on the 9700K, I may have just got lucky with this chip so I'm keeping it.
You did good, the 9700K hardly clocks.
 

PhaseNoise

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The 8700[k] is still a very powerful processor, and has enough available parallelism for gaming and most consumer tasks.
 

ReaperX22

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I think your 8700 is fine. I can't see it being any type of bottleneck at all. And although 9700k has 2 extra cores, it has less overall threads. 8700 is a fine chip.
 

jamesv

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Mar 12, 2016
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I don’t need big overclocks but I always buy the S or non-K COUs and gladly accept the free 400MHz with a pinch of voltage.
I’m still running a couple 4790ks and a 4790. Thought by now the non k would be showing signs of aging by higher heat disappation or faster throttling.
Nothing.

I don’t need 6 or 8 cores.
my apps are dependent on single core speed so 4 serve me fine.

I’m hoping AMD has a Quad using X570 Chipset and PCI 4.0.
Whoever has the best single fore performance gets my money.
 

STEM

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So, I don't want to overclock anything so I don't care about the K designation but I JUST got done putting my PC together (my 2080ti just arrived in the mail today) and I can't help but wonder whether I made a mistake putting in the 8700 into my computer instead of the 9700K. The computer is strictly for gaming and work, but I wanted to know if I were to sell my 8700 would the upgrade give me any sort of real-world differences?
YES!
 

tangoseal

[H]F Junkie
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Dec 18, 2010
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So, I don't want to overclock anything so I don't care about the K designation but I JUST got done putting my PC together (my 2080ti just arrived in the mail today) and I can't help but wonder whether I made a mistake putting in the 8700 into my computer instead of the 9700K. The computer is strictly for gaming and work, but I wanted to know if I were to sell my 8700 would the upgrade give me any sort of real-world differences?
Well the 8700k is faster than the 9700k in productivity due to having 4 extra threads. Not sure about 8700 non k. There is proof via established benchmarks.
 

whateverer

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Well the 8700k is faster than the 9700k in productivity due to having 4 extra threads. Not sure about 8700 non k. There is proof via established benchmarks.

And the 8700 is almost identical in performance to the 8700k, if you don't use the stock cooler:

https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/intel-core-i7-8700-cpu-review,5638-9.html

Like the i5 8500 being within five percent of the 8600k, the same goes for the 8700 models.

I also agree that the 8700 is more future-proof for games than the 9700k, as it has more hardware threads (smoother performance when you have a lot of threads). That may be important when we get the new round of consoles, powered by 8c/16threads.

The processors have almost identical performance in productivity apps when you can max-out all 12 threads on the 8700k, and clock-for clock the gaming performance is identical. The 8700 just turbos a little slower than the 9700k.
 
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