Dewalt Xtreme Brushless 1/4 Impact driver combo. $30 off @Lowes=$89

EvilViking

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I was in the market for a small brushless impact for some car projects. Lowes had $30 off this combo kit (impact driver, bag, charger and 2 batteries) All for $89. DAMN good price. The tool alone is usually $90. Free shipping / Pickup.

Here
 
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RPKYGK

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I would very much recommend you spend $10 and get the real deal. Especially if you are starting out, don't corner yourself with the 12V line. You only get one battery but you also get 30% more impact force. I think Lowes site is not correct as it lists the impact force for the 12V at 200 in/lbs and I think its actually 950 or so. But the worst 20V is 1400 in/lbs.

https://www.lowes.com/pd/DEWALT-20-...d-Cordless-Impact-Driver-1-Battery/1000136219
 

EvilViking

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I would very much recommend you spend $10 and get the real deal. Especially if you are starting out, don't corner yourself with the 12V line. You only get one battery but you also get 30% more impact force. I think Lowes site is not correct as it lists the impact force for the 12V at 200 in/lbs and I think its actually 950 or so. But the worst 20V is 1400 in/lbs.

https://www.lowes.com/pd/DEWALT-20-...d-Cordless-Impact-Driver-1-Battery/1000136219


Ahhh man. I'm an idiot. In my haste i didn't even look at the 12v. ALL my other power tools are 20V max series. I thought I was swooping up 2 extra 20v max batteries. Guess I'm making a trip for a return.... Lol
 

bwang

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I think the point of the 12's is not that they cost less, but they are lighter and smaller - if you don't need the torque of the 20V tools the 12V tools will let you get the job done with less fatigue.
 

caw2007

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I've done a lot of work on a few different cars with my M12 Milwaukee impact.. They are light and provide plenty of torque. I replaced a sway bar last week
 

sfsuphysics

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I think the point of the 12's is not that they cost less, but they are lighter and smaller - if you don't need the torque of the 20V tools the 12V tools will let you get the job done with less fatigue.
The size of the battery is tied to capacity more so than voltage, at least with my Hitachi ones I have a couple thin battery packs that still put out 18v but for half as long hence half the weight (roughly). Conversely over seen "long lasting" 12v packs that were quite heavy
 
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Siriso

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Figured I'd chime in since I own and use both tools. The 12v gets more use because it's slightly lighter so I have it with me more often.
The torque difference between mine doesn't seem that dramatic despite the specs, but the battery life difference is huge. My 2Ah 12v runs empty long before my 2Ah 20v when driving 2" deck screws into cheap lumber. In practice, this isn't an issue often for me, but it's such a big difference that it's definitely worth noting.
 

Pyromaneyakk

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The 12v ones are great for light-duty work. I use my 12v DeWalts more than anything. I can't vouch for this particular tool since it wasn't on the market when I got mine but the "screwdriver" one is great. As mentioned batteries don't have super long life but they recharge very quickly so I've never found myself having to stop due to a low battery.
 

sfsuphysics

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yeah, good rule of thumb with cordless tools, make sure you always have a backup battery because LiIon won't tell you that you're running low by slowing down greatly like old NiCd did it just stops.
 

RPKYGK

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Honestly if you get fatigue using a consumer impact driver you need to hit the gym. My parents have the 12V it works for them. But the selection of 20V tools is so massive now. If you had told me 3 years ago there could be a cordless router that wasn't garbage I would have laughed. Now I have one and can't imagine using a cord, but only because I have 15 batteries and can now just buy bare tools. If you have future aspirations of renovations or major construction start with 20V.
 

FlawleZ

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I picked up the 24V Kobalt drill and impact earlier this year and they actually have quite impressive performance for the price. Plus the batteries are the most affordable.
 

EvilViking

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The 12v was delivered today. Went to Lowes to exchange for the 20v. They didn't show it in their system. The only 20v they had was $180. Found it on Homedepot website. Here

I want to keep all my tools the same with the 20v Max system
 
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Edgar

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Question. So I own a cheap IKEA drill. Should I consider getting this or regular drill. What’s the major diff between a drill and impact drill. I would be using it for house stuff. Nothing else.
 

sfsuphysics

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Question. So I own a cheap IKEA drill. Should I consider getting this or regular drill. What’s the major diff between a drill and impact drill. I would be using it for house stuff. Nothing else.
Does it do what you want? Is your drill usage very light? If either of those are yes then your Ikea drill is fine.

The major difference between the two is a drill will rotate, or try to, at a constant rate regardless of the ability to do so, what this means is it is great for drilling holes with bits but if using it to screw things together if the screw doesnt spin you may skip the drill bit out which can strip the screw head. An impact driver has one function and thats screwing things in, if it feels the screw is slowing in rotation a mechanism inside gives you a little extra burst of torque hitting inside the screw head which powers through... or snaps the screw head off.

So quick and easy, using as a screwdriver/wrench? Get an impact driver. Want to make holes? Get a drill.
 

Edgar

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My IKEA drill still is not strong enough to make a hole in drywall lol. I mostly would use it to screw stuff in. Help with mounting a tv. Stuff like that.
 

UltraTaco

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yeah, good rule of thumb with cordless tools, make sure you always have a backup battery because LiIon won't tell you that you're running low by slowing down greatly like old NiCd did it just stops.
Aye mate, because fully charged 3cell is about 12.6v and discharged is around 11v, hence power until death.

My mate uses that cheap harbor freight orange drill and he DIY vacuum cleaner cord mode, so range is about 20 ft. Hehehe😏never run out of juice. He swears by it.
 

AaronGant

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I was in the market for a small brushless impact for some car projects. Lowes had $30 off this combo kit (impact driver, bag, charger and 2 batteries) All for $89. DAMN good price. The tool alone is usually $90. Free shipping / Pickup.

Here

Is that even an impact? That link keeps taking me to a listing calling it a cordless screwdriver. I think it's just a driver. Am I wrong?
 

sfsuphysics

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My IKEA drill still is not strong enough to make a hole in drywall lol. I mostly would use it to screw stuff in. Help with mounting a tv. Stuff like that.
Dude why do you still have that drill then? :D

Dewalt makes hammer drills that are kind of an impact driver and drill in one. The hammer drill is just that, it bangs up and down while driving while the impact driver bangs in rotation.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/DEWALT-...less-Hammer-Drill-Tool-Only-DCD996B/206936571
Not quite, an impact driver makes a force perpendicular to the bit direction to get a spike of torque, a hammer drill adds force parallel to the bit which doesn't affect the torque at all, so if you're drilling through concrete or something and your bit hits a smooth rock (aggregate) instead of your bit just spinning and not doing anything it tries to physically pound through and break it, just in general with masonry bits you can't bite into what you're drilling so it just spins and you really need that thumping in the direction you're drilling to get into it.
 

RPKYGK

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I would watch channels like AVE if you have no tools. He takes apart tools and finds very surprising things. If I wasn't already waist deep into Dewalt I would have probably just bought the best tool for each task and lived with the batteries all being different. There are Harbor Freight tools that are just fine, including one that was actually a re-badged Fein that was $800 from them.
 

Wade88

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Yes, I used it to affix bolts from a fence post to a brick wall. By up and down I mean in a demonstration where your test article is on a table or something in front of you. This was bad description i do admit. I live in AR, if you try to explain this to not physics professors or phd candidates the way you did their eyes will glaze over.
 

Verge

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Yes, I used it to affix bolts from a fence post to a brick wall. By up and down I mean in a demonstration where your test article is on a table or something in front of you. This was bad description i do admit. I live in AR, if you try to explain this to not physics professors or phd candidates the way you did their eyes will glaze over.

just say it's got "get up" and the necks know what you mean
 

sfsuphysics

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I would watch channels like AVE if you have no tools. He takes apart tools and finds very surprising things. If I wasn't already waist deep into Dewalt I would have probably just bought the best tool for each task and lived with the batteries all being different. There are Harbor Freight tools that are just fine, including one that was actually a re-badged Fein that was $800 from them.
https://www.protoolreviews.com/news/power-tool-manufacturers-who-owns-them/43632/

Interesting bit about how few tool companies there really are, so not surprising to see similarities between tools of different cost.

Like no way I would go Black and Decker these days on any serious tool that I didnt consider disposable, but DeWalt? Yeah you definitely are paying a yellow tax, not to say they are made the exact same but dewalt is definitely a market symbol
 

bonehead123

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FYI, Makita, Bosch, Kobalt, and PorterGable also make some fine tools of this variety, although each brand has their own nice features and varying prices depending on when & where you get them...

However, I would steer clear of Ryobi, B&D, and any of the off-branded/knock-off stuff, thery are generally a good bit cheaper but have weaker motors, lame brushes, lower-quality batteries & chargers, and usually shorter warranties, and will not last nearly as long as the better ones....

Craftsman, which Lowes bought from Sears and used to be a great brand, sadly appears to have suffered from the cost-cutting scissors, and from what I have seen so far, should only be looked at for general homeowner use, but definitely NOT serious, heavy duty, construction or commercial uses...

Power tools are a good case for applying the old saying "you only get what you pay for" and also "pay me now, or pay me later" :)
 

Edgar

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Could that 20V dewalt be used to drill holes if need be? sorry if I'm really novice with power tools. Just don't know jack crap about them. Just want a decent all around house use drill.
 

Westwood

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Could that 20V dewalt be used to drill holes if need be? sorry if I'm really novice with power tools. Just don't know jack crap about them. Just want a decent all around house use drill.
impact != drill

impact gun is more for nuts and bolts. The chuck (the part the drill bit slides into) is different on an impact. For around the house stuff, the lower end is more than capable. porter cable, the green one that I forget the name of, etc. totally fine. I went with the expensive crap because I use it for shop and field work. I redecked a trailer with just one battery of my M18 Milwaukee which was nice. I had to install about forty self tapping bolts through a 2x6 and 1/4" steel. By the last bolt the gun was feeling it.

The big thing about the cordless stuff, is you get "locked in" buy that brand. So I'm stuck with Milwaukee M18 stuff. But that's fine by me. My tools get used just about every day.
 
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Craftsman, which Lowes bought from Sears and used to be a great brand, sadly appears to have suffered from the cost-cutting scissors, and from what I have seen so far, should only be looked at for general homeowner use, but definitely NOT serious, heavy duty, construction or commercial uses...

Some correction: Craftsman was bought by Stanley Black & Decker, and is sold through Lowes, Ace, etc. (though apparently not Home Depot).

Also, last I knew, as part of the sale of the brand, Sears maintained a license to continue using the name, and they still sell tools which are separate and not compatible with those made/sold by SB&D through other retail channels.

I'd agree that Craftsman, as made/sold through non-Sears channels, is probably fine for general home use (i.e., about the same level as Ryobi). I'd steer clear of the Sears-sourced stuff, if only because there's no telling if they'll be around for parts/warranty/etc.
 

Tengis

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Some correction: Craftsman was bought by Stanley Black & Decker, and is sold through Lowes, Ace, etc. (though apparently not Home Depot).

Also, last I knew, as part of the sale of the brand, Sears maintained a license to continue using the name, and they still sell tools which are separate and not compatible with those made/sold by SB&D through other retail channels.

I'd agree that Craftsman, as made/sold through non-Sears channels, is probably fine for general home use (i.e., about the same level as Ryobi). I'd steer clear of the Sears-sourced stuff, if only because there's no telling if they'll be around for parts/warranty/etc.

You can warranty all Craftsman stuff at Lowe's. I took a trashed 50 year old ratchet to Lowe's and got a nice brand new 80 tooth 🤷‍♂️
 
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You can warranty all Craftsman stuff at Lowe's. I took a trashed 50 year old ratchet to Lowe's and got a nice brand new 80 tooth 🤷‍♂️

That's good, but I'm assuming it only covers basic hand tools (i.e., the ones sold by Sears under their "lifetime warranty"). A lot of stuff, especially power tools, does not fall under that coverage.

For example: You buy a cordless drill from Sears, they go under, and you end up needing a replacement battery pack? You're SOL unless you're willing to try rebuilding the pack yourself.
 

bonehead123

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Some correction: Craftsman was bought by Stanley Black & Decker, and is sold through Lowes, Ace, etc. (though apparently not Home Depot).

Tru dat, I forgot about that little arrangement detail. And apparently part of that deal was that Home Despot would NEVER be allowed to sell craftsman stuff... which is the same type of deal that prevents Lowes from selling RIGID power tools....
 

chizow

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Is that even an impact? That link keeps taking me to a listing calling it a cordless screwdriver. I think it's just a driver. Am I wrong?
Yep he linked the screwdriver, the impact is $10 more.

My 2 cents is the 12v Xtreme lineup is nice to have around the house or in compact areas, but if you had to pick just a single lineup of tools and batteries go with the 20v XR.

That said, I do find myself using the 12v impact more than my DCF887 and I will probably grab the 12v screwdriver for the torque settings.
 

caw2007

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sfsuphysics

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Could that 20V dewalt be used to drill holes if need be? sorry if I'm really novice with power tools. Just don't know jack crap about them. Just want a decent all around house use drill.
I mean you could, but I wouldn't. They do sell drill bits that have the same connection part for an impact driver, but the thinner nature of most any drill compared to a driver bit will most likely end up snapping your drill bit unless you drill through really soft stuff.

The big thing about the cordless stuff, is you get "locked in" buy that brand. So I'm stuck with Milwaukee M18 stuff. But that's fine by me. My tools get used just about every day.
Not necessarily true. Certainly true if you buy tools without batteries, which some brands are easier to find than others. But many tools you buy come with a battery with them, so getting a couple different brands isn't necessarily a bad thing especially if you have 2 of one particular brand so you always have a backup battery. So use your M18 impact driver, and drill, but then if you get a cordless circular and reciprocating saw (why?) feel free to do DeWalt or some other 20+ volt brand. This doesn't mean buy 1 of every brand because yeah that will paint you into a corner. Of course one thing to think about is tools of the same voltage all use the same battery pack often, so if the connection point is similar (i.e. slide over vs. slide in) a handy individual can find which pins bring power and reuse them with other tools ... but yeah it will void your warranty :D
 

alaricljs

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And if you're not handy, they sell adapters. Of course being that this is about hand tools, how are you not handy?
 

sfsuphysics

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And if you're not handy, they sell adapters. Of course being that this is about hand tools, how are you not handy?
Technically electric drills arent "hand tools"

That said my grandfather was handy, he was a machinist but he knew fuckall about electrical, once used coax cable as a power cord "its has metal, it will carry power!"
 

Penguincomp

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Could that 20V dewalt be used to drill holes if need be? sorry if I'm really novice with power tools. Just don't know jack crap about them. Just want a decent all around house use drill.

Yes it can but get a drill. You don't need the hammer drill unless you are planning on drilling into concrete or tile. A normal drill would do. For home use I would suggest going with Rigid if you have a Home Depot close.

After burning out a couple of Dewalt drills at work, I gave up on Dewalt and am now all Milwaukee 18v and 12v. To this day, I don't use the impacts at all. My M12 screw gun does 90% of what everyone uses the impact for as well as drilling simple things like a pilot hole in wood, stainless steel or drywall. The problem with the impact is that unlike the drill setting on a drill, it stops when the bit/hole saw gets jammed. So it's not used generally for drilling.

And if anyone is interested, I have a bunch of Milwaukee M12 & a few M18 tools that are for sale. I've either upgraded to something else or don't use them (both impacts are on the sale list).
 

Edgar

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So after doing more research. Looks like I just need a simple drill driver. Can someone recommend a good one please. Not going to be used for advanced stuff. Simple stuff around the house.
 
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