ASUS CROSSHAIR VIII HERO (WI-FI) BIOS 1302

mda

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Mar 23, 2011
Messages
1,851
What's your feedback on this BIOS? Seems like ASUS has gone back to its stupid BIOS descriptions.
 

primetime

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Aug 17, 2005
Messages
6,587
Guess this means ROG CROSSHAIR VII HERO (WI-FI) should be getting update soon?
 

mda

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Mar 23, 2011
Messages
1,851
Hopefully but unlikely. Some of the ASUS X370/B350 boards don't even have the 1004B yet... and this includes the X370 STRIX which seems to be very very close to the X470 STRIX
 

kirbyrj

Fully [H]
Joined
Feb 1, 2005
Messages
26,113
Probably a week before I see the same one out for my Prime X570-Pro board.
 

erek

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Dec 19, 2005
Messages
5,534
AthlonXP mda

after Disabling the two Spread Spectrum options I could find, seems i've just now scored my highest Cinebench R15. Too many variables changed though for me to really give you an accurate response because i only just now learned about saving my BIOS settings profile!

1583596746228.png
 

kamikazi

Gawd
Joined
Jan 19, 2006
Messages
571
AthlonXP mda

after Disabling the two Spread Spectrum options I could find, seems i've just now scored my highest Cinebench R15. Too many variables changed though for me to really give you an accurate response because i only just now learned about saving my BIOS settings profile!

View attachment 228334
Reviving this old thread a bit. Disabling spread spectrum boosts your score? What does your R20 score look like?
 

Azrak

Gawd
Joined
Oct 4, 2015
Messages
943
Reviving this old thread a bit. Disabling spread spectrum boosts your score? What does your R20 score look like?
An old post from Anandtech in 2008 but still relevant today:
https://www.anandtech.com/show/2500/20 said:
Engineers, looking for a way to meet regulation, began using a method for limiting such interferences called spread spectrum clocking. Spread spectrum clocking causes the signal regulation circuit to slightly vary the frequency about the target frequency, effectively "spreading" the power over a somewhat larger frequency band. The method of operation can be used to control system output power below the FCC standard limits, allowing for a claim of full compliance.

As you can imagine, even the smallest variation in a clocking signal can be enough to create data transfer errors. The fundamentals of overclocking demand the cleanest, purest signal possible, which is why spread spectrum should always be disabled unless you have a good reason to enable it.
 

FaRKle0079

2[H]4U
Joined
Jan 11, 2005
Messages
2,660
Spread spectrum sets the bclk to 99.8MHz instead of 100MHz. When you disable it the bclk goes to 99.98MHz. Since the CPU freq is a function of the bclk * multiplier your core freq is a bit higher too with spread spectrum disabled.
 

kamikazi

Gawd
Joined
Jan 19, 2006
Messages
571
Spread spectrum sets the bclk to 99.8MHz instead of 100MHz. When you disable it the bclk goes to 99.98MHz. Since the CPU freq is a function of the bclk * multiplier your core freq is a bit higher too with spread spectrum disabled.
A Ha, I wondered what the reasoning behind 99.8 baseclock was. I think I'm going to go back into BIOS tonight and put everything back on auto except RAM timings and voltage and see what happens. The only problem I forsee is with SOC voltage. It tends not to boot with SOC below 1.1v from time to time.
 
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