Asrock b550 taichi can't install M2!

Florin22xxl

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Dec 9, 2011
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215
Bought the B550 taichi and WD sn750 black,but i can't install it!
The screws asrock provides are to small for the screw driver they include in the box,i literaly can't screw in the.M2!
I don't have a miniscule screwdriver for the screws they provide.
Can i even install my m2?
This is making me so mad i feel like returning the whole damn mainboard just for this stupid reason.
The screwdriver they provide is onlh good.for.removing the heatsinks on the M2 not screw in the m2!
 

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criccio

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First things first, that torx bit isn't going to work on that phillips screw. You'll also need to move the standoff from the looks of it. I have tiny screwdrivers so I never thought about it but yeah, if you don't have one that will fit, you have your two options.

I've never bought a motherboard that came with a screwdriver so I have no predetermined notion that it would be their responsibility to include one.
 
Last edited:

THUMPer

2[H]4U
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You need a small screw driver. And you need to move that silver stand off to the next hole on the right. The hole that is marked CT22.
 

Florin22xxl

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Dec 9, 2011
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You need a small screw driver. And you need to move that silver stand off to the next hole on the right. The hole that is marked CT22.
That silver standoff is for the M2 heatsink that comes on the motherboard.
Why just why would they.provide a screwdriver to remove M2 heatsink but nothing to screw in the actual M2...
 

criccio

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I think thinking about returning a motherboard because they didn't include a screwdriver (which has never been a normal thing in computing, you provide your own tools, always) is absolutely silly.
 

Florin22xxl

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I would probably use the other M.2 slot since it's the one connected to the CPU.
I was worried it woulnd't work since that one is PCI gen4 ,but the specifications says it supports also gen 3x4 which my M2 is actualy.
Gonna try it later and see if it works!
 
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I really wish they would come up with something better than those tiny screws, it really is a pita to try to take those out/install them.
 

Libnok

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I was worried it woulnd't work since that one is PCI gen4 ,but the specifications says it supports also gen 3x4 which my M2 is actualy.
Gonna try it later and see if it works!
I know you're frustrated, but you should just go out to the local hardware store and pick up a small driver kit. It sounds like you're new to computer building and having the right tool for the job will make life a lot easier in the long run. I know it may not be convenient to do so, but they will pay for themselves. Besides, moving the SSD to the other slot doesn't solve the small screw issue.
 

Libnok

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Hope it catches on, not sure who thought those things were a good idea during the design phase.
While I think the idea is interesting, I don't think we will see this go mainstream. The small screws may seem like a nuisance, and in a lot of ways they are, they are versatile, simple, cheap, effective. Asus is just trying to charge a premium on a minor convenience. It's not like most people will need to deal with these situations on regular basis and the people who do, have the right tools.
 
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While I think the idea is interesting, I don't think we will see this go mainstream. The small screws may seem like a nuisance, and in a lot of ways they are, they are versatile, simple, cheap, effective. Asus is just trying to charge a premium on a minor convenience. It's not like most people will need to deal with these situations on regular basis and the people who do, have the right tools.
I have the right tools, however that does not change the fact that these things are so tiny it's a pita to install/uninstall. I'm positive other board manufacturers could come up with better designs as well.
 

Nobu

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I have the right tools, however that does not change the fact that these things are so tiny it's a pita to install/uninstall. I'm positive other board manufacturers could come up with better designs as well.
Put a dot of loctite on your screwdriver tip and then put the screw on, let dry. Install m.2, then tilt screwdriver to break loctite. :D
 

Libnok

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Put a dot of loctite on your screwdriver tip and then put the screw on, let dry. Install m.2, then tilt screwdriver to break loctite. :D
This is an interesting trick, but I'd go with a magnetic tipped screwdriver. :)
 

Florin22xxl

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I know you're frustrated, but you should just go out to the local hardware store and pick up a small driver kit. It sounds like you're new to computer building and having the right tool for the job will make life a lot easier in the long run. I know it may not be convenient to do so, but they will pay for themselves. Besides, moving the SSD to the other slot doesn't solve the small screw issue.
I just didnt had a very small screwdriver,and this whole sittuation delayed my build 1 day. The screw for the M2 heatsink is bigger so they could have made a bigger screw where you use normal screwdrivers, the best would have been to include a tiny screwdriver for those tiny things.
Its my first M2 instalation 🙄
The first slot works without screwing in the M2, the M2 is secured with the left screw for the heatsink,it aligns excatly to the M2 secure point. (I just wasnt sure it was going to work in the pci gen 4 slot)

Rant over! 😆
 

lopoetve

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I have the right tools, however that does not change the fact that these things are so tiny it's a pita to install/uninstall. I'm positive other board manufacturers could come up with better designs as well.
I've currently got... ~looks around~ 10 M2 drives of various capabilities installed in the very room I'm in, and I'm about to add 5 more.

Exactly ONE manufacturer included a screwdriver for them - Asus, on a $800 motherboard (Zenith II Extreme Alpha). The rest - YOYO. I bought an install kit years ago with spare screws, standoffs, and a micro-driver just for it.

Hell, my x299 Designaire 10G (a $600 board) didn't include one.

Now, yeah - the screws are a pain in the ass, but if it's a bare M2? You just deal with the things. Carefully. Very. Very. Carefully.
 

Libnok

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I can understand your hesitance, but, for the most part, when you're talking about connectivity, the governing bodies do their best to make things backwards compatible. So unless there has been a physical change (i.e. USB C) they should all be interchangeable with little difference aside from performance being limited to the slower device. So, a gen3 NVME drive should have no issues with a gen4 interface. Of course, it's always a good idea to research compatibility to be certain.
 

doubletake

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The only compatibility concern with m.2 slots is if you have a B or M-key slot, but B-key slots aren't used for high-speed PCI-e storage.
 

pendragon1

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take a deep breath and then go to your local dollar store and buy some micro screw drivers. sounds like a you problem...
 

Libnok

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The only compatibility concern with m.2 slots is if you have a B or M-key slot, but B-key slots aren't used for high-speed PCI-e storage.
This is correct, just to clarify though, to my knowledge, any B type device can be safely inserted into an M type M.2 socket (barring length constraints). The implementation of the M.2 slot itself is dependent on the chipset and motherboard manufacturer. An M type NVME SSD has its controller on board, whereas a B type SATA SSD relies on the motherboard chipset. According to Asrock's spec sheet for the B550 Taichi, the second M.2 would be capable of supporting a either M or B type SSD. Of course SATA is slower than NVME.
 
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