Workaround for Missing Temp Headers on Z490 Aqua?

Namenick

n00b
Joined
Oct 10, 2020
Messages
4
Hi,

I've ordered the Aqua Z490; however, there are no temperature headers?! It seems this is common on ASRock, my last 4 boards were Asus.

Thing is, I want to do a custom loop, and there is no direct way of reading the water temperature. Another post talked about using an Arduino Uno to send the data to the board via RS232. AFAIK the z490 Aqua has no a coms port; at least, I can find no mention in the manual, so maybe it was a different Aqua they meant.

Given there is no way to get RS232 data into the Z490 Aqua, it would certainly be possible to get the Uno to output a fan frequency signal, dependent on water temperature. I'm not sure though, how useful that would be - Is it possible to use a fan input signal to control fan output, using a monitoring program?

Any other suggestions to what to do here would be great - I still can't believe that a MB that comes with an inbuilt monoblock has no capability to measure water temps.

Thanks.
 

Namenick

n00b
Joined
Oct 10, 2020
Messages
4
USB to COM adapter?
I do not think the Aqua z490 has a coms port - are you saying it does?

It does have a usb2 header, and I guess the Uno could connect to that. But if possible, I would like to keep it simple, and the simplest method I can think of is to input pulses to a fan header.
 

Meeho

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Aug 16, 2010
Messages
5,139
I do not think the Aqua z490 has a coms port - are you saying it does?

It does have a usb2 header, and I guess the Uno could connect to that. But if possible, I would like to keep it simple, and the simplest method I can think of is to input pulses to a fan header.
No, I was thinking about using something like this to get a COM port. Your temp->fan rpm idea could work, but I think it would require a custom software solution. At least I am not aware of any utility that could control one fan based on the rpm of another.
 

Ready4Dis

2[H]4U
Joined
Nov 4, 2015
Messages
2,354
No, I was thinking about using something like this to get a COM port. Your temp->fan rpm idea could work, but I think it would require a custom software solution. At least I am not aware of any utility that could control one fan based on the rpm of another.
Yup, workarounds... Fun times. This is why I had to write my own control software for my server... By default it ignored CPU temp while determining fan speeds and always runs faster than it has to just in case. I had to grab the cpu temp, then command the ipmi to change the fan speed. So much quieter and it ramps up/down with temperature, so it's nice.

Yes, he was probably talking about usb to serial (rs232) adapter. Just be careful that if it loses comms it doesn't cause overheating and notifies you and/or ramps fan speeds up or something as a safety measure.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Meeho
like this

Namenick

n00b
Joined
Oct 10, 2020
Messages
4
No, I was thinking about using something like this to get a COM port. Your temp->fan rpm idea could work, but I think it would require a custom software solution. At least I am not aware of any utility that could control one fan based on the rpm of another.
Ah, so you mean using the adapter to convert the Uno Coms to the MB USB header. But in that case the USB output from the Uno could be used directly. Do you think this would be picked up by a monitoring program, without having to code?
Thanks, also for your thoughts on controlling fans based on rpm input, I'd also thought it unlikely, but wondered how hard it would be to write a custom solution? Using c#/c++ .net, I do not know how easy it is to get the mb fan info, but I'm guessing it's not impossible.
Yup, workarounds... Fun times. This is why I had to write my own control software for my server... By default it ignored CPU temp while determining fan speeds and always runs faster than it has to just in case. I had to grab the cpu temp, then command the ipmi to change the fan speed. So much quieter and it ramps up/down with temperature, so it's nice.

Yes, he was probably talking about usb to serial (rs232) adapter. Just be careful that if it loses comms it doesn't cause overheating and notifies you and/or ramps fan speeds up or something as a safety measure.
That it true, but I guess using another monitoring prog. to kick in if the cpu/gpu temps go overboard, could be used as a backup safety measure. I guess it would be also possible to take another output from the Uno, which could trip a relay and turn the machine off at dangerously high water temps. The Aquaero has a built in relay to do that.

Anyway, it's not exactly critical; obviously 998 other Aqua users manage just fine:). I suppose they have to use cpu/gpu temps. to control the radiator fans.
 

Ready4Dis

2[H]4U
Joined
Nov 4, 2015
Messages
2,354
Can't you just buy a fan control unit to take the temperature input directly to control things and just have a connection to your PC to monitor things? Seems like the way most people would go about it unless you just like projects. I do, I have a bunch of spare arduinos and IC chips/components and a 3 axis desktop cnc for routing my own custom circuit boards, but I'm probably not the norm ;). I also program professionally so that's normally the easy part for me.
 

Meeho

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Aug 16, 2010
Messages
5,139
Ah, so you mean using the adapter to convert the Uno Coms to the MB USB header. But in that case the USB output from the Uno could be used directly. Do you think this would be picked up by a monitoring program, without having to code?
I didn't know Uno had a direct USB output.

I don't know if any fan controller software could read its output directly.
 

Namenick

n00b
Joined
Oct 10, 2020
Messages
4
Can't you just buy a fan control unit to take the temperature input directly to control things and just have a connection to your PC to monitor things? Seems like the way most people would go about it unless you just like projects. I do, I have a bunch of spare arduinos and IC chips/components and a 3 axis desktop cnc for routing my own custom circuit boards, but I'm probably not the norm ;). I also program professionally so that's normally the easy part for me.

I've already bought a fan controller, and I could use the Uno to control them - but getting an adjustable temp/speed curve requires a connection to the PC. It would seem, at this point, the best way is the Uno-USB. The negatives are: interfacing the USB input with a monitoring program; the board only has 2 USB2 ports, though I guess a USB3 header could also be used.

I've also tried with a CNC for laying tracks, but it was a disaster for very thin traces, though my CNC was a cheap import from China. IMHO, chemical is the only way to go. If I do do this, I'II anyway go with the Nano - way cheaper, and it also has USB capabilities.

I didn't know Uno had a direct USB output.

I don't know if any fan controller software could read its output directly.
Both Uno and Nano have a USB interface. But, as you say, if no existing control/monitor app can read it, it's back to square one.

Thanks for the inputs, I've got a much clearer picture of the problems now.
 

Ready4Dis

2[H]4U
Joined
Nov 4, 2015
Messages
2,354
I meant a programmable fan controller of sorts. I'm no huge into the scene so can't recommend but I thought they had some controllers that had temperature inputs and a usb connection to monitor/set/configure.

I have some uno's, but mostly I have nano's and even a few stm32 arm based boards as well (also small). It can be a pain getting the board/router dialed in for very small traces, but i normally prototype using DIP components. I haven't ordered custom boards, but that's on my list to do at some point. I'm not sure why it would need a PC connection, are you adjusting fan based on CPU temperature or water temperature? I thought most used just water temperature for fan speeds and either 100% pump speed or pump speed based on temperature differential from radiator(s)? Anyways, seems like an interesting project if you do decide to go that route. I would just utilize the USB 2 ports, USB 3 is a waste for something that doesn't need the bandwidth anyways. Most of the arduino boards have USB -> serial adapters built in so all you have to do is plug them in and install the usb/serial driver, then you can open the comm port in whatever you're using and communicate with it. Some advanced boards have actual USB implemented where you have to setup it up for a specific USB device type and write something to either utilize an existing interface or write custom drivers.

If you do decide to go this route and wanted a hand with anything, I'm always down to play around ;).
 

lopoetve

Fully [H]
Joined
Oct 11, 2001
Messages
30,124
I did this with a Commander pro (not the best, but easy) - uses an internal USB connector and controls from there.
 
Top