Windows 10 1909 to 20H2?

dpriest

Weaksauce
Joined
Nov 18, 2014
Messages
120
I am running Windows 10 1909 that I only use for video encoding/transcoding. I don't use Cortana, Edge or any other features in Win 10 and I use Firefox and Chrome as my browsers. I have the Threadripper 1950X overclocked to 4.0Ghz. Is there any compelling reason to upgrade? If so, I would format the drive and do a clean install to the new OS. I will upgrade if there are any new features that I might appreciate or if it will improve performance but I do not want any kind of degradation in my current performance.
 

pendragon1

Fully [H]
Joined
Oct 7, 2000
Messages
25,313
yes. new drivers need the new versions, for gpus at least. plus other features, tweaks and patches. idk if youll appreciate it but you should update...
 

Zepher

[H]ipster Replacement
Joined
Sep 29, 2001
Messages
18,159
I recently updated all my machines from 1909 to 20H2 and no performance degradation doing the upgrade.
I would upgrade, if you have performance issues, then do a fresh install.
 

AltTabbins

Fully [H]
Joined
Jul 29, 2005
Messages
20,184
I haven’t had any issues on our production or personal machines. Should be safe for now but always smart to make a backup.
 

bigdogchris

Fully [H]
Joined
Feb 19, 2008
Messages
18,285
I am running Windows 10 1909 that I only use for video encoding/transcoding. I don't use Cortana, Edge or any other features in Win 10 and I use Firefox and Chrome as my browsers. I have the Threadripper 1950X overclocked to 4.0Ghz. Is there any compelling reason to upgrade? If so, I would format the drive and do a clean install to the new OS. I will upgrade if there are any new features that I might appreciate or if it will improve performance but I do not want any kind of degradation in my current performance.
The primary reason to upgrade is that each build of 10 only has around 18 month lifecycle for patches. Eventually you'll have to update to continue receiving security updates.
 

GotNoRice

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Jul 11, 2001
Messages
10,020
I will upgrade if there are any new features that I might appreciate or if it will improve performance but I do not want any kind of degradation in my current performance.

Your performance should simply stay the same. It's not normal for there to be a "degradation" of performance when upgrading your OS. You should only stay on an old version if you have a very specific reason.

A few examples of rare situations where performance "degradation" might occur:

Software-based mitigations for hardware security vulnerabilities - mainly applies to older Intel chips at this point, but can result in a significant decrease in performance with those CPUs. Either way, the decrease in performance is the lesser evil compared to hanging a "Welcome in China!" sign on your computer.

Major OS upgrade (think XP to Vista) - Would only apply when the new version of an OS uses considerably more resources than it's predecessor. You might notice it if you were upgrading from Windows 7, but still unlikely, especially when you have cores to spare.

Ancient hardware that is no longer effectively supported by the new version of the OS. This would not apply to you as your hardware is not very old.

Software conflict - Some old software running on your computer doesn't behave properly with the new OS version.
 

Zepher

[H]ipster Replacement
Joined
Sep 29, 2001
Messages
18,159
Your performance should simply stay the same. It's not normal for there to be a "degradation" of performance when upgrading your OS. You should only stay on an old version if you have a very specific reason.

A few examples of rare situations where performance "degradation" might occur:

Software-based mitigations for hardware security vulnerabilities - mainly applies to older Intel chips at this point, but can result in a significant decrease in performance with those CPUs. Either way, the decrease in performance is the lesser evil compared to hanging a "Welcome in China!" sign on your computer.

Major OS upgrade (think XP to Vista) - Would only apply when the new version of an OS uses considerably more resources than it's predecessor. You might notice it if you were upgrading from Windows 7, but still unlikely, especially when you have cores to spare.

Ancient hardware that is no longer effectively supported by the new version of the OS. This would not apply to you as your hardware is not very old.

Software conflict - Some old software running on your computer doesn't behave properly with the new OS version.
I am running 20H2 on a 12 year old 775 board with a modded Xeon 4 core with 6GB of ram and it runs great.
 
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