What is the point of a NAS?

Discussion in 'SSDs & Data Storage' started by KazeoHin, Jun 1, 2017.

  1. brentsg

    brentsg [H]ard|Gawd

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    BRB, will be maintaining HUGE enterprise stuff that I'll stealth brag about in a consumer NAS thread later.
     
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  2. ND40oz

    ND40oz [H]ardForum Junkie

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    But that's not a file server either, that's an Enterprise Cluster that you have to buy from a vendor. You're not whiteboxing a scale-out storage cluster on your own, you're paying a company to design and support it for you.

    And QNAP does offer Enterprise products as well: https://www.qnap.com/en-us/product/items_by_series.php?CA=1
     
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  3. Ranulfo

    Ranulfo [H]ard|Gawd

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    That was similar to my original intention with a DS380, minus the raid card and only 4-6 drives at the start. Its not a horrible case given what it is, but I'd have paid $50 more ($200) for toolless bays with metal not plastic fronts. The noise levels still bother me and assembly is a pain with the hdd cage system, nature of itx though. That system isn't doing much due to my lazyness but I have a feeling it will end up in a spare node 304 I have with just 4-6 drives given the mobo I bought. The ATX version of the 380 looks similar in setup but likely easier to build in and deal with.

    A NAS would need a network, with it being wired in most cases. You'd get more advice starting your own thread.
     
  4. kdh

    kdh Gawd

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    OP never said if it was consumer or enterprise. Ive been asked the same question in enterprise meetings in the past by people who don't understand the concept.
     
  5. kdh

    kdh Gawd

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    Actually it is a filesystem. I'm sharing a common filesystem between Windows and Linux systems. In an enterprise environment, depending on your environment, it makes more sense to pay someone to build it out then to build it yourself.
     
  6. Bandalo

    Bandalo 2[H]4U

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    Large enterprise? Sure. A NAS probably isn't the best choice. For anything medium-business and down to simple home use, a NAS is a great choice.

    The point of my original question was to tell me what a "file server" (i.e., a single Windows Server or Linux box designed to serve as a network share drive) can do that a good NAS can't do. I was not asking for a comparison of $50k+ enterprise solutions to a desktop NAS.
     
  7. ND40oz

    ND40oz [H]ardForum Junkie

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    What is a file system? An EMC Isilon cluster is network attached storage that is scalable. It uses their FreeBSD based OneFS and it's not a traditional Linux or Windows File Server which is what we were comparing to a NAS.
     
  8. kdh

    kdh Gawd

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    NAS Solutions in the enterprise have their use. I currently use it to augment our backup solution. I also use it to share a common filesystem between windows and linux. Example, application uses windows, outputs data into some format into a Nas folder. The Database server is Linux, mounts the same folder and pulls in the data. No need for extra service accounts to do sftp/ftp transfers between system. Infosec loves that. I'm also using it as a common repo for applications. At the end of the day, a Nas is a file server.

    I didn't see anywhere there was a budget limit on this post and OPs original post didn't say anything about consumer vs enterprise.
     
  9. kdh

    kdh Gawd

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    OPS orginal post..

    My response was based of this post.. He asked why someone would choose a Nas over a traditional filesystem.. I responded with why I would choose as a NAS over a traditional fileserver. Not a lot of context in OPs post.. So I posted my response based on my daily job.

    I'm not wrong, either are you, or either is the OPS question. Lots of ways to do the same thing. We all just have different views on how to do it.
     
  10. Bandalo

    Bandalo 2[H]4U

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    I think we're getting a bit off track on my point. The person I was responding to described a NAS as a "watered down file server". I was asking them for what features a full Windows/Linux file server would offer that weren't available on a good NAS. The point of my question was really to point out how capable Synology/QNAP NAS software really is these days, and how it can really handle just about everything for a medium/small business. It's not going to handle businesses that are computing-focused, but it's more than enough to handle simple mail duties, file sharing (permissions, quotas, backups, remote access, etc), and a host of other tasks. That being said, they ARE a small device, and generally not rocking super powerful CPUs and loads of RAM. But for a 10-25 person office at a law firm? Or a doctor's office? Probably an ideal solution.
     
  11. kdh

    kdh Gawd

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    Yeaaaa.. we kinda drifted a bit. You are totally right with that thought process. There are a million different ways to do the same thing, just depends on the goal, budget, environment and expected out come. So I totally get where you are coming from.
     
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  12. Gasaraki_

    Gasaraki_ Gawd

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    I don't get this question. Network attached storage is shared storage. It's like why do companies use SANs instead of all local storage.

    SANs/NASs give you redundancy, shared storage, dedicated cooling, storage management, lower power usage than a computer, etc.
     
  13. rtangwai

    rtangwai [H]ard|Gawd

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    The title is wrong - the actual question was "What is the point of the expensive pre-built self-contained NAS's when you can build a cheap file server?".
     
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  14. kdh

    kdh Gawd

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    That's an easy question to answer.. Not everyone wants to build and support their own one off solution. There are plenty of reasons behind that answer, and most of them depend on use case, support options, and budget.
     
  15. Shotglass01

    Shotglass01 [H]ard|Gawd

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  16. pipati

    pipati n00b

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  17. Orddie

    Orddie 2[H]4U

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    to bad all my stuff needs intel verse AMD