What exactly does 1:1 scaling mean?

geepondy

n00b
Joined
Dec 26, 2009
Messages
33
Reviews of the Dell 2209WA state that it's disappointed this monitor does not have this feature. What exactly is meant by 1:1 scaling?
 

wagsrules

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Aug 18, 2006
Messages
1,063
It means that at any resolution less than native it will stretch it to fit the screen and not map it 1:1 with its orginal resolution with black bars. Not explained very good but hope this helps.
 

Diverge

Gawd
Joined
Nov 22, 2005
Messages
542
Another way to put it is:

If you have your monitor set to 1:1, and it's max resolution is 1920 x 1600, and you change the resoultion to 800 x 600, basically you'll have a small 800 x 600 area displaying your graphics, surrounded by all black. think of a big black box with a little square in the middle.

If you didn't have 1:1 set, it would stretch the 800 x 600 image to fit the screen, making huge pixelated images.
 

CutterX

Weaksauce
Joined
Feb 3, 2009
Messages
108
It's a way to avoid ugly interpolation and stretching when the source's resolution (i.e. a console or a DVD player) is lower than the screen's native resolution.
With 1:1 scaling, 1 image pixel = 1 screen pixel.

This feature is useful when the screen is plugged to something else than a computer. On computers, graphics drivers may emulate 1:1 scaling by adding black pixels around the picture.
 

Mr_Coffee

Weaksauce
Joined
Oct 20, 2009
Messages
78
Since an LCD is essentially a grid of pixels it's resolution never changes. If you want to display an image with a lower resolution than the screen you typically have two options, 1:1 or a scaling algorithm. The benefit of 1:1 scaling is that each pixel of the input is paired with a pixel on the screen, giving you a 'perfect' representation of whatever it is you want to display. Scaling allows you to display the image using the entire screen but the result is only an approximation of the original.

Here is 1:1

11.png


And here is the image scaled up using a bi-cubic algorithm. (best case scenario)

bicubic.png


And lastly the small version for kicks.

small.png
 

geepondy

n00b
Joined
Dec 26, 2009
Messages
33
So is this really a big deal for computer use only? For example when I play a DVD thru the software DVD player such as Power DVD, when I enable "full screen" mode, it scales the movie up to fill the screen while maintaining the aspect ratio. Likewise when going full screen on an image using a graphics program such as Picasa or Adobe Elements (the two I usually use). This has all to do with the software and video card and has nothing to do any scaling features of the monitor, correct?
 

CutterX

Weaksauce
Joined
Feb 3, 2009
Messages
108
This has all to do with the software and video card and has nothing to do any scaling features of the monitor, correct?
What you're talking about has nothing to do with the monitor's features indeed, because it's done at the software level, before the video signal goes out of your video card.
 
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