Travel Camera Suggestions?

Mav451

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While I'm traditionally leary about travel zooms, it seems the 18-105 f4 in particular has fairly good reviews. Phoblographer had really great things to say, as did Rockwell. Really the only knock is the 427g weight, which is fair considering the focal length range.

Regarding 6500 vs 6300 - the 6500 only gets 2.5 stops with its IBIS, which isn't that impressive honestly.
 

///AMG

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Do y'all think 1650 is a good price for the A6500 and 18-105? Also hows B&H Photo? I might just go ahead and order it.
 

Anh N.

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BH is a reputable retailer. 1650 is decent price if you are getting them new. Can get cheaper if order used.
 

northrop

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BHPhoto > every other online retailer. Just about every photo gear I bought came from them. Adorama is another good one.

Price seems reasonable for that kit, albeit a little high when compared to other alternatives (ie, Nikon D7500 + 18-140 for $1500), but that's for a DSLR. For mirrorless, I think it's good.
 

Mav451

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Yup I see a $738 (8+ condition) and $765 (9 condition) listings for A6300; while the used A6500 is starting at $1080. All three of these come with the 16-50 kit. Looking at Keh or Adorama, I'm not seeing a cheaper body-only listing for the 6300.

As for the lens, both Keh and Adorama have a $499 used listing for the 18-105.

So we're looking at something like $1,237 for body and lens if you go that route.
 

northrop

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Congrats! Keep us posted, and if you run into any issues, let us know.... and happy shooting :)
 

///AMG

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Congrats! Keep us posted, and if you run into any issues, let us know.... and happy shooting :)
Thanks, It will be here Thursday hopefully. Ill spend some time to set it up and practice and let you guys know. If I really get into photography I might actually spend more.
 

///AMG

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So I bought the ravpower 2 battery pack with charger and a screen protector. Is there anything you guys recommend for travel while I'm at it? I was thinking about one of those bendy tripod things I see so much on youtube.
 

UnknownSouljer

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A lot happened here since I last posted. To just reiterate, most people don't care about the IBIS or touch screen that the 6500 has over the 6300. Save the money if you don't need those features. Also, Sony in their infinite wisdom hasn't figured out a way to allow OSS to work in tandem with IBIS (like on Panasonic). So if you get lenses with OSS, you don't need the IBIS anyway. It is only is a feature that matters if you're adapting lenses generally. But I doubt you'll do that, so don't worry about it.

The 18-105mm is great. I can speak first hand on it (as I own it and use it frequently for video). It's definitely a lens you can use on the camera all day without ever needing to switch. The weight to me isn't bad on it, but then you're speaking to someone whose first expensive camera was a 5d2 with a grip and the 24-70mm f/2.8L... which doesn't get much heavier (unless you're putting a longer lens on it). Still, I use the a6500 and the 18-105mm with a rode mic on a gimbal frequently and I would consider it still to be a very light weight setup.

I also have Ravpower batteries with the Ravpower dual chargers (that charge via USB). I'd highly recommend you get 6-8 batteries in total. Which I know might sound excessive, but if you're going to shoot with any regularity, you'll find that the camera just chews through batteries. Expect about 1 hour of on time. And every time you turn off and then on the camera again, it will eat through 3-5%. It sounds like I'm joking, but I'm not. It was/is one of the most frequently complained about problems with this camera (which is why they finally rectified it on the A7III and A7RIII with a battery pack 3 times the size).

Alternatively if you don't want to buy that many batteries for the camera, you can "always be charging" [ABC] by bringing a mobile battery bank (I use an Anker 20100 mah battery). And plug the Ravpower USB dual charger into that, and simply charge the batteries you have as you use them throughout the day. It will take roughly 1.5-2 hours to charge 2 batteries using this mobile setup, which is sufficient generally with 3-4 batteries. Then of course charge all your batteries including the Powerbank at night (make sure to have a high amperage charger for the powerbank). It does have the bonus that if you already happen to own a powerbank, then you don't have to buy anything. And if you were going to carry it anyway to charge your phone(s) while mobile on the trip, then there is no difference to you in terms of carry weight.

Either method will require you to carry more stuff (unless you were going to anyway in the case of the powerbank). But I find I generally can't get around on any sort of trip without a backpack of some kind. Other people like to travel and move a bit more light.

I personally use both methods. I have 11 batteries and 3 chargers (allowing the charging of 6 batteries). That is probably excessive for you, so using either one method or the other will probably be sufficient.
 
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///AMG

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I personally use both methods. I have 11 batteries and 3 chargers (allowing the charging of 6 batteries). That is probably excessive for you, so using either one method or the other will probably be sufficient.
I guess Ill buy 2 or 4 more batteries, I have 4 so far so I will have to see. I plan on using a powebank to charge as well. I dont know if I will get the Anker or Ravpower PD one yet.
 

UnknownSouljer

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I guess Ill buy 2 or 4 more batteries, I have 4 so far so I will have to see. I plan on using a powebank to charge as well. I dont know if I will get the Anker or Ravpower PD one yet.
Anker for sure is my go to brand for a lot of, if not most things involving mobile power. I have two different sized Powerbanks, a 6 port USB charging hub (this purchase has made my life so much easier), and numerous cables from them. They aren't the cheapest by a long shot, but I'd say they're probably the best. If anyone beats them it's generally an OEM and not another third party.
 

///AMG

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Anker for sure is my go to brand for a lot of, if not most things involving mobile power. I have two different sized Powerbanks, a 6 port USB charging hub (this purchase has made my life so much easier), and numerous cables from them. They aren't the cheapest by a long shot, but I'd say they're probably the best. If anyone beats them it's generally an OEM and not another third party.
problem is I have dealt with both and have had both anker and ravpower fail on me numerous times. Both have been really good with warranty though, but ravpower has 36 month vs 18 for anker and the price difference is pretty significant.
 

UnknownSouljer

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problem is I have dealt with both and have had both anker and ravpower fail on me numerous times. Both have been really good with warranty though, but ravpower has 36 month vs 18 for anker and the price difference is pretty significant.
Wow. I'd say you're pretty unlucky then. I've had no Anker failures over multiple years. And 1 out of my 6x Ravpower batteries was DOA. To Ravpower's credit though, they did take care of me.
 

///AMG

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Wow. I'd say you're pretty unlucky then. I've had no Anker failures over multiple years. And 1 out of my 6x Ravpower batteries was DOA. To Ravpower's credit though, they did take care of me.
I guess, I dont mind unless they dont honor warranty. Though it would suck if it failed during the trip.
 

///AMG

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I came home early today to sign for it. So far I have unboxed it and taken a few pictures in auto to play around. The lens is quite hefty.
 

Mav451

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Hah I mentioned the 427g of weight earlier. Though to be fair, for the APS-C world it's still pretty light-weight.
But if weight was at all a concern, I would've recommended/campaigned for a m43 purchase instead :p
 

///AMG

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Hah I mentioned the 427g of weight earlier. Though to be fair, for the APS-C world it's still pretty light-weight.
But if weight was at all a concern, I would've recommended/campaigned for a m43 purchase instead :p
Ill see, Im just not used to anything heavier than a phone lol. It is lighter and smaller than my Brother in Laws Canon so at least I have that going for me. Though just setting up some settings and taking 15 pictures or so drained the battery to 70% which is crazy. Ill need to get 2 more batteries at least, they seem to take 2 hrs or so to charge.
 

IdiotInCharge

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Ill see, Im just not used to anything heavier than a phone lol. It is lighter and smaller than my Brother in Laws Canon so at least I have that going for me. Though just setting up some settings and taking 15 pictures or so drained the battery to 70% which is crazy. Ill need to get 2 more batteries at least, they seem to take 2 hrs or so to charge.
The screen and anything wireless will eat battery life. This is true for DSLRs which can get 2000 shots per charge- but they don't need any power to compose the shot and very little to focus relative to mirrorless cameras. But they're also larger and more limited in some functionality :).

Recommend turning the review time after shots down, and setting the camera to its equivalent of airplane mode.
 

UnknownSouljer

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Considering the focal range, the 18-105 is pretty light. All things considered as they say.

Also, I tried to warn you about the batteries. Seeing is believing though.
 

///AMG

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Considering the focal range, the 18-105 is pretty light. All things considered as they say.

Also, I tried to warn you about the batteries. Seeing is believing though.
Indeed. I like it so far. I've been testing things out and seeing what does what. Saw ebay had a 15% off coupon (up to $50) and almost convinced myself to buy a Sigma Prime lens. Then I thought I don't even have enough experience with focal lengths to understand which one I would even like.
 

IdiotInCharge

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Indeed. I like it so far. I've been testing things out and seeing what does what. Saw ebay had a 15% off coupon (up to $50) and almost convinced myself to buy a Sigma Prime lens. Then I thought I don't even have enough experience with focal lengths to understand which one I would even like.
I have a stack of cheaper ones (along with my cheaper zooms), and generally speaking prime lenses can offer lower size and weight, better image quality, special effects...

Your zoom actually covers almost every useful focal length; going wider (sub 18mm) would be desirable for landscapes/interiors/dramatic closeups, while going longer would be useful for wildlife. Both would be better served with zooms, though.

Duplicating focal lengths with primes for lens speed (wider apertures) can help keep noise down in lower light, which is especially useful when shooting things that move (like people!), and for that something in the *normal range is usually useful. Sony's 35/1.8 OSS serves that purpose pretty well, alongside Sigma's larger 30/1.4 E-mount lens.


*[the normal range is from about 35mm to 60mm on full-frame, or ~23mm to ~40mm on APS-C; 50mm prime lenses on full-frame are generally considered to be 'normal' primes]
 

///AMG

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I have a stack of cheaper ones (along with my cheaper zooms), and generally speaking prime lenses can offer lower size and weight, better image quality, special effects...

Your zoom actually covers almost every useful focal length; going wider (sub 18mm) would be desirable for landscapes/interiors/dramatic closeups, while going longer would be useful for wildlife. Both would be better served with zooms, though.

Duplicating focal lengths with primes for lens speed (wider apertures) can help keep noise down in lower light, which is especially useful when shooting things that move (like people!), and for that something in the *normal range is usually useful. Sony's 35/1.8 OSS serves that purpose pretty well, alongside Sigma's larger 30/1.4 E-mount lens.


*[the normal range is from about 35mm to 60mm on full-frame, or ~23mm to ~40mm on APS-C; 50mm prime lenses on full-frame are generally considered to be 'normal' primes]
Thats a pretty good explanation. I am actually thinking about getting the DJI Mavic Pro as well, but some of the countries I am visiting dont quite allow it.
 

///AMG

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Did a bit of shooting around the neighborhood and man the only real issue I have is trying to balance the Camera. The weight is quite far forward, makes me tilt it too much because of the lens.
 

UnknownSouljer

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Did a bit of shooting around the neighborhood and man the only real issue I have is trying to balance the Camera. The weight is quite far forward, makes me tilt it too much because of the lens.
Weird. Never felt this way. But I think that perhaps has to do with the fact that I've more or less always had the smallrig cage with grip on it.

As for primes, it's hard to explain what to get and why, and honestly the choice.... isn't arbitrary... as much as it's preference. For travel unless you're an experienced shooter with at least a good amount of experience with a particular focal length and are comfortable, then it's lack of versatility feels hampering. I talked a little bit about that earlier. If you really were okay with that route, I probably would have pushed the X100F harder. As a single focal length camera for travel that is light weight and has excellent controls, it's hard to beat it.

Most people prefer full frame equivalent 50mm. But honestly for travel I dislike 50mm. I prefer 28mm or 35mm. I actually have a pretty strong preference for specifically that 28mm focal length in general.
I find 50mm great for street photography, but travel I often find that it isn't wide enough to get any large structure in frame. Whether natural or architectural. And for anything interior, I definitely prefer wide angle over the narrow 50mm. I visited Versailles a little over a month ago, and it would be impossible to get any of those ceilings in frame on a 50mm.
Now that isn't to say that would be bad, a dedicated 50mm shooter would simply create frames that showed the part of the ceiling they liked most, rather than trying to frame it all. And that is the trick with primes. It's about using the strengths of your limitation, rather than allowing your limitation to limit you. Which I realize sounds redundant or confusing, but it isn't.

28mm FF is roughly 18mm on crop (which is the wide end of the 18-105mm you have).
35mm FF is roughly 23mm on crop.

To test what you like, you could choose a focal length on your zoom you want to test, and try shooting with just that one focal length all day (making a day out of it. Perhaps traveling to some place local and giving it a test with a real world scenario). It's kind of annoying to do that though on the 18-105mm, because every time the camera turns off, it resets back to its widest setting. Which if you're trying to test 28mm (18mm), that's fine, but if you're trying to test what 35mm or 50mm is like, you'd have to try and reselect that every time.

I suppose as one other hypothetical, if I only had one prime lens and that was all I had, I'd probably settle on 35mm. Take that with a grain of salt. Like I say, focal length is heavily based on preference and also your subject. IdiotinCharge touched on subject matter playing a big roll and that is also true.

===

I own a Mavic Pro. Fantastic drone but flight takes time to learn (well, all drones do, not that one in particular). Especially if you want to do it safely and adhere to FAA guidelines (and you do for the safety of others, which I know doesn't sound cool. But if you're not, you're kind of a douche because you're putting other people at risk so you can have "a cool shot".) But you're right, a lot of places don't allow the flying of drones. Paris, it will get you arrested (illegal in the whole city without permit, and those are no joke to obtain). And Tokyo, basically the entire city is geofenced. Creating an international offense or incident is not something I'd recommend.
I'd highly recommend looking up relevant laws wherever you will be and not taking the risk. It's not worth it. I didn't bring my drone to Paris despite knowing it would get awesome killer shots, 'cause frankly if you read the news regarding drones and you feel the presence out there, you do not want to be on the wrong side of the law (they literally have people in the military armed with fully automatic FAMAS rifles patrolling the city especially major tourist sites in groups of 3). They aren't messing around. At the Eiffel Tower, after seeing my bag was full of camera equipment, the guy literally asked me and made sure I didn't have a drone. Whether that's an outside case or not, I'll let you decide. But security in Paris in general is really a lot of work. It's similar in a lot of ways to post 9/11 NYC. There's literally security to get into virtually any tourist site, including churches (like Notre Dame or the Sacre Coeur, etc).
 
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IdiotInCharge

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One thing about primes that you likely already have a feel for- your phone likely has a moderate wide-angle lens roughly equivalent to the field of view of your 18-105 at its wide end.

Also, if you're having trouble keeping the camera steady, use the viewfinder and treat it like a rifle, from stance to elbows etc. The IBIS and OSS can only do so much.
 

///AMG

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SNIP

===

I own a Mavic Pro. Fantastic drone but flight takes time to learn (well, all drones do, not that one in particular). Especially if you want to do it safely and adhere to FAA guidelines (and you do for the safety of others, which I know doesn't sound cool. But if you're not, you're kind of a douche because you're putting other people at risk so you can have "a cool shot".) But you're right, a lot of places don't allow the flying of drones. Paris, it will get you arrested (illegal in the whole city without permit, and those are no joke to obtain). And Tokyo, basically the entire city is geofenced. Creating an international offense or incident is not something I'd recommend.
I'd highly recommend looking up relevant laws wherever you will be and not taking the risk. It's not worth it. I didn't bring my drone to Paris despite knowing it would get awesome killer shots, 'cause frankly if you read the news regarding drones and you feel the presence out there, you do not want to be on the wrong side of the law (they literally have people in the military armed with fully automatic FAMAS rifles patrolling the city especially major tourist sites in groups of 3). They aren't messing around. At the Eiffel Tower, after seeing my bag was full of camera equipment, the guy literally asked me and made sure I didn't have a drone. Whether that's an outside case or not, I'll let you decide. But security in Paris in general is really a lot of work. It's similar in a lot of ways to post 9/11 NYC. There's literally security to get into virtually any tourist site, including churches (like Notre Dame or the Sacre Coeur, etc).
Yea, I used to fly and build my own drones in College, also 3D helicopters. But I havent flown any in years, but Im basically going to Vietnam (its hit or miss for drones here), Philippines (they allow with registration), Thailand (hit or miss) and China which I havent looked up yet. So I probably won't end up getting one.
 

UnknownSouljer

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How has the setup
Yea, I used to fly and build my own drones in College, also 3D helicopters. But I havent flown any in years, but Im basically going to Vietnam (its hit or miss for drones here), Philippines (they allow with registration), Thailand (hit or miss) and China which I havent looked up yet. So I probably won't end up getting one.
Two things: 1: I'm sort of surprised about the issues in SEA. I would imagine a lot of places in Vietnam you could "get away with it" as it's kind of the wild west in a lot of ways in terms of laws. I lived there for a year (this was all pre-consumer drone though) and basically the cops on the street wouldn't bother to stop foreigners for most anything. As getting into an incident with an American citizen was looked at as possibly an opportunity for bad press (I found that generally the reasons for doing or not doing a lot of things there came down to politics and perception). Now, I can't say for sure, but I would imagine there is a big difference between "what is law" and "what is actually enforced". Once again, I'd play it safe. But so many places in Vietnam are rural, and if you're adhering to FAA guidelines, you're likely not going to bother anyone, and they're likely not going to bother you. (As a side note, I miss Da Nang a lot! If you spend time in central Vietnam, I have places to recommend going to. As well as some of my favorite spots in northern Vietnam).

I sort of figure that the rest of the SEA countries are the same. As for China, you'd probably be okay outside of major cities. Or only flying over water etc if you're in a major city. So, it still might be worth it.

And 2!: How is the camera working out for you thus far? Feel like you've figured out some more things?
 

///AMG

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How has the setup


Two things: 1: I'm sort of surprised about the issues in SEA. I would imagine a lot of places in Vietnam you could "get away with it" as it's kind of the wild west in a lot of ways in terms of laws. I lived there for a year (this was all pre-consumer drone though) and basically the cops on the street wouldn't bother to stop foreigners for most anything. As getting into an incident with an American citizen was looked at as possibly an opportunity for bad press (I found that generally the reasons for doing or not doing a lot of things there came down to politics and perception). Now, I can't say for sure, but I would imagine there is a big difference between "what is law" and "what is actually enforced". Once again, I'd play it safe. But so many places in Vietnam are rural, and if you're adhering to FAA guidelines, you're likely not going to bother anyone, and they're likely not going to bother you. (As a side note, I miss Da Nang a lot! If you spend time in central Vietnam, I have places to recommend going to. As well as some of my favorite spots in northern Vietnam).

I sort of figure that the rest of the SEA countries are the same. As for China, you'd probably be okay outside of major cities. Or only flying over water etc if you're in a major city. So, it still might be worth it.

And 2!: How is the camera working out for you thus far? Feel like you've figured out some more things?
Well I don’t know if want to take the chance with a drone that cost 1k. So I would have to be sure it won’t be taken at customs or I would be fined.

2: cameras been great. I’ve been trying to figure out the exposure triangle and using the histogram to help me. I have a question though, the lens I bought is a constant aperture lens so does changing the aperture on the camera do anything?
 

IdiotInCharge

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I have a question though, the lens I bought is a constant aperture lens so does changing the aperture on the camera do anything?
Yes!

There should be a button that stops down the lens (I don't speak Sony, yet), that will allow you to see the aperture stop down. The 'constant aperture' is 'constant maximum aperture', meaning that as you zoom in (increasing focal length/tighter field of view) the diaphragm opens up to keep the f-stop (ratio between entrance pupil diameter and focal length) constant.

This is in comparison to variable aperture zooms, which are most of them/most of the cheaper ones, where the diaphragm remains (more or less) constant in size which means that as focal length increases, f-stop decreases, so you see lenses that go from f/3.5 on the wide end down to f/5.6 on the long end, as a common example.
 

///AMG

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Yes!

There should be a button that stops down the lens (I don't speak Sony, yet), that will allow you to see the aperture stop down. The 'constant aperture' is 'constant maximum aperture', meaning that as you zoom in (increasing focal length/tighter field of view) the diaphragm opens up to keep the f-stop (ratio between entrance pupil diameter and focal length) constant.

This is in comparison to variable aperture zooms, which are most of them/most of the cheaper ones, where the diaphragm remains (more or less) constant in size which means that as focal length increases, f-stop decreases, so you see lenses that go from f/3.5 on the wide end down to f/5.6 on the long end, as a common example.
Ah, thanks for the explanation.

Aperture changes the depth of field.

View attachment 71618

https://www.exposureguide.com/focusing-basics/

So adjust the aperture based on the type of photography that you do. Typically, for landscape work, I keep it in f8-10 range.
Just in time, I'm about to take some landscape pictures tomorrow.
 

IdiotInCharge

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Set the camera to 'A', lock the aperture to f/8 and ISO to 100, focus 1/3 of the way into the composition...

...took me years to get that down.
 

northrop

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Let me rephrase my above statement. Select the aperture based on the effect that you want to achieve, not the type of photography performed.

There's no rule that you must use f8-10 for landscape work, just like there's no rule you need to always keep the aperture wide open for portraits. I simply choose to select these values to get the effect of having the most (all) landscape in focus.

I'm sure you've already read through the book I linked on the previous page (Understanding Exposure). It explains the subject of aperture in great detail, and how it affects your photography.

Set the camera to 'A', lock the aperture to f/8 and ISO to 100, focus 1/3 of the way into the composition...

...took me years to get that down.
ISO to 100-Auto if handheld... just sayin' ;)
 

northrop

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Correct!

Knew I was forgetting something- I made the assumption that the camera will be locked onto a tripod :D
Oh trust me, it took me far too long to figure that one out myself. :facepalm: Though, back in the glory days of my D80, I never used anything but ISO 100 on that thing anyway, and pretty much shot everything on a tripod, so the AUTO part didn't really matter much :p
 

capt_cope

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Set the camera to 'A', lock the aperture to f/8 and ISO to 100, focus 1/3 of the way into the composition...

...took me years to get that down.
Unless you don't have a tripod or it's not a cloudless sunny day...

Honestly, for run and gun shooting you'll want to stick with TV mode, given the focal range of your zoom lens, set your shutter speed to 1/250th of a sec. and call it a day. If TV mode doesn't set the ISO to auto for you, you should do that as well. Even hand-held, you'll get sharp photos at any zoom. IF you see a shot that really needs a shallow depth of field you can set the camera into manual mode, open that aperture to the max (f/4), set your shutter speed to at least double the focal length (if it's at 55mm your shutter speed should be 1/125th - unless your camera lets you use 1/110th) and then set your ISO to auto. Assuming there's a reasonable amount of light you should be in pretty good shape. IF it's too bright you can use a faster shutter speed.

If you want to go the other direction - more depth of field - set it to manual, set your aperture to f/8 (or a little smaller, but I personally avoid anything smaller than f/16 since most of my glass starts to lose sharpness at that point,) your shutter speed to at least double the focal length, and auto ISO. If the scene is too bright for ISO100 you can compensate by using a smaller aperture or a faster shutter speed.
 

IdiotInCharge

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Honestly, for run and gun shooting you'll want to stick with TV mode, given the focal range of your zoom lens, set your shutter speed to 1/250th of a sec. and call it a day.
I don't disagree with the basis of your comment, though I will point out that the post of mine you quoted was specifically for landscape shooting :).

Beyond that, the OP will rather quickly be introduced to the variances of exposure moving from sunny to cloudy to shade to indoor to night/low-light settings. While 1/250th is most certainly safe for stopping most subject movement, it is also a bit high and being 'safe' with a high exposure will also most certainly lead to excess noise as soon as light becomes less available.

On balance, I agree that it is a more foolproof way to start out and I agree with the rest of your post.
 

capt_cope

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I don't disagree with the basis of your comment, though I will point out that the post of mine you quoted was specifically for landscape shooting :).

Beyond that, the OP will rather quickly be introduced to the variances of exposure moving from sunny to cloudy to shade to indoor to night/low-light settings. While 1/250th is most certainly safe for stopping most subject movement, it is also a bit high and being 'safe' with a high exposure will also most certainly lead to excess noise as soon as light becomes less available.

On balance, I agree that it is a more foolproof way to start out and I agree with the rest of your post.
I think we agree with each other then.

I only intended my comment to apply if the OP isn't using a tripod and isn't yet comfortable with the variables of exposure and getting "sharp" focus. I do agree 1/250th can be limiting as far as exposure goes, but for someone just starting out I do think it's a bit "safer" than aperture priority considering the ridiculous low-light performance of most modern cameras. It's just one less thing to think about when you've got a zoom lens and are shooting without a tripod. "Back in MY day" ISO 6400 was as noisy as I was willing to get, now it seems like most half-decent cameras can produce roughly equivalent (as far as noise is concerned) images at ISO 25600 or higher. If I'm given the choice, I'll take noisy over "soft" images every day of the week - and in my experience you're likely to miss both noise and motion blur until you get back to a computer monitor (unless you're spending all your time staring at the back of your camera instead of shooting, which isn't a great habit to get into.)

But again, I'm not disagreeing with your point at all, my recommendation is pretty conservative, pointlessly so if you've got a tripod or never use a focal length past 85mm.
 

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[H]ard|Gawd
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I'd go one more bit of complication for sharp handheld. The formula I use is shutter speed = 1 / (2 x focal length), with a min of 80 so your 1/250 is fine for the 105 end, but a bit high at the 18 mm end of the focal length - this is without IS. With IS, can go to about 1/(1.5 times the focal length) or if you're really good or have really good IS, down to 1/focal length - with a min of 60. This lets you handle a bit less light without dealing with the higher ISOs.
 
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