TFT Technology Breakdown and Model/Panel Index

game14

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Nov 8, 2006
Messages
1,441
how do i know which panel in which monitor ??? doesnt say anything about panel type in product description or on manufacturer product page .
And sorry to say that but the list given in this thread doesnt seem to be much up too date anymore.:(
where can i get the information about which panel is used ???
 

jmsnyc

Weaksauce
Joined
Jun 2, 2008
Messages
97
I am upgrading from a really old 15" Sony SDM-M51 analog flat panel. Is there any way I can find out the screen technology. It is too old to be listed on the tftcentral site.
 

dssence

n00b
Joined
Jul 14, 2008
Messages
45
I'm about to buy a 32 inch LCD / TV I'm into the following models . I'm going to be using the TV for gaming, pc monitor and watching movies. I really matter about the whinning noises on crappy psu's that to take into consideration, I also want to be able to turn off dynamic contrast, and be able to set R G B values independantly.

Panasonic VIERA TC-32LZ800 ( which I thing has IPS Panel)
Samsung LN32A550 (A650 in theory is 120hz worth it ? ) Panel is S-PVA

I left out cause of it's well known issues
- Sharp Aquos GP1U and GP3U
 

See-Fu

Limp Gawd
Joined
Sep 3, 2008
Messages
230
the a650 only has 120hz if u get 40" and bigger (according to best buy rep).

i just purcahsed the samsung ln32a550 and i will be returning it. as a tv it works fine, but i can't get the dvi->hdmi cable to display text clearly when hooked up to my computer.
 

Nuker

Limp Gawd
Joined
Jun 10, 2008
Messages
240
this thread is out of date it doesnt even mention h-ips

There are also other IPS technologies that aren't mentioned in this thread,like AS-IPS and tw-ips (or what it was called). I think IPS is suited for gaming because it does not have the input lag of TN-monitors thus making them better.
 

smphoto

n00b
Joined
May 15, 2008
Messages
51
I am upgrading from a really old 15" Sony SDM-M51 analog flat panel. Is there any way I can find out the screen technology. It is too old to be listed on the tftcentral site.

That thars a TN panel. Time for an uppie(at least to a newer TN- they can be nice)!
 

Zellio2009

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Nov 22, 2008
Messages
1,057
the a650 only has 120hz if u get 40" and bigger (according to best buy rep).

i just purcahsed the samsung ln32a550 and i will be returning it. as a tv it works fine, but i can't get the dvi->hdmi cable to display text clearly when hooked up to my computer.

That's odd. My 40" displays text perfectly via hdmi-dvi.

Let us know how your next model does.
 

Eppidemic

Weaksauce
Joined
Jan 7, 2009
Messages
73
In many threads, some people have claimed that because of new technology. their are non TN panels that have 5ms res. times. is this true? What would be a good example. I would assume they are more expensive. but if you had the money. would anybody not get one? is $500 enough to pick one up?
 

Eppidemic

Weaksauce
Joined
Jan 7, 2009
Messages
73
In many threads, some people have claimed that because of new technology. their are non TN panels that have 5ms res. times. is this true? What would be a good example. I would assume they are more expensive. but if you had the money. would anybody not get one? is $500 enough to pick one up?

just to add to that. check this Newegg link.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&N=2010190020 1309823867&name=26"

pick any model for under $500. which would it be? link another model if you would prefer it.

thinking of going 26".....

thanks
 
Joined
Nov 25, 2008
Messages
9
Had a pro view LCD monitor.
Well, now I know it was not the best choice.
Died on me 2 months after warranty expired.
Never buy a proview product.

So I hooked up my trusty crt.
Wow, 10 years old, no warranty and it works.
Shes big, bulky.
But, when I press the power button she works.
Cant say that for lcd yet.

:)
 

Technikal

Gawd
Joined
Feb 22, 2009
Messages
590
Would this list be kind of obsolete now? Things have changed alot in the last 3+ years.
 

PGHammer

2[H]4U
Joined
Oct 8, 2002
Messages
3,315
Had a pro view LCD monitor.
Well, now I know it was not the best choice.
Died on me 2 months after warranty expired.
Never buy a proview product.

So I hooked up my trusty crt.
Wow, 10 years old, no warranty and it works.
Shes big, bulky.
But, when I press the power button she works.
Cant say that for lcd yet.

:)

Usually, whenever someone trumpets the merits of CRTs over any non-CRT display technology, it's because they spend a large amount of time in an application/game that looks best full-screen at a resolution OTHER than the desktop default (games are the biggest culprits, because they still by and large have poor support for widescreen resolutions); forcing a 16:9-by-design display to a non-standard 4:3 resolution is naturally not going to show that display in its best light.

As far as ProView goes, Mom has one of their CRTs (17" OEM Panasonic); in fact, she's had it for eleven years.

The biggest issue (other than longevity) for non-CRT display technologies (all of them) remains non-native resolution falloff; by and large, that will remain that way until everything can be driven at the same resolution and refresh rates as the desktop (for the simple reason that CRTs have less falloff from native to non-native resolutions than other display technologies).
 
Joined
Dec 13, 2002
Messages
1,003
The biggest issue (other than longevity) for non-CRT display technologies (all of them) remains non-native resolution falloff; by and large, that will remain that way until everything can be driven at the same resolution and refresh rates as the desktop (for the simple reason that CRTs have less falloff from native to non-native resolutions than other display technologies).

That's not exactly accurate

CRT's do not have a native resultion!

That is one of their majore benefits, they multiscan.

I have one of the FW900's 24" widescreen CRT, it's just as sharp at 1280x800, 1680x1050 and 1920x1200 because in each of the those scenarios's it's actuall scanning out pixels 1:1 800 scan lines, 1050 scan lines and 1200 scan lines respectively. So every resolution a CRT can display IS functionaly native.
 

PGHammer

2[H]4U
Joined
Oct 8, 2002
Messages
3,315
That's not exactly accurate

CRT's do not have a native resultion!

That is one of their majore benefits, they multiscan.

I have one of the FW900's 24" widescreen CRT, it's just as sharp at 1280x800, 1680x1050 and 1920x1200 because in each of the those scenarios's it's actuall scanning out pixels 1:1 800 scan lines, 1050 scan lines and 1200 scan lines respectively. So every resolution a CRT can display IS functionaly native.

All CRTs (even AG) do have a *best* resolution (the equivalent to a native resolution for non-CRT displays). This is the resolution where the best picture can be found (all details taken into consideration).

For non-AG CRTs under 21", this is usually at 1600x1200 or less.

In CRT documentation/advertising, it's not called a *native resolution*, but a *maximum resolution* (even though the CRT may, in fact, be capable of an even higher resolution and/or refresh rate). I have a Micron Electronics (pre-MPC) 19" non-AG CRT (sourced from Panasonic; the OEM version of the PanaSync Pro P70) with a listed (according to documentation from MPC) maximum resolution of 1600x1200 @ 60 Hz (non-interlaced); however, the PanaSync Pro P70 lists that as the *preferred resolution*, but lists the maximum resolution as the same at 75 Hz (still non-interlaced).

So, CRTs have a *native resolkution*; however, it's simply not called that.

However, displaying OUTSIDE that *native/best resolution* is less of a disadvantage for CRTs than for non-CRTs primarily due to the fact that CRTs (and our eyes) are (actually) analog in nature. Basically, the technology of CRTs matches the human eyeball better.

In no case does it deter from the point I have been trying to make - all digital displays (regardless of display type) will continue to have issues as long as we are unable to do *everything* at a single resolution and refresh rate (that is, in fact, a major driver for GPUs today - to enable gaming a the same resolution and refresh rate we run our desktops).
 

SonicTron

Snopes is My Fact Checker
Joined
Mar 9, 2000
Messages
5,894
Would an IPS panel be good for watching movies on?

I'm looking for an LCD 22-24" size with great viewing angles. I play games, but I'm not so hardcore I would demand perfect non-ghosting images. I'm using a Dell E193FP right now and its pretty much the crappiest 19" LCD they had 5 years ago, and I don't notice any major problems except the viewing angles are garbage.

IPS looks like the best for color and viewing angles, but I'm unsure of how happy I would be with this for games and movies as well.
 

drtc

Limp Gawd
Joined
May 19, 2008
Messages
239
All CRTs (even AG) do have a *best* resolution (the equivalent to a native resolution for non-CRT displays). This is the resolution where the best picture can be found (all details taken into consideration).

For non-AG CRTs under 21", this is usually at 1600x1200 or less.

In CRT documentation/advertising, it's not called a *native resolution*, but a *maximum resolution* (even though the CRT may, in fact, be capable of an even higher resolution and/or refresh rate).
So, CRTs have a *native resolkution*; however, it's simply not called that.
With the difference that viewing at a lower than the recommended resolution on a CRT, not only does not degrade the image as with LCD's, but in fact it even provides higher refresh rates.
A 21' CRT with recommended resolution of 1600x1200 @85Hz, will display 1280x1024 @ 100Hz and 1024 x768 @ 120Hz.
The same display can go up to 1920 x1440 @ 60Hz and thats the only part where it does not perform as well, due to low refresh rate an high pixel density.

In LCD's it ONLY Native resolution that is acceptable. Anything less and there is interpolation artifacts. As for higherthat the Native resolutions, it is just not possible...
 

PGHammer

2[H]4U
Joined
Oct 8, 2002
Messages
3,315
With the difference that viewing at a lower than the recommended resolution on a CRT, not only does not degrade the image as with LCD's, but in fact it even provides higher refresh rates.
A 21' CRT with recommended resolution of 1600x1200 @85Hz, will display 1280x1024 @ 100Hz and 1024 x768 @ 120Hz.
The same display can go up to 1920 x1440 @ 60Hz and thats the only part where it does not perform as well, due to low refresh rate an high pixel density.

In LCD's it ONLY Native resolution that is acceptable. Anything less and there is interpolation artifacts. As for higherthat the Native resolutions, it is just not possible...

Tell my Acer H233H (and Mom's H243H) that the only acceptable resolution is native/best resolution.

Interpolation is not an issue at 1280x720 (not the native/best resolution for either LCD display, as both have a native/best resolution for their respective TN panels of 1920x1080 NI); however, that is because both resolution options are of the same aspect ratio, which *is* an issue for non-CRT displays (and is something I don't dispute). CRTs are indeed better at displaying different aspect ratios; however, this is becoming less common, even for gamers (especially with increasing support for the widescreen ARs of 16:9 and 16:10). The need/desire for multiple aspect ratios is, like the need for different resolutions, fast going away. If I need a lower resolution *and* a different aspect ratio, that is what displaying in a window is for, after all. (And if I buy a game that requires a different aspect ratio, and didn't buy enough computer to display it at the best match to my monitor, and it will not display in a window, that is my fault, not that of the developer, because it means I didn't do my homework.)
 

Mr. T

n00b
Joined
Aug 24, 2007
Messages
6
LCD panels can only display resolutions within their boundaries without artifacts. Unless you're talking about displaying at full screen.

Basically, an LCD panel rated for 1280x1024px can display 1024x768 just fine without any artifacts, as long as it's not at full screen. [/obvious]

However, because the signal would have to be spread out over more than one pixel, but less than two (meaning that a fraction of the image will attempt to be displayed on a neighboring pixel), you cannot run at a resolution of 1024x768 if it's in full screen mode. Even though it's the same aspect ratio.

CRTs do not have this problem, because they do not have a fixed number of pixels.


Anyway, I have a Samsung 943BWX. Does anyone know what kind of panel it is?
 

PGHammer

2[H]4U
Joined
Oct 8, 2002
Messages
3,315
LCD panels can only display resolutions within their boundaries without artifacts. Unless you're talking about displaying at full screen.

Basically, an LCD panel rated for 1280x1024px can display 1024x768 just fine without any artifacts, as long as it's not at full screen. [/obvious]

However, because the signal would have to be spread out over more than one pixel, but less than two (meaning that a fraction of the image will attempt to be displayed on a neighboring pixel), you cannot run at a resolution of 1024x768 if it's in full screen mode. Even though it's the same aspect ratio.

CRTs do not have this problem, because they do not have a fixed number of pixels.


Anyway, I have a Samsung 943BWX. Does anyone know what kind of panel it is?

That is also a point in favor of CRTs.

Further, 1280x1024 (while not strictly 4:3) is close enough where 4:3 CRTs can approximate it. 16:9 and 16:10 FP displays (regardless of construction) will have issues with such an utterly alien aspect ratio.

1280x720, 1680x1050, and 1920x1080 are all either 16:9 or 16:10: problematical for 4:3 displays, but not for 16:9/16:10 displays (again, regardless of construciton type).

Windows itself (same applies to all other graphical desktops) generally has little to no issue with 16:9 or 16:10 AR; the same is true with most applications (including most games; by most applications, I am also including Web browsers and the information they display, as it is a rare public Web site that is still set up for a 4:3 AR). Multiplatform games are even more (not less) likely to support 16:9/16:10 AR, as this is a common resolutions for TVs. For older games without 16:9 support, in most cases, they *can* be run in a window (C&C Generals is the last C&C without support for 16:9/16:10; fortunately, even low-end PCIe graphics cards can drive 1280x1024 in a window with this game); however, the game must explicitly suport running in a window. (Bioshock is another game without 16:9 support, which is surprising as it is also multiplatform; fortunately, like C&C Generals/Zero Hour, it has a windowed 1280x1024 option. Amusingly, it actually runs better in a window, on my hardware, than Zero Hour.)

That, however, does not detract from the point of my reply to the OP - the usefulness (or lack thereof) of a particular display is still based on the source material (what you feed the display). The source material often determines the aspect ratio (especially when the source is not a computer), so it is more relevant for non-computer displays OTHER than TVs.
 
Joined
Feb 3, 2010
Messages
660
damn i wish i would've seen this thread before buying my monitor. what kind of response times do VA monitors have?
 

vibe

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Oct 27, 2005
Messages
1,488
Does anyone know the website that allows you to enter two monitor dimensions for comparison with DPI etc.

There are a couple of them but I can't find them in my bookmarks, argh
 

vibe

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Oct 27, 2005
Messages
1,488
Thanks hardBBQ, just what I wanted.
Could have sworn there was another on a co.uk domain but I can live with those.
 

DaRuSsIaMaN

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Apr 22, 2007
Messages
1,216
I also thank wonkman for posting this sticky. But it has now been 4 years, so maybe we need some updates?

What do you guys think or know about the latest backlighting technologies? I know LED backlighting is now being adopted by most manufacturers. Is there any other that should be mentioned? All I know about LED backlighting is that it's much more power efficient, and these new LED-based lcd's will consume a lot less power. So that's awesome. Are there any effects, positive or negative, from LEDs on the display quality itself?

Also, I'm seeing very few IPS panels with LED so far. Is there some particular reason why it seems that almost all of the LED-based models are TN?
 

JamesDude

Weaksauce
Joined
Nov 3, 2010
Messages
65
I have read that there are some LCD monitors made with CHEAP (blueish color) LED backlighting. Because of that, the color gamut was not as good as some of the CCFL ones.

And the better ones are the RGB LED backlight, where the backlight sources are a combination of Red, Green, & Blue color LED lights. This is supposed to be the best ones.

The question that I have is, how can I tell if a monitor is powered by a Cheapish LED or a RGB LED?

Thanks in advance.
 
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