ssd partitions and longevity?

Kdawg

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Aug 12, 2017
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in default Windows install, you make a good size partition for system and apps and documents.

I dunno how ssds technically work. But if this partition gets heavily used, is the nand gonna get worn out faster in just this partition?

I thought ssds spread out all the data writing over all the nand.
Do partitions restrict where data gets written?

I ask/worry about this because on my old 750gb laptop hdd clunker with bad sectors, the write performance was totally jacked in the first 75gb, and the last 150gb, dipping all the way down to <2MB/s
and there were bad sectors during read at the 52gb area.
These were probably the more heavily written areas.

08-January-2021_17-05.png
 

daglesj

Supreme [H]ardness
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May 7, 2005
Messages
5,335
Dont worry about 2010 thinking. Just get the SSD and use it. Wear and tear isn't really an issue unless you are a data centre. Just get a decent quality MLC/TLC flash SSD and enjoy. Samsung Evo or a Crucial MX500 will do you just fine if you go SATA type.

Do it NOW!;)
 

drescherjm

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Nov 19, 2008
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But if this partition gets heavily used, is the nand gonna get worn out faster in just this partition?

Avoid getting the smallest and cheapest SSD and the wear out problem is not a concern unless you have a very unusual usage pattern or you are writing to the drive 24/7/365
 
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Dan_D

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Avoid getting the smallest and cheapest SSD and the wear out problem is not a concern unless you have a very unusual usage pattern or you are writing to the drive 24/7/365

I've killed many SATA and PCIe/NVMe SSD's. The reason for this is using them for benchmarking in reviews. As a result of doing that, these things seem to die pretty fast. Drives I use normally in my personal machines rarely fail in contrast to what happens on the test bench.
 

daglesj

Supreme [H]ardness
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Actually looking at that HDTune...it's a Toshiba...surprised that drive has lasted that long.
 

edo101

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Jul 16, 2018
Messages
306
in default Windows install, you make a good size partition for system and apps and documents.

I dunno how ssds technically work. But if this partition gets heavily used, is the nand gonna get worn out faster in just this partition?

I thought ssds spread out all the data writing over all the nand.
Do partitions restrict where data gets written?

I ask/worry about this because on my old 750gb laptop hdd clunker with bad sectors, the write performance was totally jacked in the first 75gb, and the last 150gb, dipping all the way down to <2MB/s
and there were bad sectors during read at the 52gb area.
These were probably the more heavily written areas.

View attachment 317290
I'm very new to this storage stuff. How do you check for bad sectors/know when your HDD will die? I have a Samsung Spinoint from 2008 that's still kicking. Have no idea what type of health it has daglesj
 

drescherjm

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14,886
How do you check for bad sectors/know when your HDD will die?

A simple and quick way is to see what CrystalDiskInfo says. If it says Caution the drive probably is not good.

A more complex and thorough way is what I do for every hard drive (just spinners not SSDs) being an IT admin.
At home and at work where I have tested 100s of drives I use a more extensive test that involves a linux utility called badblocks which in data destructive mode (overwrites your disk so use with caution) it writes 4 times writes a pattern to the disk then reads every single sector to verify that the pattern is read back on every single sector. Using this method long ago I detected a firmware bug in the Samsung F4 2TB drive model (that was eventually fixed by the manufacturer). I have a thread about that here:

https://hardforum.com/threads/new-drive-badblocks.1551753

Here is one I posted on a different forum:
https://forums.gentoo.org/viewtopic-t-847350.html

BTW, the firmware bug ended up being if you asked the drive for its SMART status during a write of data the drive sometimes randomly skipped actually writing a chunk of the sectors (previous sector contents remained) but returned to the OS that the write succeeded leaving no error code or any other indication of a problem. If you read the data back you had no error but you had the previous contents of the data trashing whatever file or folder you had updated ..
 
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