Socket 1156 roadmap high end?

Majeztik12

Limp Gawd
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Jun 8, 2004
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I currently own a i5-750. Overclocked it screams in a lot of games. However where is 1156 going, seeing as there will be no 6 core solution. Will Intel release higher clocked variants of their current i7 solution? Possible on a die shrink? ...just wondering!
 

E4g1e

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May 21, 2002
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I currently own a i5-750. Overclocked it screams in a lot of games. However where is 1156 going, seeing as there will be no 6 core solution. Will Intel release higher clocked variants of their current i7 solution? Possible on a die shrink? ...just wondering!

The P55 chipset and its non-integrated-graphics-supported equivalents will have a short life. (So will the lifespan of the quad-core i5, which is an i7 with Hyper-Threading disabled internally.) Reading the current Intel roadmap, it appears that all future LGA1156 processors will be only dual- or triple-core with integrated graphics controller. Eventually, all future i7 processors will be LGA1366 only while all future LGA1156 (soon to be changed to a partially incompatible Socket 1155 with the forthcoming Sandy Bridge) platforms will have integrated graphics/video enabled (this means the i5-6xx series processors, as well as the i3 which is basically an i5-6xx CPU with the Turbo feature disabled) - and some of the LGA1156 (LGA1155) systems will not support PCI-e graphics cards at all (the integrated graphics in such systems will be permanently enabled, and cannot be turned off whatsoever). The existing quad-core LGA1156 processors will remain on the 45nm process until their discontinuation. The Sandy Bridge processors cannot be used at all on existing LGA1156 platforms; however, current LGA1156 processors might be able to be used on newer LGA1155 motherboards. (This is opposite to what AMD currently uses for Socket AM3 - that socket has 938 pins, two fewer pins than Socket AM2; however, the pins are underneath the actual CPU package on AMD platforms as opposed to the on-motherboard placement on Intel platforms.)
 
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QuadMe

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Mar 14, 2010
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The P55 chipset and its non-integrated-graphics-supported equivalents will have a short life. (So will the lifespan of the quad-core i5, which is an i7 with Hyper-Threading disabled internally.) Reading the current Intel roadmap, it appears that all future LGA1156 processors will be only dual- or triple-core with integrated graphics controller. Eventually, all future i7 processors will be LGA1366 only while all future LGA1156 (soon to be changed to a partially incompatible Socket 1155 with the forthcoming Sandy Bridge) platforms will have integrated graphics/video enabled (this means the i5-6xx series processors, as well as the i3 which is basically an i5-6xx CPU with the Turbo feature disabled) - and some of the LGA1156 (LGA1155) systems will not support PCI-e graphics cards at all (the integrated graphics in such systems will be permanently enabled, and cannot be turned off whatsoever). The existing quad-core LGA1156 processors will remain on the 45nm process until their discontinuation. The Sandy Bridge processors cannot be used at all on existing LGA1156 platforms; however, current LGA1156 processors might be able to be used on newer LGA1155 motherboards. (This is opposite to what AMD currently uses for Socket AM3 - that socket has 938 pins, two fewer pins than Socket AM2; however, the pins are underneath the actual CPU package on AMD platforms as opposed to the on-motherboard placement on Intel platforms.)

Do you have a source on this? Interesting that Sandy bridge will have permanent intergrated graphics that can't be disabled.
 

E4g1e

Supreme [H]ardness
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Do you have a source on this? Interesting that Sandy bridge will have permanent intergrated graphics that can't be disabled.

No, I did not mean that. But some motherboards which support Sandy Bridge will not have a PCI-e x16 slot at all. Hence, on those particular motherboards there will be no way at all whatsoever to disable the integrated graphics. (And this depends on the chipset implementation, which is unknown at present.)
 

QuadMe

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86 5.0L

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Nov 13, 2006
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nice to know x58 wont be an obsolete platform anytime soon
 
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