Slow network transfer on Windows 7

Discussion in 'Networking & Security' started by Dutt1113, Apr 6, 2010.

  1. Dutt1113

    Dutt1113 [H]ard|Gawd

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    I was wondering if anyone has solved the very slow network file transfer issue on windows 7? I get like 1.0mbps on a wireless-G laptop to wireless-N desktop using a netgear wndr3700 router. I have tried disabling remote differential compression on both computers. The laptop is Vista and the desktop is Windows 7. This slow network transfering speed is driving me nuts.
     
  2. awesomo

    awesomo Gawd

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    Now did you mean Megabits or megabytes?

    If it's Megabytes/sec, that's about what you're gonna get if they are both on 2.4ghz due to the nature of how wireless works. If the N desktop is on 5ghz only then you should see around 2.5 megabytes/sec max transferring from the G laptop. I haven't used this router, so I don't even know if it supports 5ghz and 2.4ghz at the same time, probably does.

    If it's mbits, than that is a piss poor number. Are you running Vista SP2? Do you know if the channel you are running on is clean? If using 2.4ghz mode for N access, is 40mhz wide-band mode enabled?

    On a wire, I have no file transfer slowdowns between vista and 7.
     
  3. Dutt1113

    Dutt1113 [H]ard|Gawd

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    its 1.0 megabytes per sec. Wireless G is 54 megabits per second which should be around 6.75 megabytes per sec max. I know the G is the bottleneck, but I am nowhere near upwards of 6 megabytes per second considering you will probably never get max. The N desktop is dual band and so is the router. I'm getting more like wireless B speed, what gives
     
  4. keenan

    keenan 2[H]4U

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    You won't ever get anywhere near 54mbps out of an 802.11g network, even in ideal conditions. About half that is the maximum you can realistically expect. Don't forget to add TCP overhead on top of this 27mbps too. Maybe 24mbps real world throughput in TCP.

    Further, wireless is a shared medium, and in an infrastructure network (one with an AP you associate with), stations can't talk directly to each other. All traffic must be relayed through the AP, and because it is a shared medium, that uses double the available capacity. Now you're down to about 12mbps best-case. That's not much more than you're seeing, so your result is not unexpected.

    If you're actually using 5GHz for the 802.11n machine (if possible set the AP such that the 2.4GHz radio is 802.11g only and the 5GHz radio is 802.11n only), you can expect a maximum of maybe double that performance, but wireless is highly variable and 1MB/s is not unreasonable at all in any case. Use wires if you care about performance.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2010