Skylake-X Direct Die Frame Cooling Frame

FrgMstr

Just Plain Mean
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This device certainly harkens back to the days of using frames on our fragile AMD Thunderbird CPUs, before Integrated Heat Spreaders IHS) were a thing. As you might know, overclocking and cooling even the "lesser" Skylake-X CPUs is not a walk in the park. So this Direct Die Frame would likely be a great thing when it comes to cooling one of these extremely hot CPUs.


The der8auer Skylake-X Direct Die Frame at a Glance: Allows the CPU to be operated and cooled without a heatspreader - Secure mounting for maximum cooling performance - Compatible with current Socket 2066 motherboards - Manufactured in high-grade black anodized aluminium
 
My current motherboard came with something nearly identical, MSI calls it the "Delid Die Guard"

I dunno if I'd be ballsy enough to run a CPU that pricy delidded with or without a guard heh
 
I remember the pads that used to come on some of those early socketed AMD chips. This is a nice improvement over that for sure.

I perused the photo gallery on the product page and it looks like quite a nicely finished product. They include a backplate and everything.
 
I remember burning up a 1.33 ghz Thunderbird CPU back in the day.....the die was so small and i don't think i had enough thermal paste on it because it was toast in 2 seconds....
I lived in fear after that......even fear of chipping the die due to over tightening the heat-sink.
 
Anyone else remember that crunching sound? The one that told you that you were finished with this CPU?

Or that one processor we all had where the edges on the die looked like we'd taken a chainsaw to them but the thing would still run just fine?
 
Anyone else remember that crunching sound? The one that told you that you were finished with this CPU?

Or that one processor we all had where the edges on the die looked like we'd taken a chainsaw to them but the thing would still run just fine?
Sickening. Broke the first 1GHz CPU I ever had possession of.
 
Anyone else remember that crunching sound? The one that told you that you were finished with this CPU?

Or that one processor we all had where the edges on the die looked like we'd taken a chainsaw to them but the thing would still run just fine?

Had a high overlcocking Duron that was like that, edges are all cracked. lol
 
I wonder if this still works...

Why I have it right next to my desk is beyond me...

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direct to the die hasn't gotten great results since 3770k came out. Danger den has a kit for direct die for 5 years now on there evo supremacy cpu blocks. Could it be different for skylake-x
 
He has a video out on his channel.

He was able to have his 18 core x299 chip clock to 4.5ghz at 1.27vcore while keeping the max temperatures under 90 degrees C on Prime95(non avx)

He compares results to LM delided chips and it is around a 5-10 degree difference on peak and average temperatures.
 
Anyone else remember that crunching sound? The one that told you that you were finished with this CPU?

Or that one processor we all had where the edges on the die looked like we'd taken a chainsaw to them but the thing would still run just fine?

Yep.. but that sound is nothing compared to over tightening a water block and hearing a cracking sound. Took the water block off and discovered I had broken the CPU into 3 pieces.

The copper shims were great for protecting the die compared to just the lame foam pads that came on them. I still have a couple of the copper shims for socket-A processors. Have one in use in my KT7A Barton 2.4Ghz build. :D

The only real question I have about this direct-die plate is:
What about insulating the capacitors? If you don't seal those suckers up, you are going to end up with corrosion and a dead CPU. How do I know this? It happened to me way back in the day with a de-lidded K6-2 that I was direct-die liquid cooling.
 
I ran my Opteron 165 naked with a Big Typhoon and some tiny dampening pads I cut from those foam that comes on top of the CD-R/DVD-R piles (that I don't think did a whole lot as it probably compressed very quickly). The setup is collecting dust in a drawer (DFI Lanparty NF4 + OCZ Gold VX ram days when even RAM required fans too to operate normally haha). Back then overclocking required more work for sure, even had to swap the northbridge cooler to some other one because it got a bit too hot for my liking despite using some extra fans directed to only cool down mobo.

I'm suprised this product hasn't appeared sooner TBH, it's a simple but effective solution IMO and saves some hazzle as putting the heatspreader back is more tricky than removing it using available tools so this makes de-lidding easier sort of.
 
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Ah, good old days of using a shim to protect your Thoroughbred/Barton, as you attempted to attach or detach those finicky and poorly designed claws to go onto them stupid socket tabs that broke off with the slightest provocation.

Thank god we have moved on to bolt through using metal brackets.

BTW, Thermalright SLK-900 was a beast for its time. U model being the better of the two.
 
I remember burning up a 1.33 ghz Thunderbird CPU back in the day.....the die was so small and i don't think i had enough thermal paste on it because it was toast in 2 seconds....
I lived in fear after that......even fear of chipping the die due to over tightening the heat-sink.
Oh you wont crack Si without some really high torque... Si makes glass look like playdoh
 
Oh you wont crack Si without some really high torque... Si makes glass look like playdoh

The problem with those little targets for cooling was that it wasn't easy to seat the heat-sync evenly. Silicon is hard as a coffin nail and also very brittle when forced to flex.

I could also go on about the teeny-tiny lugs on those Athlon ZIF sockets that always snapped off. Those things were the beginning of heat-syncs that fastened to the motherboard becoming mainstream. I'd bet some people here broke a motherboard or two with that kind as well.

Or by freezing them so cold the frost crept in around your Foam-it on the back on the MB.
 
I loved the little metal pocket for the flat head screw driver so that you could apply enough force to break steel directly at your motherboard. I honestly thought the turn to lock mount was a huge improvement.
 
Will be nice, if it ever becomes available to buy. My ordered & prepaid Delid-Diemate-2 is on backorder since mid Dec. 2017, delivery date as of now from Caseking is 12th Feb. 2018. Nice gadgets, both, if you get one.
 
Now that's a throwback! I remember using a pencil on my Thunderbird to jump connections on top; worked like a charm. Then I jostled the cooler and chipped the die. Goddammit.
 
I remember the joys of skipping a screwdriver across my brand new board putting those fuckers on.... never fried a board (thanks be to God).
oh god, the heartbeat skip when that happened and they joy when he computer still started.
 
I still remember the satisfying sound of my previous employer chipping off the corner of a T-Bird die because he refused to let me help him install a Golden Orb.
 
I remember the days when all my friends were too gun shy to install heatsinks. They would get the entire rig together, then have me come over to do the final snap. Hell i still get calls today...

Ah the days of the 4 rubber feet, and the 4 rubber feet on the heat sink in the same spot, at the same time...
 
I remember the joys of skipping a screwdriver across my brand new board putting those fuckers on.... never fried a board (thanks be to God).

I never cracked or chipped a die, but man was I nervous whenever I had to attach those bloody clips.

Even worse was if you had a super tight case, and you had to use an extra long screwdriver. At some point I'd just mount them onto the mobo first before screwing it in, rather than risk literally punching a hole through the board.

I'm also glad that 80mm and 92mm fans are no longer the most commonly used size.
 
The good old Thunderbirds..... I broke one of those before I learned the trick to putting on the HSF. I was trying to teach the bosses son how to put them on he didn't listen and broke 3 CPU's in a row. I'm pretty sure I could still do it if I had to.
 
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