One PC, two networks

Joined
Mar 4, 2019
Messages
44
Is it possible in a PC with multiple network adapters to have them run on separate networks? Meaning, one wold have one subnet and IP setup, and the other NIC being on a different subnet and IP setup. The thinking would be then that internet traffic and regular network traffic wouldn't get on the same network, and one slow down the other. Or, am I overthinking this, and it doesn't matter.

Also, I have link aggregation setup and operational via LACP in WinServer2008R2. While my server shows a 4Gb connection, and my workstation a 3Gb, max data transfer is still around 120MB/sec. Shouldn't this be a bit closer to 300MB/sec?

Thanks, y'all.
 

Cmustang87

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Oct 4, 2007
Messages
4,482
1.) Yes you can have two NICs on a PC and connect them to two different networks.

2.) Data transfers are still limited by disk read/writes on both sides of the transaction. But, that’s not what’s going on here. LACP uses a hashing algorithm to determine which interface to use for a particular stream. For this reason, bandwidth isn’t aggregated and LACP is used for redundancy, not throughput.
 

IdiotInCharge

NVIDIA SHILL
Joined
Jun 13, 2003
Messages
14,712
I would Love to...cant afford to.
You don't need a switch- you can get 10Gbit Intel-based NICs on Ebay from datacenter pulls for pennies, and then grab the appropriate connecting equipment to put two machines together, assuming that they both have available slots.
 

toast0

Gawd
Joined
Jan 26, 2010
Messages
990
Thanks. How would I combine for better bandwidth?
LACP is never going to get you more than a single link's bandwidth for a given TCP/UDP connection; so your best bet is to use multiple connections, if that can be made to work with your use case.
 

Eickst

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Aug 24, 2005
Messages
1,873
For just PC to server, i second/third the suggestion to just get 10gb nics. They are super cheap used, get some 10baseT ones and you can probably get 10gb with the cat5e you're already using if the runs are short enough.
 
Joined
Mar 4, 2019
Messages
44
So, instead of having three or four ports "bundled" together in one IP address, are you saying to leave the ports individual with their own respective IPs?
 

Cmustang87

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Oct 4, 2007
Messages
4,482
What's suggested is to install 10Gb NICs in each machine. Then connect these two devices directly so that when the 2 devices communicate it will go over the 10G connection.
 

/dev/null

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Mar 31, 2001
Messages
14,858
10Gbit nics are $15-$20 on ebay.
You should be able to pick up MMFS transceivers (sfp+ -- if not included with the nic) for $5 each and a piece of mmf fiber 3m for $15 or so.

Another option might be nics + DAC, but I think compatibility is better with fiber + transceivers personally.

Also: If you want more than 2 pcs hooked together a mikrotik 4 port 10G switch with 1 G port to connect to the rest of your network is like $150 + transceiver cost.
 
Joined
Mar 4, 2019
Messages
44
So, in reading how others have done this, i may have overlooked something. One guy set up a VLAN and gets 176MB/sec over a 2Gb connection. I would readily settle for 350MB/sec over a 4Gb connection. Is the VLAN necessary?

Next, regarding 10Gb parts, I have been looking at RJ45 solutions for this, as I have CAT6 cabling throughout the house. This option isn't off the table, but would require a new switch. That's just not in the budget at the moment. I sincerely appreciate all y'all's input here.

One last question...if I do decide to go with 10Gb hardware, is a PCI-E 2.0 x4 connection enough? Most places are saying 2GB/sec on that, but seeing some with a 2Gb/sec data rate. Thanks.
 

IdiotInCharge

NVIDIA SHILL
Joined
Jun 13, 2003
Messages
14,712
Most places are saying 2GB/sec on that
This is correct for PCIe 2.0 x4

but seeing some with a 2Gb/sec data rate
This is one of those wonderful misstypes with tech.

Next, regarding 10Gb parts, I have been looking at RJ45 solutions for this
If you just need it between a few points, there's very little reason to dedicate a switch. If one is needed, Mikrotik makes smaller SFP+ switches that are inexpensive. These can also take a 10Gbase-T RJ-45 transceiver down the line.

We're still a few years off from 10Gbase-T RJ-45 switches becoming common at consumer pricepoints.
 

IdiotInCharge

NVIDIA SHILL
Joined
Jun 13, 2003
Messages
14,712
OK, now that I am home and can look at this stuff, it's starting to make sense. You're the second one to mention the Mikrotik units. Looking at them now, one thing I'm a little unclear on...I need to purchase the switch AND the transceivers that are mentioned above, right? This is the unit you're referring to, also, correct? https://www.amazon.com/MikroTik-CRS...hvlocphy=&hvtargid=pla-4583589104872239&psc=1
That's the most accessible one, yes. The transceivers as mentioned above are pretty cheap, as is the fiber. I do recommend getting a parts list together and having the members above check it to ensure you've got what you need switch or no, but getting 10Gbit between two or three nodes isn't really a challenge or significant expense with some planning and dedication.
 
Joined
Mar 4, 2019
Messages
44
Got it. I'm plenty new to this type of thing. I won't have a long run...longest will be 35'. Looking through things now...not finding the ultra cheap stuff, even on eBay, and part of my issue is needing a PCI-e 2.0 x4 adapter, I think. The x8 units seem easier to come by, but that's not an option. Your help is greatly appreciated.
 
Top