New oc'er looking for advice

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Cooling' started by patnmel97, May 14, 2018.

  1. patnmel97

    patnmel97 Limp Gawd

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    As the title says I'm new and don't know where to start, there's a lot of tutorials online was looking for some direction from the H family on a good starting point

    Msix470 gaming pro
    Ryzen5 2600x
    Ripkaw 3000 cl15

    Went with msi board because I'm a budget guy who builds every few years but would like to get more involved and there bios looked more user/noob friendly. Thanks for looking
     
  2. ReaperX22

    ReaperX22 Limp Gawd

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    IMHO... Let it OC itself.. The new XFR/Precision Boost kinda outdoes manual overclocking in a lot of applications because the boost on a few cores exceeds what you can manually attain by overclocking. Most people average an all-core OC of 4.1-4.2ghz. But the stock turbo already goes higher than this (on a few cores only)

    As a result in gaming, you get a better result often just leaving it stock and providing it with ample cooling.

    For multi-threaded workloads the benefit is there, but even then it's somewhat marginal.

    The 2600X is borderline already at its 'limit' when you receive it. I planned to upgrade to one actually and let it do its own thing myself.. Eventually lol.
     
  3. patnmel97

    patnmel97 Limp Gawd

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    Thanks for the reply I've been reading the same, building a new rig leaves me with my old rig to scratch the OC itch, what are some good resources, tutorials.

    I5-3570k
    Biostar tz77b
    Corsair vengeance
    2x8 ddr3 1600
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2018
  4. HiryuuX

    HiryuuX Limp Gawd

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    I'd actually agree to let XFR2 do its thing for your Ryzen 5 2600X- chances are if you're a gamer, you are better off letting the processor automatically boost itself during intensive applications. If anything, you might install a better cooler :)

    As for the 3570k setup, there's a lot of Z77/3570k or 3770k overclocking guides on the web if you just do a quick search. Here's an example, albeit for Asrock motherboards but the concept is the same. Bump multiplier up, adjust voltage as necessary, and perform stress testing. I'd do it slowly though 200-300MHz should be fair. Just keep in mind you definitely want an aftermarket cooler if overclocking the 3570k.

    http://www.overclock.net/forum/5-in...e-sandy-bridge-ivy-bridge-asrock-edition.html
     
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