Most threads in a desktop cpu?

choppedliver

Limp Gawd
Joined
Jan 3, 2005
Messages
479
I don't keep up with this stuff nearly as much as I used to... I am wanting to build a rig soon though with at least 4cores/8threads... was wondering what the most number of cores/threads in a DESKTOP cpu is right now and within say the next 6 months? I can't afford a server cpu/mobo. I like to run virtual machines and I like to encode x264 mainly. I don't do a lot of gaming.
 

rastaban

Gawd
Joined
Jul 30, 2011
Messages
818
6c/12t but they cost as much as lower to mid-range server parts. Look up Intel Sandy Bridge-E socket LGA2011 for X79 chipset. The i7-3930K and 3960X are the current top of the line. They came out a little under a year ago and a refresh, Ivy Bridge-E on 22nm, is rumored to release in the next few months (but there are also rumors of it being cancelled).

If the $500 to $1000 price range is too high, you can drop down to the previous consumer enthusiast line with 6c/12t. For those, look up Gulftown socket LGA1366 for X58 chipset. The i7-970,980,980X, 990X should be available in the $400-$900 range.

If you want affordable, the new AMD Vishera CPU's that just launched have great value for highly multi-threaded applications. There is a pretty good review on the front page of Anandtech about them. Power consumption is relatively high though, especially when overclocked.
 

choppedliver

Limp Gawd
Joined
Jan 3, 2005
Messages
479
Awesome info, Thanks. I hadn't even thought about AMD since bulldozer ( I think ) was such a disappointment. I figured at some point lower performance per thread would diminish the importance of having numerous threads.

My current cpu is a 4 core 4 thread q6600 "core 2" so Im not even in the "iFamily". Wondering how much jump I would get out of going to a 4/8 in perhaps the i5 family to save money, or would should I just go ahead and hold out for something in the current/soon to be released i7n family
 

ND40oz

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Jul 31, 2005
Messages
12,584
6c/12t but they cost as much as lower to mid-range server parts. Look up Intel Sandy Bridge-E socket LGA2011 for X79 chipset. The i7-3930K and 3960X are the current top of the line. They came out a little under a year ago and a refresh, Ivy Bridge-E on 22nm, is rumored to release in the next few months (but there are also rumors of it being cancelled).

IB-E isn't scheduled for release until Q3 2013.

My current cpu is a 4 core 4 thread q6600 "core 2" so Im not even in the "iFamily". Wondering how much jump I would get out of going to a 4/8 in perhaps the i5 family to save money, or would should I just go ahead and hold out for something in the current/soon to be released i7n family

No i5's are 4c/8t, you have to go i7 for that.
 

choppedliver

Limp Gawd
Joined
Jan 3, 2005
Messages
479
ahh.. well there goes that idea... I guess if were talking a year down the road I better be looking in the current i7 catalog
 

rastaban

Gawd
Joined
Jul 30, 2011
Messages
818
IB-E isn't scheduled for release until Q3 2013.
Interesting, I didn't see the news on that (just looked it up). Looks like Intel is finally going 8 (maybe 10?) core in the desktop lineup.

ahh.. well there goes that idea... I guess if were talking a year down the road I better be looking in the current i7 catalog

That gives you the mainstream Ivy Bridge and Sandy Bridge i7's as viable 4c/8t options (socket LGA1155, you can look up the chipset configurations on Wiki). The hyperthreading does come in handy for parallel workloads like transcoding.

Ivy choices: i7-3770K (overclockable), 3770, 3770S (low TDP, may throttle)
Sandy choices: i7-2700K (overclockable), 2600K (overclockable), 2600, 2600S (low TDP, may throttle)

Expect to pay a maximum of $330 for the 3770K
 
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