Mid Range DSLR Purchase Help!

Fire488

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Hello [H]!
I am in the matket for a new camera. Over the years I have purchased many point and shoot digital cameras and have been extremely unsatisfied and downright dissapointed with the results. These were NOT cheap cameras either. I do not know the first thing about cameras or how to operate them, but I will learn. I just don't ever do entry level anything and do not want to start now. I am looking for the best I can get going mid range.
I have been looking at and may already be set on the Canon EOS 70D. I really like what it offers, but I just want to make sure I am not overlooking anything. The other option is the Nikon D7100. I know they are both apparently very good, but as i said I just want to make sure.
What do you guys think?

Thanks for the help.
 

teh_chem

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Micro 4/3 mirrorless if you don't want a huge bulky body. But then you'll be more limited on lenses, plus the auto focus on most are pretty poor.

You could even look at the smaller, more entry level options like the Canon t3i/SL1. We have the sl1 and really like it's compact design yet high quality results.

But..photography is far more about the practice and learning than it is about the camera body price. Just something to keep in mind when folks start to recommend expensive bodies, they may not have any impact on the quality of photos you end up taking.
 

Fire488

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Micro 4/3 mirrorless if you don't want a huge bulky body. But then you'll be more limited on lenses, plus the auto focus on most are pretty poor.

You could even look at the smaller, more entry level options like the Canon t3i/SL1. We have the sl1 and really like it's compact design yet high quality results.

But..photography is far more about the practice and learning than it is about the camera body price. Just something to keep in mind when folks start to recommend expensive bodies, they may not have any impact on the quality of photos you end up taking.

Thanks for the reply and I understand that, but I just want to grow into a better camara rather than outgrow a cheaper one. Plus I have the money for it. Thanks again.
 

silk186

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first step is to go into the store and try them. at a given price range sony, canon and nikon are all similar in performance. Find the one you feel most comfortable using as after you invest in lenses it will be expensive to change.
 

Fire488

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first step is to go into the store and try them. at a given price range sony, canon and nikon are all similar in performance. Find the one you feel most comfortable using as after you invest in lenses it will be expensive to change.

Good points. I have held them and used them in the store evironment which is not a very good way to test I know. Also as I said I am very new to this and in the process of learning now.
 

silk186

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canon 70d or 7d mark ii would be my preference. Your budget would help
 

northrop

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In a grand scheme of things, it really doesn't matter much. Both, 70D and D7100 are more than capable of producing stunning images, and there aren't that many differences between the two, until you get deep into technicalities (fps, mp, iso performance, viewfinder coverage, dynamic range, etc.) Comes down to preference, and what's more important to you, as well as the type of photography you are aiming to do primarily.

If you feel more at home with the 70D, than by all means, get it. You won't regret it. Also, do you have any close friends with similar cameras (as in, DSLR's?) if so, what do they have? If they're all shooting with a Canon gear, this will put you in a position where you might be able to get help and/or be able to borrow glass from them.

Personally, I'd go with Nikon, but I'm already heavily invested in this system, and my opinion is heavily biased ;)
 

Anh N.

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Canon 6D is also a viable option, fairly small, light weigh full frame DSLR wise. It has exceptional IQ, GPS, wifi remote control via phone (ios/android), very good ISO range. Altho not as good focus system as some others, the center focus is very good. The refurb or used version can be had for around $1300 also. The extra money can be invested in a good lense.

Another option is the Nikon D610, also top notch for a decent price.
 
Last edited:

Ron024

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Also take a look at the lenses that you want. Bodies change every year, lenses have a much longer lifetime. But I would definitely go into a shop and handle them. Nothing worse than regretting the way it feels.
 

dvsman

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Glass, glass and more glass. From my own adventures (& misadventures) in photography, I've learned that the body is important but only just so. The quality of your lenses is much much more important. As a Canon guy - I've seen the difference between HQ lenses and the average lens that often come with the camera.

The big question is what types of pictures do you want to take?
 

Parja

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Also consider how "manual" you want to get with taking pictures. Do you have any experience with a DSLR? If you're not ready to give up some of the automatic features, upper-mid models like the 6D, 7D, 70D, D7100 might not be the best choice. Taking a step back to the T4i/D5300 still give you a lot of the more powerful features but still give you more automatic options for when you just don't really feel like futzing with the camera to get a decent shot.
 

Choopyplz

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You could look at the Canon 60D too. IMO the 70D doesn't offer anything over the 60D for most people. The biggest feature it has over the 60D is the ability to take advantage of the STM lenses by canon for better autofocus while shooting video. IMO either are a good compromise between features and price though. They are just above the rebel line and offer better (and easier) manual control over your shots, but aren't as pricey as the 7D which you may not fully utilize anyway.
 

Megalith

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The lens line-up is the last thing I look at when it comes to buying a camera. I mean, come on. Any decent brand out there (Nikon, Canon, Fuji) has good lenses for most of the common/essential focal lengths. I buy based on ISO performance, ergonomics, and the look of the camera.

That said, Canon's stuff is just hideous.
 

cyclone3d

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Pentax

I have the K-30 right now. Really nice camera, especially for the price.

Pentax also has a lot of very nice lenses, and what they don't have you can get 3rd party.

Pentax also does in-body shake reduction so you can have shake reduction even with 40+ year old lenses.

If you want to go all out with Pentax, you can get a K-3.
 

Daggah

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Micro 4/3 mirrorless if you don't want a huge bulky body. But then you'll be more limited on lenses, plus the auto focus on most are pretty poor.

If by "poor" for m4/3 autofocus, you mean pretty damn quick and extremely accurate, with fully functional face-detect AF, then I'll agree, m4/3 AF is "poor."
 

Daggah

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The lens line-up is the last thing I look at when it comes to buying a camera. I mean, come on. Any decent brand out there (Nikon, Canon, Fuji) has good lenses for most of the common/essential focal lengths. I buy based on ISO performance, ergonomics, and the look of the camera.

That said, Canon's stuff is just hideous.

I'm not sure I agree with this. Nikon and Canon's APS-C sensor lens lineups are both very lacking. You pretty much have to buy FF lenses or third-party to get decent options, especially when it comes to prime lenses or fast zooms.
 

Fire488

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Sorry for the late reply as i have not been well lately, but i did go with the Canon 70D through Costco because it came as a bundle with multiple lenses, a case, and Sd cards, etc. I have much to learn and plan on some college courses to help me understand this thing. I know I need better lenses and ion time will get them. if anyone would like to help out with lens choices I'm all ears...

Thanks again!
 

northrop

grumman
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Get this book, read the manual, learn all there is to know about the gear you currently have, and only then start looking into getting more glass. Not only will you have a better understanding of what you actually need, but you will also be more familiar with your shooting style, which will then help you narrow down what other glass (if any) will be needed to expand your hobby. In the mean time, have fun shooting, and congrats on the purchase!
 

Fire488

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Get this book, read the manual, learn all there is to know about the gear you currently have, and only then start looking into getting more glass. Not only will you have a better understanding of what you actually need, but you will also be more familiar with your shooting style, which will then help you narrow down what other glass (if any) will be needed to expand your hobby. In the mean time, have fun shooting, and congrats on the purchase!

I really appreciate that man. I love this camera and have been using it. I do dabble and experiment with it, but the auto feature, although taboo among many pros is just so darn good on this camera. Thanks again.
 

stinger608

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There is also a boat load of great tutorials online that one can look at.

Here is just a small few that I have started checking out..........LOL as I need a ton of knowledge as well. :p

http://designinstruct.com/photography/digital-photography-beginners-tutorials/

http://photography.tutsplus.com/art...s-for-beginners-and-professionals--photo-3673

http://digital-photography-school.com/digital-photography-tips-for-beginners/

As I said, that is just tipping the ice berg of what is out there. I don't see a reason in the world to pay for college classes. Unless you really need the "hands on" type of class.
 

jamsomito

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That said, Canon's stuff is just hideous.

I lol'd. I think Nikon stuff looks like cheap toys. But to each their own! Both take great pics which is most important.

OP, I just got a 70D as well and I've been really happy with it. Tons of room to keep learning and grow your hobby. Wish i could have gone full frame but it was too rich for my blood. This crop sensor camera is miles ahead of my last crop body though (20D). The sensors have come a long way since then.

I'll second what everyone else is saying - read the manual, some books, or heck even YouTube has some great tutorials, and a lot of good ones specifically for the 70D as well. I was amazed by the features when I started digging through the menus, and then digging further through the custom menus. Lots of options.

What lenses did you get with your camera? Also, are you planning on doing any video?
 

Fire488

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There is also a boat load of great tutorials online that one can look at.

Here is just a small few that I have started checking out..........LOL as I need a ton of knowledge as well. :p

http://designinstruct.com/photography/digital-photography-beginners-tutorials/

http://photography.tutsplus.com/art...s-for-beginners-and-professionals--photo-3673

http://digital-photography-school.com/digital-photography-tips-for-beginners/

As I said, that is just tipping the ice berg of what is out there. I don't see a reason in the world to pay for college classes. Unless you really need the "hands on" type of class.

I am definitely a hands on type person, but I will view what you have linked...Thank you.
 

Fire488

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I lol'd. I think Nikon stuff looks like cheap toys. But to each their own! Both take great pics which is most important.

OP, I just got a 70D as well and I've been really happy with it. Tons of room to keep learning and grow your hobby. Wish i could have gone full frame but it was too rich for my blood. This crop sensor camera is miles ahead of my last crop body though (20D). The sensors have come a long way since then.

I'll second what everyone else is saying - read the manual, some books, or heck even YouTube has some great tutorials, and a lot of good ones specifically for the 70D as well. I was amazed by the features when I started digging through the menus, and then digging further through the custom menus. Lots of options.

What lenses did you get with your camera? Also, are you planning on doing any video?

Congrats on your new toy as well! Here is what i purchased (hope this is allowed):
http://www.costco.com/Canon-EOS-70D-DSLR-Camera-2-Lens-Bundle.product.100129567.html

I purchased a manual specifically about this camera too, but I have to admit that I have very little understanding of the terms regarding light, speeds, etc are talking about.
David Busch's Canon EOS 70D
 

jamsomito

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Sweet. That 55-250 is a stellar lens, especially with what you paid for it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5wZAvUmPUA

There is a bit of a learning curve with the lingo. The first one to master is the exposure triangle that consists of aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. Speed can mean shutter speed (or how long the sensor is exposed to light), or it is also used loosely with lenses: a "fast" lens is one that has a large possible aperture, which means it can let in more light allowing faster shutter speeds.

Also helpful is a "stop" is something that lets in 2x or 1/2x as much light. For example, an aperture of 4 to 5.6, or a shutter speed of 1/150 to 1/300, or an ISO of 800 to 400 are all "stopping down" one stop, thus letting in half as much light.

Have fun!
 

bman212121

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I lol'd. I think Nikon stuff looks like cheap toys. But to each their own! Both take great pics which is most important.

OP, I just got a 70D as well and I've been really happy with it. Tons of room to keep learning and grow your hobby. Wish i could have gone full frame but it was too rich for my blood. This crop sensor camera is miles ahead of my last crop body though (20D). The sensors have come a long way since then.

I'll second what everyone else is saying - read the manual, some books, or heck even YouTube has some great tutorials, and a lot of good ones specifically for the 70D as well. I was amazed by the features when I started digging through the menus, and then digging further through the custom menus. Lots of options.

What lenses did you get with your camera? Also, are you planning on doing any video?

So you already played with your Christmas present? Tsk tsk.

Was going to ask you to give an update to see how it went. :)
 

jamsomito

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It was only partially a christmas present :) But sure, I'll update my thread so the OP can keep this one for his questions and feedback.
 

Fire488

Limp Gawd
Joined
Sep 14, 2007
Messages
438
Sweet. That 55-250 is a stellar lens, especially with what you paid for it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5wZAvUmPUA

There is a bit of a learning curve with the lingo. The first one to master is the exposure triangle that consists of aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. Speed can mean shutter speed (or how long the sensor is exposed to light), or it is also used loosely with lenses: a "fast" lens is one that has a large possible aperture, which means it can let in more light allowing faster shutter speeds.

Also helpful is a "stop" is something that lets in 2x or 1/2x as much light. For example, an aperture of 4 to 5.6, or a shutter speed of 1/150 to 1/300, or an ISO of 800 to 400 are all "stopping down" one stop, thus letting in half as much light.

Have fun!

Will do thanks you.
 

bman212121

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Congrats on your new toy as well! Here is what i purchased (hope this is allowed):
http://www.costco.com/Canon-EOS-70D-DSLR-Camera-2-Lens-Bundle.product.100129567.html

I purchased a manual specifically about this camera too, but I have to admit that I have very little understanding of the terms regarding light, speeds, etc are talking about.
David Busch's Canon EOS 70D

Plenty of kit there to get started. The camera will not disappoint but if it does, it's the user! :p

You definitely need to read and experiment. Just pull the camera out and use it. Get used to the layout and some of the features it has. If the pictures are not as desired it's probably down to a couple of very simple issues. The first is "fill the frame". If your desired subject does not use up all of the viewfinder then you need to step closer. The 18 - 55mm is going to require that you stand closer to the subject than what you probably realize. Setup the shot, then step forward, and look at it again. You probably were too far away the first time. :p The difference between the two shots is more information from the sensor. More information = better photos. Secondly is exposure. Getting enough light to the sensor is critical for a good shot. The camera has multiple ways to try to adjust so you can get enough. If not then you can use power external flashes which will assist in low light situations. Those two things alone can make the difference between poor and decent picture.
 

Fire488

Limp Gawd
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Messages
438
Plenty of kit there to get started. The camera will not disappoint but if it does, it's the user! :p

You definitely need to read and experiment. Just pull the camera out and use it. Get used to the layout and some of the features it has. If the pictures are not as desired it's probably down to a couple of very simple issues. The first is "fill the frame". If your desired subject does not use up all of the viewfinder then you need to step closer. The 18 - 55mm is going to require that you stand closer to the subject than what you probably realize. Setup the shot, then step forward, and look at it again. You probably were too far away the first time. :p The difference between the two shots is more information from the sensor. More information = better photos. Secondly is exposure. Getting enough light to the sensor is critical for a good shot. The camera has multiple ways to try to adjust so you can get enough. If not then you can use power external flashes which will assist in low light situations. Those two things alone can make the difference between poor and decent picture.

Thank you I will take that into consideration.
 
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