Microchipping humans

What is your stance on subdermal implant chips?

  • I have one and I like it!!

    Votes: 3 2.2%
  • I don't have one, but want one!

    Votes: 11 8.1%
  • What choice do we have..I will take it if I have to

    Votes: 3 2.2%
  • YOU'LL NEVER TAKE ME ALIVE!! I will not be chipped!!

    Votes: 119 87.5%

  • Total voters
    136

UltraTaco

Gawd
Joined
Feb 21, 2020
Messages
983

States are cracking down on companies microchipping their employees — how common is it?


ndiana is a step closer to forbidding companies from forcing workers to implant microchips in their bodies, following the state House of Representatives’ unanimous passage of a bill last week that could make it the 12th state with such a law.

Is this just a bill to protect against the stuff of science fiction?

Not at all, say experts on workplace law and technology, who worry the rice-sized microchips can open up massive questions about worker privacy and company surveillance.
“I would definitely not call it far-fetched,” said Ifeoma Ajunwa, a Cornell University labor and employment law professor focused on the ethical use of workplace technology. It’s been three years since workers at one Wisconsin company voluntarily had microchips inserted in their hands, and it’s likely there are “more companies out there, but they are probably not advertising it,” Ajunwa said.
In the same way certain smartphone users arrange to get work emails on their personal phone, some chipped workers use their chip at the office so they can, for example, open up doors without company badges or key fobs.
In some cases, it’s tech-savvy workers who bring the chips to their bosses’ attention, said Amal Graafstra, CEO of Dangerous Things, a Seattle, Wash.-based implantable chip manufacturer and distributor, and VivoKey Technologies, a chip manufacturer
Those workers — typically on the IT side of a business — get an implant for personal use. The microchip is typically inserted between the thumb and index finger. The chips Graafstra’s company sells start around $50, plus an optional $50 for insertion with an affiliated doctor or piercing expert.
In the same way certain smartphone users arrange to get work emails on their personal phone, Graafstra said some chipped customers use their chip at work so they can, for example, open up doors without company badges or key fobs. In Sweden, people have been using microchips to store their emergency contact information, and pay for train rides and gym memberships.
Graafstra thinks the implanted chips could potentially eliminate all sorts of lost productivity from lost key badges, but he says many of the current orders could be motivated by something else.
“I would say it’s probably out of the cool factor,” he said. A handful of businesses told Graafstra they were implanting the chips for media attention, he added. “There’s definitely a marketing angle for some.”
The use of microchips on employees doesn’t appear to be spreading fast in corporate America, as far as he can tell. His companies received approximately 100 orders for various amounts of chips from American businesses between 2015 and 2018. For context, his chip manufacturing company Dangerous Things has sold between 150,000 and 200,000 chips domestically and abroad, mostly to individuals, since it launched in 2013.

“I wouldn’t say there are businesses going hog wild with chip implants,” he said.

Seven states have banned mandatory microchipping of humans​

Nonetheless, lawmakers in Indiana and other states stand ready to legislate on the issue.
‘Employers cannot go to employees and say ‘We’re doing away with name badges and microchipping you all.’
— — Indiana state Representative Alan Morrison
“What we’re trying to say is employers cannot go to employees and say, ‘We’re doing away with name badges and microchipping you all,’” the Indiana bill’s author, Rep. Alan Morrison, a Republican, told MarketWatch a week after the 96-0 vote.
Employers cannot condition a job offer on chip insertion and if workers lose their job for allegedly refusing to implant one, the bill lets them sue for damages.
Morrison said he was not aware of any companies in Indiana that have attempted to microchip employees. The only instance he knew of was the Wisconsin-based tech company Three Square Market, where approximately 50 workers voluntarily had chips inserted in 2017. (The company did not respond to a request for comment, but has previously said it has “zero interest in tracking anyone.”)
If the bill passes, Indiana would join four other states that outlaw mandatory microchipping for employees, said Pam Greenberg, a researcher on privacy and technology policy issues at the National Conference of State Legislatures, a resource organization for state governments.
Seven other states ban mandatory microchipping for any human, Greenberg said. Pending bills in Iowa and New Jersey would ban the forced microchipping of workers and another in Tennessee would ban mandatory microchipping for anyone.
Wisconsin started the trend, enacting its law against forced microchiping in 2006. That’s two years after the FDA approved implantable chips for humans, and long since veterinarians started using them on animals to help lost pets find their way home.
Yet even as more lawmakers worry about implantable devices, people keep getting more enmeshed in technology — and possibly Big Tech surveillance — without any sort of surgically inserted chip. Smartphones now unlock with a face scan or a thumbprint, and consumers can carry out financial transactions with biometric mobile wallets. Workers are also more accepting, or at least more aware, of the possibility their company is monitoring their moves.
Morrison acknowledges companies already have ways to track workers and there are no state laws laying ground rules on the issue. But there’s a difference with microchips, he said. “You can’t ever walk away from that. The company knows where you are 24/7.”
Graafstra, the owner of the chip companies, says it’s not that cut and dry. If a chip opens a simple device — like a door lock — there’s no data created or stored, he said. But if a person uses it with devices that create and store data, like a security system backed by cloud computing, they are giving up more information about themselves.
“It really depends exactly on how you are using it and what you are using it for,” he said. There’s a parallel with the trade-off between the anonymity of cash and the ease of a credit card, Graafstra added. “If you choose a credit card over cash, you’re telling lot of people, a lot of companies, where you were and what you were spending on one day.”

Nevada wanted to ban voluntary microchipping at one point​

Ajunwa, the Cornell professor, says laws banning workers’ forced microchipping are necessary, but there’s a weak spot.
The overwhelming majority of American workers are hired presumably “at will,” which means they can be fired any reason — except for factors including pregnancy, race and gender.
What if subtle hints about job security influence someone into having a microchip? ‘Then consent is not really meaningful in that case.’
— — Ifeoma Ajunwa, a Cornell University labor and employment law professor
Suppose a worker gets subtle hints they’re not a part of the team and perhaps putting their job on the line if they don’t have a microchip, Ajunwa said. “Then consent is not really meaningful in that case.”
Graafstra said workers would get the protections they needed under the various microchipping laws.
In fact, he thinks state legislators can sometimes go too far. A Nevada bill at one point would have banned voluntary microchipping, but it was amended and passed last year to only apply for involuntary implants.
Graafstra — a man with four chips implanted in his left hand and two in his right hand — understands when people take a dim view of microchipping. “I’d say you’re acting like regular human who’s skeptical of something they are unaware of. … With any technological change, there’s always a ‘this is crazy’ crowd.”
Morrison, the Indiana lawmaker, wants to draw a boundary now regardless of what happens with microchipping in the future.
“Sometimes it’s a slow drip into the marketplace,” Morrison said. “I think it’s good to be out in front on this thing.” State senators could vote on the bill by February, he said

Taco didn't even know this is so widespread!
Mates, the end is cming!! Are you chipped? Do you plan to be chipped?

Votes are hidden.

Nd9GcTOYQ2oBPJiPj7umRaKftDlzwvioDhiQRt2Yw&usqp=CAU.jpgMICROCHIP-1-1580766345.jpg
 

/dev/null

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Mar 31, 2001
Messages
15,090
I don't even want a work "id badge" that is an app on my phone. I'll stick with my RFID card which doesn't require a bettery & cellphone signal, thanks.

The wrong question is being asked....if youre employer insists on chipping you, will you overclock it????
 

GoodBoy

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Nov 29, 2004
Messages
1,886
No company can force you to do that.

If it's not a full-on borg implant, pass. Don't need that wanna-be junk implant.
 

Darunion

2[H]4U
Joined
Oct 6, 2010
Messages
4,050
Not heard of this happening to anyone I know of. I would take implants if they improve functions like eyesight or reflexes, maybe self regeneration etc, but not just some dumb rfid crap.
 

UltraTaco

Gawd
Joined
Feb 21, 2020
Messages
983
Just to clarify something, we are talking about microchipping, so in order to have ATIvisiontek or Nvidia's iRayVisionPro, you'll need capable hardware. In other words, you'll need to have your biological eye removed, nd have this installed:
retinalprosthesis.png

Are you ready for this step?
 

ThreeDee

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Sep 5, 2001
Messages
10,987
Bible stuff yo:
15And it was allowed to give breath to the image of the beast, so that the image of the beast might even speak and might cause those who would not worship the image of the beast to be slain.16Also it causes all, both small and great, both rich and poor, both free and slave, to be marked on the right hand or the forehead,17so that no one can buy or sell unless he has the mark, that is, the name of the beast or the number of its name.18This calls for wisdom: let the one who has understanding calculate the number of the beast, for it is the number of a man, and his number is 666.
Revelation 13:15–18
 
Joined
Jun 10, 2004
Messages
3,817
Revelation 13 is coming FAST.

I wont take it,or the coming 'mandatory' mRNA vaccines from Project 'WarpSpeed'.... General Perna is a demon,imho,a very evil man. Not taking anything in my body over an over hyped season flu, like cough, that has a 99.6% recovery rate.
 

Nafensoriel

Limp Gawd
Joined
Nov 23, 2015
Messages
280

States are cracking down on companies microchipping their employees — how common is it?

/snip
Forced Chipping? Yeah how much do you like having that hand attached to your arm? :D
Chipping in general though? Has some significant advantages in certain things. Security is one. Health is another.
I don't like how companies are defining use and not governments and public opinion. The holder of the implant really needs to have absolute and unadulterated control over their own implant at any time. Otherwise I cant think of a single way it passes the privacy "smell test".
The technology needs a few decades to really become valuable though.
 

THRESHIN

2[H]4U
Joined
Sep 29, 2002
Messages
3,197
Just to clarify something, we are talking about microchipping, so in order to have ATIvisiontek or Nvidia's iRayVisionPro, you'll need capable hardware. In other words, you'll need to have your biological eye removed, nd have this installed:
View attachment 298122

Are you ready for this step?

If I was near blind, I'd be all for it. To be clear, I'm very nearsighted and I think I'd keep my own eyes and glasses for now thanks. I just don't see why I'd bother if I can still get by just fine. Maybe others with perfectly good eyes would do this for whatever potential benefits there might be. I work in a nuclear plant and I have to say it would be very cool to be able to see gamma radiation. I'm not prepared to have my biological eyes cut out for it though.

I'm perfectly fine with someone doing what they want with their own body. It could even be argued that implants such as an electronic eye is the next step in human evolution. Forced evolution that is. I see no reason to restrict such research. So long as we all have the choice, I say great.

Getting back on topic, microships in humans....ok let's stop being around the bush here. The fear is that if you were microchipped the powers that be would be able to track you. Sure valid fear. It's not like there's a device out there that already has this ability that you could just put in your pocket.... something that people would accept willingly and even pay a lot of money to own....oh wait.

My point is forget forcing people to take implants to track them. It's already been done and just about all of us use that device every day and carry it around with us almost all the time.
 

kju1

2[H]4U
Joined
Mar 27, 2002
Messages
3,293
My point is forget forcing people to take implants to track them. It's already been done and just about all of us use that device every day and carry it around with us almost all the time.

There is a big difference between your phone, which I believe you are alluding to, and something thats implanted into your body. Your phone you can easily get rid of or set aside temporarily. Not so much with an implant.

Also with a phone it generally requires warrants, or breaking the law, to track. An implant could conceivably be read by anyone with the appropriate equipment. I dont see anyone talking about securing these things...
 

1_rick

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Feb 7, 2017
Messages
1,463
If I was near blind, I'd be all for it. To be clear, I'm very nearsighted and I think I'd keep my own eyes and glasses for now thanks. I just don't see why I'd bother if I can still get by just fine. Maybe others with perfectly good eyes would do this for whatever potential benefits there might be. I work in a nuclear plant and I have to say it would be very cool to be able to see gamma radiation. I'm not prepared to have my biological eyes cut out for it though.

I'm perfectly fine with someone doing what they want with their own body. It could even be argued that implants such as an electronic eye is the next step in human evolution. Forced evolution that is. I see no reason to restrict such research. So long as we all have the choice, I say great.

Getting back on topic, microships in humans....ok let's stop being around the bush here. The fear is that if you were microchipped the powers that be would be able to track you. Sure valid fear. It's not like there's a device out there that already has this ability that you could just put in your pocket.... something that people would accept willingly and even pay a lot of money to own....oh wait.

My point is forget forcing people to take implants to track them. It's already been done and just about all of us use that device every day and carry it around with us almost all the time.

You can turn off your phone. You can't disable an rfid tag in your arm nearly as readily.
 

UltraTaco

Gawd
Joined
Feb 21, 2020
Messages
983
What's frightening taco is how easy it cn be implemented in such times. With this virus season, you can easily be frowned upon by media and public for refusing "smart-vaccine", which helps cure the virus nd helps track you nd notify you of 'possible virus contact'.

You will quickly become the public enemy #1 for fighting what's 'good for society'. Think of the children!!!😭😭😭

They will forbid you access to food purchases and essential services because you don't carry 'proper id'.
 

kju1

2[H]4U
Joined
Mar 27, 2002
Messages
3,293
What's frightening taco is how easy it cn be implemented in such times. With this virus season, you can easily be frowned upon by media and public for refusing "smart-vaccine", which helps cure the virus nd helps track you nd notify you of 'possible virus contact'.

You will quickly become the public enemy #1 for fighting what's 'good for society'. Think of the children!!!😭😭😭

They will forbid you access to food purchases and essential services because you don't carry 'proper id'.

People are sheep. Or maybe lemmings would be a more appropriate analogy. Ive seen a lot of talk of requiring vaccines to go out in public or back to work. Anyway implants are probably the way of the future but NOT until we have some pretty damn strong security built in. Way better than what we have today on our phones even.
 

Soulstorm brew

Weaksauce
Joined
Mar 29, 2019
Messages
95
Revelation 13 is coming FAST.

I wont take it,or the coming 'mandatory' mRNA vaccines from Project 'WarpSpeed'.... General Perna is a demon,imho,a very evil man. Not taking anything in my body over an over hyped season flu, like cough, that has a 99.6% recovery rate.
And so it begins
https://www.rt.com/uk/506443-boris-gates-pharma-vaccines-military/

UK PM Boris Johnson has met with billionaire vaccine evangelist Bill Gates and 10 Big Pharma CEOs to discuss rolling out the Covid-19 jab and unveil the country’s new Gates-funded plan to “prevent future pandemics.”
 
Joined
Oct 12, 2020
Messages
48

States are cracking down on companies microchipping their employees — how common is it?




Taco didn't even know this is so widespread!
Mates, the end is cming!! Are you chipped? Do you plan to be chipped?

Votes are hidden.

View attachment 297783View attachment 297784
I had no idea that was widespread.

Absolutely not. Just sounds like a recipe for security issues galore and my tin foil hat is tingling with regard to the government.
 

Aix.

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Sep 30, 2010
Messages
1,898
Outside of more convenient access control ("convenient" in that you'll never worry about losing the $10 access card you use to access your workplace) I can't think of a reason why your average joe blow employee would want to do this, and that convenience would be a stupid ass reason to get something implanted in your body. When it comes to your privacy you should be treating your employer like the police: they need to know some things because you have relationship as employer/employee, and they want to know other things because it can help them control you (with no benefit to you). Don't volunteer information to your employer.
 

tangoseal

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Dec 18, 2010
Messages
9,089
If I was near blind, I'd be all for it. To be clear, I'm very nearsighted and I think I'd keep my own eyes and glasses for now thanks. I just don't see why I'd bother if I can still get by just fine. Maybe others with perfectly good eyes would do this for whatever potential benefits there might be. I work in a nuclear plant and I have to say it would be very cool to be able to see gamma radiation. I'm not prepared to have my biological eyes cut out for it though.

I'm perfectly fine with someone doing what they want with their own body. It could even be argued that implants such as an electronic eye is the next step in human evolution. Forced evolution that is. I see no reason to restrict such research. So long as we all have the choice, I say great.

Getting back on topic, microships in humans....ok let's stop being around the bush here. The fear is that if you were microchipped the powers that be would be able to track you. Sure valid fear. It's not like there's a device out there that already has this ability that you could just put in your pocket.... something that people would accept willingly and even pay a lot of money to own....oh wait.

My point is forget forcing people to take implants to track them. It's already been done and just about all of us use that device every day and carry it around with us almost all the time.
Well all decay radiation is light so youd need an implant eye that can see light with a gamma frequency around 1x10^-12 hz which is freakishly high frequency. I dont see why we cant make a devixe that is hand held that could superimpose what a detector is seeing on top of the visible light range of electromagnetic radiation.
 

TheSlySyl

Gawd
Joined
May 30, 2018
Messages
754
Who lotta people in this thread apparently don't have enough cyberpunk becoming cyborg dreams.
 

THRESHIN

2[H]4U
Joined
Sep 29, 2002
Messages
3,197
Well all decay radiation is light so youd need an implant eye that can see light with a gamma frequency around 1x10^-12 hz which is freakishly high frequency. I dont see why we cant make a devixe that is hand held that could superimpose what a detector is seeing on top of the visible light range of electromagnetic radiation.

It sort of exists in the form of a camera. It's also still quite expensive and not small. I am not aware of any hand held models but it wouldn't surprise me to see one.

Mostly just idle daydreaming.
 

vegeta535

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Jul 19, 2013
Messages
5,056
Outside of more convenient access control ("convenient" in that you'll never worry about losing the $10 access card you use to access your workplace) I can't think of a reason why your average joe blow employee would want to do this, and that convenience would be a stupid ass reason to get something implanted in your body. When it comes to your privacy you should be treating your employer like the police: they need to know some things because you have relationship as employer/employee, and they want to know other things because it can help them control you (with no benefit to you). Don't volunteer information to your employer.
You be surprised how easily privacy gets thrown out for convince. I mean we all have one in our pockets and people freely pay to put devices onto their homes.
 

Hakaba

Gawd
Joined
Jul 22, 2013
Messages
846
I figure credit cards, banks, or other monetary institutions offering 0% financing/free money or rewards... Will lead the chipping revolution.

Or PornHub, get chipped for a free month...
 
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