Looking for a solid ethernet network card

Discussion in 'Networking & Security' started by lDreaml, Jul 23, 2019.

  1. lDreaml

    lDreaml n00b

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    Ended up getting their modem. Maxing out at 300Mbps DL and 150Mbps UP on fast.com. Utterly disgusted with bell right now. I only have one desktop connected to the modem. Using a cat6 cable and have a 1Gbit ethernet card. Set it to 1gb full duplex in device manager. Tried every port, still the same abysmal results. Their tech support attempted to help over the phone for 2+ hours each time only to come up clueless. Even got a replacement modem 3 hours after initial instillation. This one is running even slower. Tech support said they'd look over my ticket over the weekend and will give me a call. I think bell is stalling to get me to be locked into paying them for this joke of a connection. And this all comes without even mentioning how the guy who drilled a hole in the side of my house to get the fiber cable in literally drilled an inch away from the outlet lifting the outlet face-plate off... Day 2 and I'm about to call them to cancel their service. What a huge mistake. All that came out of this was structural damage to my house.
     
  2. purple_monster

    purple_monster Limp Gawd

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    some more tests i use that seem to max out my speed and affect everyone else in the household-
    1) a steam game, valve really pushes it to you as fast as your connection can handle
    2) a linux distro via torrent, again so many sources the bottleneck is always you
    3) do this while plugged into one of the hard ports on your wifi device(but not actually using wifi), there is usually some switchports on the back, then you can rule wifi issues out

    with these i usually get a speed that is similar and can confirm what i am actually getting... good luck seems like a nightmare.
     
  3. lDreaml

    lDreaml n00b

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    purple_monster Launched steam and was instantly bombarded with updates. One game had a 10gb update and the peak speed I was downloading at was 41MB/s with the average being 32-40MB/s. 41MB/s is essentially 320Mbps. This is all through the use of one wired connection with all wifi devices disabled. Funny thing is tech support went from being shocked at my speeds to suddenly saying that's normal or high end speed for a single user. Not to mention the fact that every tech support agent doesn't speak English.

    Edit: Second game to update is averaging 20-24MB/s.. This is almost the same I was getting on my last ISP with a 120Mbps connection.
     
  4. purple_monster

    purple_monster Limp Gawd

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    i wish i was at home to show you a screenshot but that is the same speeds i get when downloading a game, so maybe that test isnt that great since i pay for 50meg internet, so maybe steam actually flattens out at that speed when i thought it was going as fast as my connections. sorry i cant be more help.
     
  5. lDreaml

    lDreaml n00b

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    purple_monster No worries, bud. At least you speak English and offer real-world tests to help determine things rather than fake numbers that mean absolutely nothing to the end-user (like their tech support hangs onto).
     
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  6. HammerSandwich

    HammerSandwich [H]ard|Gawd

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    On Fios Gb, I've found Steam to vary a bit. It's always over 300Mbps, but good days give 700+. The WAN is big & has a lot of variables...
     
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  7. Nicklebon

    Nicklebon Gawd

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    I know ISP bashing is all the rage and whatnot but given the age of your rig are you sure that's not the problem? Have you done testing that leads you believe something on your end is not the problem. For example I've got a laptop here that can hit 800-900Mbps on a good day provided I disable the security software. If I don't disable the security sw it tops out at 300-400Mbps. Just because you can link up at 1000Mbps doesn't mean you'll see that kind of throughput.
     
  8. lDreaml

    lDreaml n00b

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    Nicklebon I've tried everything, including trying it on different computers with better specs. It's the isp. Cancelled the service.
     
  9. GotNoRice

    GotNoRice [H]ardForum Junkie

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    Sad to hear that it didn't work out with your ISP, but unless you have other options, 320Mbps should still be plenty fast for 99.999% of internet usage, even heavy downloading. In fact, I'd rather have a 100Mbps connection with no monthly data caps than a "1.5Gbps" service with restrictive monthly data caps, so speed really is not the only critical variable here.

    For speeds faster than 1Gbps, I'm seeing lots of modems come out with 2-4 Gigabit Ethernet ports. I'm not talking about modem+router combo devices, but actual modems. For example, the Arris SB8200 Cable Modem comes with 2 Gigabit ports and advertises max of 2Gbps internet speeds. This is done via link-aggregation (using both 1Gbps ports simultaneously and combining the speed), assuming it's actually enabled by your ISP and supported on your router. Modern versions of Windows are also getting much better when it comes to link aggregation. Like for example I put a cheap quad-port Intel gigabit adapter in my file server, and an Intel dual-port in my main computer (along with the 2 Intel gigabit ports on the motherboard) and with all 8 of those links connected to the same switch, that gives me up to 4Gbps transfers between my main computer and my file server. This is all handled automatically by Windows, with each adapter having it's own internal IP and without setting up conventional NIC teaming or anything like that. It just works. The ISP site the OP linked says "Assuming optimal network conditions. A wired connection and at least one additional wired or wireless connection are required to obtain total speeds of up to 1.5 Gbps with Gigabit Fibe 1.5." at the bottom, which sure seems to imply that link aggregation might be the solution here. That is what I would have tried first if the ISP had actually seemed capable of providing those speeds.
     
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