I'm sitting very close to a 48" 4k tv, is there any point in getting VR?

Nebell

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Excuse the stupid question, but I have never tried VR and probably won't have a chance to try it. So I had to ask this question since I have no experience with VR.
My TV is slighly curved and takes pretty much my whole view. That's why I'm thinking that VR might not impress me that much?
What do you guys think? Worth spending 900 on Vive if I already have a large tv for gaming?
 

limitedaccess

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Accomplishes different things.

Do you have smartphone? What model? Buy one of those cheap phone-> VR kits (such as google cardboard, a few bucks including shipping) so you can get an idea.

Probably will see more retail stores carrying demos going forward.
 

Nebell

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Accomplishes different things.

Do you have smartphone? What model? Buy one of those cheap phone-> VR kits (such as google cardboard, a few bucks including shipping) so you can get an idea.

Probably will see more retail stores carrying demos going forward.
I have S6 Edge+, but I'm afraid that using a cell phone would ruin my VR experience. I got dizzy by holding my cell phone near my eyes. It was hard to focus.
Perhaps I should just wait and see if I can test VR somewhere. I really would like to buy it now though, if it's something cool.
What different things does it accomplish? It's just a screen in front of your eyes, right?
 

The_Oasis

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I have S6 Edge+, but I'm afraid that using a cell phone would ruin my VR experience. I got dizzy by holding my cell phone near my eyes. It was hard to focus.
Perhaps I should just wait and see if I can test VR somewhere. I really would like to buy it now though, if it's something cool.
What different things does it accomplish? It's just a screen in front of your eyes, right?
Hey Nebell! VR is some super cool stuff, but it's so much more than just a screen in front of your eyes. The new consumer versions coming out very soon actually have two displays in them, both with a lens over each to create that stereoscopic view.

The thing about VR is that you shouldn't have to try to focus or anything like that. Even with something as simple as GearVR, it's very natural to use, with the most basic use-guidelines: look around.

If you're in a big city, you're probably pretty close to a VR meetup. I know that the Chicago VR meetup already has at least one Vive at their meetups, and if you find one near you, you can head on in and try VR out for yourself. It's worth it, believe me.
 

waters10

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Excuse the stupid question, but I have never tried VR and probably won't have a chance to try it. So I had to ask this question since I have no experience with VR.
My TV is slighly curved and takes pretty much my whole view. That's why I'm thinking that VR might not impress me that much?
What do you guys think? Worth spending 900 on Vive if I already have a large tv for gaming?
No matter how big your tv, you won't get the FOV of a VR headset. And FOV is only a part of what makes VR. Head tracking with no lag and stereoscopic 3d brings a ton to the table. One of the major benefits is how you perceive scale. Things that are "big" or "far" now becomes instantly recognizable. In traditional games, devs employ some tricks to give you that perception. With VR, you don't need to and it enhances your experience like nothing else. It's one of the first thing people notice when they first try it.

Don't worry about not being able to try. You will be able to try it if you want to. Just hold tight, things are launching within a few months and there will be demos available in stores.
 

EricGRIT

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Feb 14, 2011
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I actually just picked up a Galaxy S7 w/Gear VR and I would recommend NOT getting a cardboard (versus Gear VR or Rift/Vive) style HMD if you don't want to be turned off of VR. Yes, it is cool for a few minutes but the whole system isn't designed to give the best image quality (poor optics), low lag (uses phone sensors only), etc. This is coming from someone who had one of those cheap plastic "cardboard" cases. After trying the Gear VR which has built-in sensors for more accurate and lower-latency tracking, much better optics, comfort, etc., this is actually getting me excited for the Rift and/or Vive. Truly a world of difference, and hopefully a world of difference from this to the Rift/Vive as well. The responsiveness and FOV with a more VR-tailored HMD induces presence, something you aren't going to get with the cardboard models.

If you are worried about getting turned off of VR, or really want to be talked into it, I really believe you need to have a great experience. For me, I knew I was going to get a Rift/Vive from day one, so I grabbed a cheapo cardboard and it was fun but certainly not indicative of what VR is all about.
 

westrock2000

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Excuse the stupid question, but I have never tried VR and probably won't have a chance to try it. So I had to ask this question since I have no experience with VR.
My TV is slighly curved and takes pretty much my whole view. That's why I'm thinking that VR might not impress me that much?
What do you guys think? Worth spending 900 on Vive if I already have a large tv for gaming?
Try turning your head, how's that big computer screen filling your view now?
 

0neTwo

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Imagine looking at a picture of Mount Everest vs actually standing there looking at it. That is the difference from a TV to VR.
 

Youn

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but if you've never actually stood anywhere like that it's really difficult imagining any difference it might make... apart from being far away from creature comforts like a bathroom and mobile internet porn...

It wasn't until I was 30 years old and I drove with someone up toward red rock canyon that I was finally hit with how awesome nature can be... the view was unlike anything I've seen before, and I was not expecting to be impressed by it at all when my friend talked me into going.... but it was pretty eye-opening...

I guess VR will be something like that... difficult to image how you'll react really. You may just be like "ew, those pixels, and where's my beer.. oh no, what did I just step into, was that last week's chinese?"
 

Dr. Righteous

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Excuse the stupid question, but I have never tried VR and probably won't have a chance to try it. So I had to ask this question since I have no experience with VR.
My TV is slighly curved and takes pretty much my whole view. That's why I'm thinking that VR might not impress me that much?
What do you guys think? Worth spending 900 on Vive if I already have a large tv for gaming?
I try to explain it like this to those who really don't know.

I ask "Have you ever been to a 3D movie". Most everyone has. "Did you enjoy the 3D effects?" Most will say yes.
"You could see a real depth in the picture and the near and far of objects really brought the movie to life right?" Most will say, Yes it really did.
Then I ask "Did you feel like you were in the movie yourself?" They will say, well no of course not.
I respond with "VR bridges this gap. the 3D effect surrounds you, and visually your brain is convinced what you are seeing is real because all the queues for how it perceives these things are there."
This is why VR is more than just a effect like 3D on a screen and also why this first generation of products are expensive.
That said you won't get a convincing VR experience from hack VR like Google Cardboard, etc. You get a 3D image, something like looking into a GAF View Master like most kids had in the old days. It is a slightly more advanced 'stereo viewer'

Now, concerning the expense I would suggest to follow my lead and wait on these products to mature more. There are other VR systems in development, there is better software in the pipeline for all this. Give it a year or so and then revisit VR.
The first generation of new tech is never the best example of it.
 

Snowdog

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I ask "Have you ever been to a 3D movie". Most everyone has. "Did you enjoy the 3D effects?" Most will say yes.
I saw Avatar with group of friends, most of us were unimpressed with 3d, thought it a gimmick and never saw another 3D movie. I don't think this is a good example.

We are early in VR. Anyone undecided should wait until the can try it, to form their own opinions.
 

Nebell

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Yeah, I've decided to wait with VR, it just doesn't seem like something that would impress me much. On the contrary, I think I have too high expectations from it and would be disappointed.
I think most people are excited because it's new tech, and I understand that.
When it comes to VR, I think Microsoft HoloLens would be more fun since I don't really expect it to be a game changer.
 

heatshiver

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I would wait to get it, but more for budgetary reasons and lack of games (which are coming); otherwise, go for it!
 

DeathFromBelow

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I try to explain it like this to those who really don't know.

I ask "Have you ever been to a 3D movie". Most everyone has. "Did you enjoy the 3D effects?" Most will say yes.
"You could see a real depth in the picture and the near and far of objects really brought the movie to life right?" Most will say, Yes it really did.
Then I ask "Did you feel like you were in the movie yourself?" They will say, well no of course not.
I respond with "VR bridges this gap. the 3D effect surrounds you, and visually your brain is convinced what you are seeing is real because all the queues for how it perceives these things are there."
This is why VR is more than just a effect like 3D on a screen and also why this first generation of products are expensive.
I don't buy the 'bridging the gap' argument. From what I've read it's cool until your brain adjusts to it, then it's just a hard-to-read low resolution screen stuck to your face. I've had the exact same experience with 3d films: the effects are nifty at first but by the end I'm tired of it.
 
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I don't buy the 'bridging the gap' argument. From what I've read it's cool until your brain adjusts to it, then it's just a hard-to-read low resolution screen stuck to your face. I've had the exact same experience with 3d films: the effects are nifty at first but by the end I'm tired of it.
I've used the Rift DK2 for a few hours. When I put it on, my brain quickly accepts what I see as the new reality. It's very different from 3D in the cinema, which never feels natural to me. With that said, the resolution, screen door effect, lack of focus when not looking at the center and sim sickness are all big issues at times, and I doubt the Rift CV or Vive are that much better.

I would suggest waiting for more software, and maybe the next HMD generation.
 

DeathFromBelow

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I've used the Rift DK2 for a few hours. When I put it on, my brain quickly accepts what I see as the new reality. It's very different from 3D in the cinema, which never feels natural to me.
I wasn't referring to 'adapting' in that sense, I just mean that after a while the novelty of VR wears off and you're stuck with a low res screen strapped to your face. Same thing with 3D movies, its kinda cool in places but by the end of the movie I'm tired of it and I'm annoyed by the effect of the 3d implimentation on image quality.
 

zamardii12

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I have S6 Edge+, but I'm afraid that using a cell phone would ruin my VR experience. I got dizzy by holding my cell phone near my eyes. It was hard to focus.
Perhaps I should just wait and see if I can test VR somewhere. I really would like to buy it now though, if it's something cool.
What different things does it accomplish? It's just a screen in front of your eyes, right?
Dude, it is absolutely nothing like holding a phone up to your eyes. Do yourself a favor and buy yourself a Samsung Gear VR. You will not regret it. Trust me. It's the best $99 I ever spent, and shortly after that I bought a HTC Vive. As amazing as the Gear VR was, the Vive just blows it out the water.
 

zamardii12

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I wasn't referring to 'adapting' in that sense, I just mean that after a while the novelty of VR wears off and you're stuck with a low res screen strapped to your face. Same thing with 3D movies, its kinda cool in places but by the end of the movie I'm tired of it and I'm annoyed by the effect of the 3d implimentation on image quality.
Have you used a VR headset before? This is absolutely nothing like anything you're saying. I know we are on the [H]ardforums where we mostly talk about PC gaming, but it's not just a "low res screen strapped to your face," and it's tiring to hear people keep saying that. Once you realize that you are IN the game world you don't pay attention to the low-res screen anymore. If you take a step back I actually posted a HTC Vive review so that might help you understand. Obviously some people can't stand the screen, the SDE, and all the other nuances of it but it's literally unlike anything you've ever experienced before. You can't look at this from the standpoint of it being a low-res screen. Think of it as a portal to transport your physical body into a game. You can literally be a wizard and cast spells, a zombie hunter shooting zombies, a explorer and adventurer solving puzzles and mysteries... it's unlike anything that we're used to when it comes to regular gaming. If you can find a Gamestop near your area demoing the Vive then go and try it out. You might not like it, but you might fall in love with it. It's not for everyone, but believe that i've shown my Vive to a bunch of people and they were absolutely awestruck when done.
 
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