I7 5960x o Xeon

Sepe

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Jul 1, 2010
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I have asus pro 3.1 X99 plate oc, I have hesitation to buy which is faster I7 5960x or Xeon V3 10Cores 20 Threads? edicción work for video and 3D dmisiones? Thank you.
 

primetime

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Aug 17, 2005
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I have asus pro 3.1 X99 plate oc, I have hesitation to buy which is faster I7 5960x or Xeon V3 10Cores 20 Threads? edicción work for video and 3D dmisiones? Thank you.
a quick google search shows the xeon v3 a bit quicker....but thats also at stock clocks...if your going to overclock the i7 is maybe faster....non overclocked the xeon should get more work done. Its really kinda a tough call isn't it?
 

morningreis

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Aug 10, 2005
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At stock speeds, the Xeon 2687w v3 has a slightly higher base clock, but also 10 cores instead of 8. So for video I'd go for that hands down if you're not overclocking

Here comes the napkin math. The Xeon will have a locked multiplier and it's going to be harder to overclock a chip with more cores. The 5960x does not, and overclock well.

No OC
Case 1 5960x:
3.0Ghz x 16 Threads = 48GHz

Case 2 2687w v3:
3.1GHz x 20 Threads = 62GHz

Xeon wins

With OC
Case 1 5960x:
4.4GHz x 16 Threads = 70.4GHz

Case 2 2687w v3:
70.4GHz / 20 Threads = 3.52GHz

So according to this, the Xeon will match an overclocked 5960x@4.4 with an overclock of 520MHz. It's all going to depend on how much you can OC the Xeon - if at all. If you can get it to 3.52GHz, great but you could have saved $1000 and gotten as much power with the i7. You probably can't push it past that too much.
 

wirk

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Sep 2, 2014
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a quick google search shows the xeon v3 a bit quicker....but thats also at stock clocks...if your going to overclock the i7 is maybe faster....non overclocked the xeon should get more work done. Its really kinda a tough call isn't it?

At stock speeds, there is assumption one can use the full power of all cores and threads, that is the software supports it. This is strongly depending on the particular software but often even the software claiming full support for parallelism rarely can make use of more than 8 cores efficiently. Good example for this is Adobe:

Premier Pro

Lightroom

Photoshop

As one can see, at best only up to 8 cores (often up to 4) there is gain and after that not. It is also known that some software is much more depending on execution speed than the number of cores. So when selecting processor for specific applications one should investigate its multicore/multithreading/speed performance to avoid surprises and/or wasting money. But there is reason to doubt preformance increases beyond 8 cores, manufacturers simply optimized to what was available and reasonable. That may of course change when 10-core processor becomes widely available.

Adding to this situation is overclocking. Overclocked 8-core should go higher than 10-core. In connection with likely better utilization of cores, 8-core would be winning.
 
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