I7 2600k 4.5ghz 1.336v is this Safe OC? Or lower vcore?

apollo18

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Apr 24, 2020
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hey guys i have a i7 2600k and i decided to overclock it, i did some research and tried a bunch of scenarios and i got stable on this.
i want to have a safe oc that lasts me a long time so i read not to pass 1.35V. i am not trying to reach 5ghz or anything, i am happy as long as my voltage is less then 1.35 v so i am happy with this if it looks good to you guys.

specs: i7 2600k with phanteks tc 14 pe air cooler with asus p8p67 pro mobo

i went into the bios and set i have a asus mobo
AI tweaker to 45 x 100
LLC SET to high (50%)
offset - 0.020V

and so far i am running OCCT and it hasnt crashed, i tried to lower the offset but it crashes at -0.025. so -0.020v seems stable so far.

temps are okay, around 60 celcius durring occt and cpuz v core hits 1.336max and is between 1.31ish-1.336 during the stress test

what do you guys think of this overclock? should i change anything?

some people say dont use offset because it lowers the idle voltage too much the pc seems fine so far, can i get the voltage lower some how? or what should i do in this scenario.
should i do manual voltage or set llc different? or is it good to go?

thx
 

Delicieuxz

[H]ard|Gawd
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If your temps are OK, anything under 1.4v should be fine.

I have the same CPU and mobo as what you're overclocking, and my OC settings are in my signature. It's been a long time since I tweaked it, though, and I don't remember everything that I did. You can't just copy and paste my settings, though. And doing that could be dangerous for your CPU. You have to find what works for the CPU you have.

My CPU idles around 1.064v, and under stress-test load goes up to 1.424v. But my CPU isn't a great overclocker. If yours is average, I think it should easily handle 4.6 ghz while staying under 1.4v. Lots of these CPUs can even do 4.7 ghz while remaining under 1.4v.

I prefer using an offset voltage rather than a constant one and haven't had any issues with it. My OC has been completely stable.
 

apollo18

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Apr 24, 2020
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Thanks a ton for the reply,
I like being under 1.35V,
What do you think of my 50% LLC setting and stuff? Or is my voltage too high or the offset too high or does it not matter? My temps are fine and even if I have stability issues soon I’ll just raise the offset by 0.005V and that should fix everything right?
 

RamonGTP

Supreme [H]ardness
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The safest and most stable way to OC IMO is to set a constant voltage and disable all the speed step features that down-clock and under volting of the CPU. Obviously it's not the most efficient method. I would also opt to use a voltage high enough for stability without the use of LLC. LLC cause a huge transient response spike when the CPU goes from a high load and instantly to an idle state. LLC + speed step causes huge transient response dips and spikes when going instantly from high load/no load/back to high load.

There are obviously lots of different OC methodologies and undoubtedly many may disagree with mine.
 

apollo18

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Apr 24, 2020
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hey guys! i got my first bsod today it was during gaming randomly and im sure its due to the oc since i dont really game that much.
my current settings are 4.4 ghz i7 2600k with asus mobo, llc is at 50% setting (asus mobo) and offset is -0.030V. i didnt touch anything else
If I make the offset -0.025V will that solve my bsod during gaming problem? or help solve it?

i read somewhere or maybe im wrong but isn't offset the voltage at idle or something? if so then i dont understand how changing the offset would affect anything when my bsod's only happen when i am gaming.

i could be wrong and if i am then i think changing the offset from -0.030 t0 -.025 should make my oc stabler / perfect.

right?
 

III_Slyflyer_III

Limp Gawd
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Sep 17, 2019
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316
Offset is what is "added" when the processor is under LOAD. So according to your post, under load, you are taking away voltage. That should be a POSITIVE number. :)

Also, run a test like RealBench to at least verify stability first. I have always found RealBench a good indication if you are going to be gaming stable or not.
 

apollo18

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Apr 24, 2020
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Offset is what is "added" when the processor is under LOAD. So according to your post, under load, you are taking away voltage. That should be a POSITIVE number. :)

Also, run a test like RealBench to at least verify stability first. I have always found RealBench a good indication if you are going to be gaming stable or not.

yeah it seems like my cpu wants alot of voltage normally. i didnt hit the silicon lottery.
when i have my offset + then my voltage is 1.37 and above which i dont really like so i kept lowering my offset until i was stable. this is with llc at 50%, idrk what llc does but people recommend it so i started with 50% llc. i then stayed stable with -0.025v of offset which makes my max v core during stress/gaming about 1.33V max which i am happy with.
 

SticKx911

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Mar 14, 2004
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Temps and extreme voltage are the only really focus points. Keep temps below a comfortable number, and add voltage/mhz till you hit it. I had a 2500k at 4.9 for years at 1.4v. After a while, temps became harder to manage and I had to tune it down a bit. Those have a thermal max of something like 100c. Most would say keeping it at or below 80c is perfectly healthy.

Overclocking has risks. The stock boost clock on that is only 3.8. If you can muster 4.4 and keep temps well under limits, I'd say it was worth the effort.
 

bal3wolf

Limp Gawd
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May 14, 2008
Messages
373
my 2600k been running for 5+ years at 4.8Ghz+ with 1.35 it ran 5ghz for a few years but when i retired it to being my plex server i droped it to 4.8.
 

greyboxer

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Oct 23, 2017
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Also jumping in the longevity train here. Alot of the chip degradation talk that used to go around is largely folklore. Maybe some lower quality boards cause chip degradation at higher voltages due to poor regulation, but with a solid board, you should feel very comfortable about the longevity of your chip at a lower than 1.45v overclock provided temps are under 90c.

Ran a 3770k for 3 years at 4.8ghz 1.46v and it was a gloriously sturdy chip. Before that, I had a 2500k (same Z68 motherboard) which I ran at 4.5ghz/1.4v for nearly 5 years.
 

Mark777

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Jan 21, 2021
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Hi all,

thread necro!

Like the OP, apollo18, I'm STILL running an i7-2600K box (and an Asus Z77 mobo), built new back in early 2012 ... here in 2021! And it's prompted me to get something off my chest I've meant to for (literally) years;

I honestly don't understand the reasoning behind, in effect, undervolting a CPU with negative offset (usually resulting in, it would seem, worryingly low idle voltage) and at the same time over-volting it with LLC.

My i7-2600K @ 4.5GHz, 1.32V vcore (for most of those years) - no changes in BIOS other than +0.070 (70mV) offset - no LLC, no nothing.

(I tell a lie - a couple of minor tweaks done for no other reason than 'why not?' in Digi + Power Control - IIRC 'CPU power phase control = optimal' and a manually set (but fairly conservative) VRM frequency.)

This means that at 100% load (proper, continuous 100%, IBT or Prime small FFTs, never reached in any real-world context) VID is at c. 1.4V while vcore is at 1.32V due to droop (no LLC, remember).

Benefits (of 0% LLC)?

1- NO voltage undershoot spikes coming off load, and an idle voltage comfortably above what's needed, hence no chance whatsoever of 'idle-state' crashes - absolute stability under all conditions. And no big vcore overshoot spikes bumping up to full load, either.

2- an easy life for the VRM's - no constant voltage 'hunting' demanded by LLC, which in some quarters is reckoned to be another major benefit (having used LLC for a while, I remember seeing constant small changes in vcore under full load - without it, once temps have stabilised vcore settles to a practically unwavering 1.32v).

Trade-offs?

Instead of idling at c. 0.98V (standard BIOS settings) or even lower with with -ve offset, it's at 1.056V (pretty much VID + the 0.070v offset - no v-droop at idle) so (the horror!) the CPU is using maybe 7w instead of 6w which, allowing for actual 'at-the-wall' draw, might be about an extra £3 a year on my electricity bills - if it was powered-up and just idling 24/365. But of course it isn't, and the bump-up in power consumption from the overclock when the PC is actually doing some work dwarfs that (for e.g, running overnight video encodes), to the point it doesn't warrant consideration

(Actually, that very issue might spur an upgrade soon - the overclocked 2600K can STILL easily match current, budget, quad-core CPU's ... but uses more than double the power doing it - I swear, I got up the other freezing morning here in the UK having left some Handbrake encodes running overnight and I didn't have to put the heating on! I'm quite serious!).

But anyway - what am I missing here? Why the elaborate (even arcane) BIOS adjustments that seem to be almost universally recommended?
 
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