How to wipe large drive over 3TB?

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Can anyone give some suggestions on some free programs to wipe my Seagate 4TB HDD before I sell it? I'm assuming Killdisk and DBAN don't have such support for large drives since I keep getting errors when trying to load those from the boot CD's.
 

pendragon1

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Can anyone give some suggestions on some free programs to wipe my Seagate 4TB HDD before I sell it? I'm assuming Killdisk and DBAN don't have such support for large drives since I keep getting errors when trying to load those from the boot CD's.
i think seatools can secure erase.
"Full Erase (SATA) Full Erase will write zeros to all sectors on the drive. Full Erase will take several hours to complete and may be aborted at any time. The boot drive should not be listed as an available choice. Boot drive detection is sometimes difficult so be careful to confirm that the boot drive is not available or selected. "
 

FSCDiablo

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35802.png

have a sense of humor :D
 
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i think seatools can secure erase.
"Full Erase (SATA) Full Erase will write zeros to all sectors on the drive. Full Erase will take several hours to complete and may be aborted at any time. The boot drive should not be listed as an available choice. Boot drive detection is sometimes difficult so be careful to confirm that the boot drive is not available or selected. "

Thanks! I also found out WD Diagnostics has something similar. I'm letting that run today since it looks like it'll take 8hrs+
 

daglesj

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You only have to do one pass on HDDs since hmmm the late 20th Century. Wasting your time doing any more than that. Try it.
 

rive22

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I use ActiveKilldisk all the time with large drives. You probably just need to update.
 

SamirD

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Most drives today have the secure erase feature built into the drive. This is the quickest and more reliable way to wipe a drive as it gets all the sectors--even those that are not accessable to the interface. I read up n this a while back and it amazed me to what extent fips drives have to go to be secure. (y)
 
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SvenBent

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Windows build in full format since vista does a Zero fill acrsso the disk now. can evne do multiple wipes with hte command line

cipher /w:<Drive>: fills all empty space with 3 iterations of wipeisn (0,1,random)

ATA Secured arase command would be the best option if it implemented correctly in the drive as it will touches arease unreachable by OS. but again you are now trusting the device

so yeah not big reason to go get software for it fir just simple user space wiping
 

zandor

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Most drives today have the secure erase feature built into the drive. This is the quickest and more reliable way to wipe a drive as it gets all the sectors--even those that are not accessable to the interface. I read up n this a while back and it amazed me to what extent fips drives have to go to be secure. (y)
^ This. I haven't done it in a while but I usually just use hdparm utility in Linux to initiate a secure erase. Last time I needed it most distros included it in the installer image, so you can just boot the installer and switch over to the console to run hdparm.

I've never sold a drive. By the time I get rid of them it's usually not worth the hassle, so my final wipe process normally starts with finding my set of "security" screwdriver bits and peeling off all the "warranty void if removed" stickers and often involves disc platter frisbee. SSD disposal starts with the security bits and ends with a hammer.

If you're really paranoid do multiple overwrites with random patterns on mechanical drives too along with the secure erase. The government (think CIA) can get some of the data back after multiple overwrites. That's really not much of a threat for personal data on a used hard drive. It takes a lab, a lot of time, knowledge, etc. -- so not cheap at all. The question is how much could your data be worth to someone and would they even think about bothering even if they could get an appropriately equipped lab to do it? It's not worth that kind of hassle just to steal someone's identity. The thieves will just go find a softer target.
 

x509

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^ This. I haven't done it in a while but I usually just use hdparm utility in Linux to initiate a secure erase. Last time I needed it most distros included it in the installer image, so you can just boot the installer and switch over to the console to run hdparm.

I've never sold a drive. By the time I get rid of them it's usually not worth the hassle, so my final wipe process normally starts with finding my set of "security" screwdriver bits and peeling off all the "warranty void if removed" stickers and often involves disc platter frisbee. SSD disposal starts with the security bits and ends with a hammer.

If you're really paranoid do multiple overwrites with random patterns on mechanical drives too along with the secure erase. The government (think CIA) can get some of the data back after multiple overwrites. That's really not much of a threat for personal data on a used hard drive. It takes a lab, a lot of time, knowledge, etc. -- so not cheap at all. The question is how much could your data be worth to someone and would they even think about bothering even if they could get an appropriately equipped lab to do it? It's not worth that kind of hassle just to steal someone's identity. The thieves will just go find a softer target.
Just don't sell any drives on eBay. :)
 

SamirD

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Just don't sell any drives on eBay. :)
Why not? The built in secure erase is beyond writing the drive. Hell, for drives that are encrypted, all you have to do is change the encryption code and secure erase it and it's all toast. I doubt anyone on ebay is trying to take drives and get the data off of them--you'd want to intercept the drives earlier like when a corporation sends them to the recycler. Hence why most companies just shred the drives.
 
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