How does Turbo work with overclocking?

CoreStoffer

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This might seem like a stupid question, but I would still like to know the answer. :)

Say you’re overclocking a CPU from 3,5 GHz to 4,5 GHz stable on a CPU that will normally be able to Turbo up to 4,0 GHz (without any overclocking done).

What will the CPU be able to Turbo up to after the overclock?

Will it now reach up to 5,0 GHz Turbo (the sum of the 1 GHz overclock and the 0,5 GHz Turbo), or will the simply not engage in Turbo because the CPU is at its thermal limit at 4,5GHz?

Does anybody know how this work? :confused:
 

Cerulean

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It's better if you turn off all power savings / down-clocking / Turbo / automated overclocking features and do an overclock yourself. ;o
 

CoreStoffer

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It's better if you turn off all power savings / down-clocking / Turbo / automated overclocking features and do an overclock yourself. ;o

Hmmm, I don’t like the idea for not having any power savings enabled at all, but maybe there is also the option of overclocking to say, only 4,2 GHz, and let the CPU Turbo “the rest of the way” up to 4,5 GHz?

But I don’t quite understand how this works out. :eek:
 

cyclone3d

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Generally, if you change the multiplier, the CPU will not go into Turbo mode anymore.

You can still have power saving enabled, but you usually will end up with a lower max overclock than with power saving disabled.

You also NEVER, EVER want to leave voltages on Auto when overclocking as almost all motherboards will severely overvolt when left on Auto voltages when overclocking.
 

CoreStoffer

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Generally, if you change the multiplier, the CPU will not go into Turbo mode anymore.

You can still have power saving enabled, but you usually will end up with a lower max overclock than with power saving disabled.

You also NEVER, EVER want to leave voltages on Auto when overclocking as almost all motherboards will severely overvolt when left on Auto voltages when overclocking.

Thanks for the info!

Oh yeah, I learned that lesson about Auto voltage when overclocking the 3770K. :eek:

And on that topic, I never quite got to the point where I fully trusted that CPU Voltage Offset Mode either. :eek:
 

Araxie

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It's better if you turn off all power savings / down-clocking / Turbo / automated overclocking features and do an overclock yourself. ;o

worse advice ever?.. that worked with first gen "Core i" series.. from sandy and more recent that its not affected by anything in fact its even better to use all power saving features..

Thanks for the info!

Oh yeah, I learned that lesson about Auto voltage when overclocking the 3770K. :eek:

And on that topic, I never quite got to the point where I fully trusted that CPU Voltage Offset Mode either. :eek:

i use offset voltage for all my rigs i found thats the best of two worlds being able to save power in idle, low, mid and even high loads.. Offset voltage still cap the voltage im using actually with my 3770k too at 4.5ghz and the voltage its still capped at 1.248v using offset voltage of +0.030v with 75% of LLC and i have all power saving features enabled.

about your first question.. turbo overclocking its the simplest way to overclock a processor actually, you just open the BIOS set the Turbo CPU multiplier keep the voltage in auto, save changes enter in windows test voltages with Prime95 if voltages are too high you can apply a negative offset to undervolt the chip until the lowest possible stable voltage, if voltage its too low and unstable you can apply a positive offset until you find the correct amount of stability.. for example for 4.2ghz i can undervolt the autovoltage my 3770k and use 1.080v at that speed which its a nice a cool overclock over stock turbo 3.7ghz and how? by just apply a negative offset of 0.075v and LLC of 25%. so the voltage at any load its reduced by 0.075 even the idle voltage its reduced by that amount.. and that was my perfect overclock for a couple of months best of two worlds more speed without apply almost any extra voltage
 

Unknown-One

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Some seriously weird advice going on in this thread...

Overclocking on modern Intel processors is as easy as changing the Turbo Multi. When the processor is placed under load, Turbo will activate and overclock the CPU to the desired value.

Voltage even auto-adjusts to the higher frequency. You might not need to touch it at all for moderate overclocks.
 

Araxie

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exactly.. but isn't weird at all, in the past that was the best way to achieve higher overclocks to avoid instability and issues with other components i remember for example the issues with nehalem power saving features and SSD after certain overclocks and people had to disable certain power saving to avoid those issues.. but man, that is a thing of the past..
 

TheRapture

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I just dialed in my max voltage and max multi...left power saving on so it can clock down the multi and run at 2ghz. Then under load it runs my overclocked setting of 4.5ghz.

Simple really, overclocking Haswell is not near as difficult as it seems.
 

TheRapture

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Actualy mine will drop to 1900mhz at low load...which would be 1100mhz over the 800...which is the same amount as the overclock at load from 3.4 to 4.5 so I assume it drops the multi down a specific amount from whatever the multi is set at for the overclock.
 

Araxie

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pretty weird really.. that shouldn't be affected in that way, turbo clocks shouldn't affect idle clocks.. i'll investigate that strange situation sadly i do not have any haswell chip to test.. =( but as far i know all drops to 800mhz weird..
 
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