HDD Recovery - HELP!

JOSHSKORN

Limp Gawd
Joined
May 29, 2007
Messages
262
So it looks like my 7 year old Seagate Desktop External 4TB drive has started to seen better days. Unfortunately, it was my backup hard disk drive, I had it attached to an ASUS RT-AC87U. It had been giving me problems lately so I disconnected it and connected it directly to my computer, and it would show up as a drive, I would see my files but I couldn't copy them. Then the connection became very unstable and well, I inadvertantly knocked the hard drive off my desk and probably killed it, since it hit hardwood floor. It was probably only a 2 1/2 ft drop, too. I spent an hour or so researching how to take it apart, so I did, then plugged the bare drive itself into some other hard drive base I have which plugs into USB 3.0. I heard the same sounds, same results. Pretty sure the drive is dead.

Are there other ways of doing data recovery without having to go get it paid to get it done or will I just end up with the same result? I do have an eSATA port in the back of my computer. I wouldn't know if plugging it in there might have different results, or if I'd get different results should I start my computer with a bootable USB into some different OS. Any input would be great. Thanks.

EDIT: I thought I should mention that when the drive starts up, I hear some ticking noise in the initialization but then it goes away in a few seconds. I'd been watching YouTube about taking the drive apart, spinning the platters counter-clockwise with a screw driver until (I'm not sure what you call it?) the "Landing zone?" is off of the platters, then reassembling. Not sure if I should try doing that myself, but at this point, I feel like I've got no other choice unless I want to pay for expensive data recovery, which I don't.

EDIT #2: I decided to plug the hard drive back into my HDD dock (I'm using this one). Basically after it starts up, the light is flashing blue/purple, repeatedly and I'm getting the Windows 10 sound for a disk disconnection every 5-10 seconds. Still haven't tried to take the hard drive apart, I'll do that tomorrow. I thought I'd give it another go to see if the disk shows up in Computer Management. It does not, unfortunately.
 
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sinisterDei

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Dec 1, 2004
Messages
1,284
Er, if it was your backup, then presumably you have that data elsewhere?

If it was the sole copy of data you deem important, then the most important thing to do is STOP RIGHT NOW. You have a $500 decision to make; is your data worth $500, or not. If so, you want a real data recovery service. If not, then, well, byebye!
 

Ready4Dis

2[H]4U
Joined
Nov 4, 2015
Messages
2,375
The other option is to throw it in a fridge for a while and then try it again. Lots of drives will start working after being cold for a short period of time to allow data recovery. Full disclosure, this used to be more common than it is now due to changes in the way hard drivers are designed and operate so the chances of recovery are much slimmer using this method.

As mentioned above though, if it's super important data you may want to stop messing with it and bring it somewhere. Well, good luck, if it's toast then there may not be much you can do about it really, this is what data backups and stuff are for, however annoying it is.

p.s It used to be throw it in the freezer, but I wouldn't recommend getting it cold enough to freeze any moisture that may have made its way into the drive. Just cold, but not freezing, it's possible it will loosen up for a short period so you can grab data off. If it works, start with the most important first as it may lock up again!
 

Grimham

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Jul 20, 2004
Messages
1,511
If that data isn't all that important and you have tried everything else then you can try giving it a few love taps with the handle of a screwdriver or similar. I've had minor success doing this.
 

Kardonxt

2[H]4U
Joined
Apr 13, 2009
Messages
3,252

sinisterDei is correct. If this data is important to you stop now. Taking apart the drive will almost certainly result in never being able to recover the data or greatly increasing the cost of recovery.​

 

lopoetve

Fully [H]
Joined
Oct 11, 2001
Messages
30,166
How much do you need the data? it's almost certainly recoverable, it's just a question of what it will cost you.
 

BrainEater

Gawd
Joined
Jul 21, 2004
Messages
1,022
I will mirror the comments about not taking it apart.

You might try something like r-studio .

Failing that, pay.

:D
 
Joined
Dec 8, 2016
Messages
8
The other option is to throw it in a fridge for a while and then try it again. Lots of drives will start working after being cold for a short period of time to allow data recovery. Full disclosure, this used to be more common than it is now due to changes in the way hard drivers are designed and operate so the chances of recovery are much slimmer using this method.

As mentioned above though, if it's super important data you may want to stop messing with it and bring it somewhere. Well, good luck, if it's toast then there may not be much you can do about it really, this is what data backups and stuff are for, however annoying it is.

p.s It used to be throw it in the freezer, but I wouldn't recommend getting it cold enough to freeze any moisture that may have made its way into the drive. Just cold, but not freezing, it's possible it will loosen up for a short period so you can grab data off. If it works, start with the most important first as it may lock up again!

This has worked for me a couple times in the past, really curious. Suggest the OP gives it a shot, shouldn´t get any worse than it is, hehe
 

likeman

Gawd
Joined
Aug 17, 2011
Messages
736
So it looks like my 7 year old Seagate Desktop External 4TB drive has started to seen better days.
its not a backup if you MOVE your data to the external hdd (not sure why people think its a backup when they move the data and only have 1 backup of said data)

Seagates don't like been dropped (kida a design flaw that the heads can move from the parked position, so when you next power it on it does unrecoverable damage to the disk platters) the heads inside the disk would have been ripped off or scratch circles on the disk when the disk spun up, most data recovery people won't even touch it especially if you told them you have powered up a seagate HDD multiple times after dropping it on the floor
 
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